ALL ABOUT THE CHIROPRACTIC RESEARCH AGENDA
 
   

All About the
Chiropractic Research Agenda

This section was compiled by Frank M. Painter, D.C.
Send all comments or additions to:
  Frankp@chiro.org
Jump to:    About the Chiropractic Research Agenda         Research Agenda Conferences

                       Consortial Center for Chiropractic Research (C3R)
 
   

About the Chiropractic Research Agenda
 
   

Palmer Awarded Federal Contract to Set Chiropractic Research Agenda
Dynamic Chiropractic ~ December 18, 1995
Palmer College of Chiropractic has landed a contract with the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) titled, "A National Workshop to Develop the Chiropractic Research Agenda." The project involves the creation of a interdisciplinary panel to recommend priorities for chiropractic research. The evaluation of chiropractic procedures through research is generally considered a key factor in determining to what extent chiropractic will be used in mainstream health care.

Panelists Named to "National Workshop to Develop the Chiropractic
Research Agenda"

Dynamic Chiropractic ~ April 22, 1996
After a lengthy and exhaustive nomination process, a group of 35 individuals have been selected as panelists for the "National Workshop to Develop the Chiropractic Research Agenda." The project is being conducted by the Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research under a contract awarded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Bureau of Health Professions.

A Chiropractic Research Agenda
Dynamic Chiropractic ~ May 20, 1996
There has been quite of bit of talk lately about the project entitled, "A National Workshop to Set the Chiropractic Research Agenda." Not all of it has been accurate, and so I am using this opportunity to explain some of the background, the process, and what I hope will be the ultimate outcome. The purpose of the project is to conduct a meeting to arrive at a consensus of experts about chiropractic research topics and their priorities. Five general areas for chiropractic research will be explored. They are: outcomes research, clinical research, educational research, health services research, and educational research. The results of the deliberations will be published in the refereed scientific literature where they can be easily retrieved and used.

Reflections on the Creation of a Research Agenda for Chiropractic
Dynamic Chiropractic ~ September 23, 1996
In July, a workshop was held to develop a research agenda for chiropractic. Interestingly, the effort was initiated by the federal government with a contract to Palmer College of Chiropractic. The amount of money involved was not large, but apparently, it was enough to cause an event like this to happen, something that should have happened in chiropractic many years ago. We should all reflect on this, because it is indicative of the leadership gridlock that has historically affected the development of new knowledge in chiropractic. The dearth of defensible information about chiropractic and chiropractors is still hampering our external ability to integrate successfully with the rest of the so-called health industry.

The National Workshop to Develop the Chiropractic Research Agenda
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1997 (Mar);   20 (3):   147–149

The primary outcome of the workshop was the completion of five position papers, one for each of the topics addressed. Also, a consensus process was initiated at the workshop on infrastructure needs of the profession but, because of the diversity of experience and opinions and the broad scope of the topic, was not completed by the end of the project year.

Basic Science Research in Chiropractic:
The State of the Art and Recommendations for a Research Agenda

J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1997 (Mar);   20 (3):   150–168

A position paper was prepared as background information for participants in the National Workshop to Develop the Chiropractic Workshop Agenda conducted by the Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research, Davenport, Iowa. The paper was revised in light of comments and suggestions at the workshop by participants and by a workgroup composed of basic scientists from within and outside of chiropractic. This final article documents the history of basic science research in chiropractic, and the current state of the art of basic science research conducted since 1975 by chiropractors or investigators at chiropractic institutions in North America. Seed recommendations contained in the working paper for the development of an adequate infrastructure needed to conduct future research and seed recommendations for a future basic science research agenda were also modified and revised by the workgroup participants through a modified nominal group process. The final recommendations contained in this article represent a synthesis of these recommendations and those of the authors.

Outcomes Research in Chiropractic: The State of the Art
and Recommendations for the Chiropractic Research Agenda

J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1997 (Mar);   20 (3):   185–200

An extensive search of the literature from 1990 through 1994 was undertaken using electronic databases (Medline, Index to Chiropractic Literature, EMBASE, and ERIC) and hand searches were conducted for relevant studies published in 1995. Publication in English, publication in a peer-reviewed journal, weight of evidence (study design) and measurement of patient-relevant outcomes were primary inclusion criteria. We prepared a draft with recommendation, rationale, actions required, responsible parties and expected outcomes for each seed statement. An outcomes workgroup, convened at the Research Agenda Work shop, added its perspective to the seed recommendations and actions required. Finally, the white paper authors prepared the final recommendations for outcomes research in chiropractic.

Health Services Research Related to Chiropractic:
Review and Recommendations for Research Prioritization
by the Chiropractic Profession

J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1997 (Mar);   20 (3):   201–217

Six recommendations for a health services research agenda for the chiropractic profession were made: determine barriers to usage of chiropractic; develop models to explain chiropractic usage; determine cost-effectiveness of different chiropractic procedures; develop valid measures and predictors of quality of chiropractic care; and examine satisfaction with chiropractic services from patients, other providers, purchasers, etc.

Progress in Chiropractic Research
Dynamic Chiropractic ~ October 6, 1997
Financed by the Bureau of Health Professions of the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, the second National Conference to Establish the Chiropractic Research Agenda was held in June in Alexandria, Virginia. This time, 70 participants from over 15 disciplines worked to create "concept proposals," which are essentially the blueprints for specific research projects.

Chiropractic Research Garners More Federal Dollars
Dynamic Chiropractic ~ November 3, 1997
The HRSA has awarded a second million dollar grant to Western States to assess both chiropractic and medical treatment of low back pain. The HRSA has awarded a $816,000 grant (over three years) to LACC for a study that will assess the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of spinal manipulation vs. spinal mobilization, heat therapy, and electrical muscle stimulation for treating neck pain. Pain reduction, functional improvement, and patient satisfaction will be assessed. As we go to press, the information coming out of National College concerning their HRSA grant is sparse. We can tell you that it is $431,000 grant, and that the study will compare the flexion-distraction technique vs. medical care for low back pain.

Moving Chiropractic Forward:
An Interview with Bill Meeker, D.C., M.P.H.

Healthy.net ~ 2000
This interview with Dan Redwood, D.C. starts:   “Since being named in 1998 to head the Consortial Center for Chiropractic Research (CCCR), Bill Meeker has been at the center of a burgeoning chiropractic research effort. Supported by the National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), CCCR is a joint endeavor that currently includes six chiropractic colleges and three state-supported universities. Its essential mission is twofold: to support high quality research projects and to create a sustainable chiropractic research infrastructure.”

Health Services Research Related to Chiropractic: Review and Recommendations for Research Prioritization by the Chiropractic Profession
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2006 (Nov);   29 (9):   707–725

The past 10 years have seen numerous health service research studies related to chiropractic; however, nearly all of the research priorities identified in 1995 remain unaddressed and remain as important priorities. Thus, recommendations were reprioritized and revised to submit for open comment and hearing.   A smaller number of more concise recommendations with more specific action steps are proposed for clinical quality improvement, performing cost analyses, and assessing use barriers for chiropractic.

Research Priorities of the Canadian Chiropractic Profession:
A Consensus Study Using a Modified Delphi Technique

Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2017 (Dec 12);   25:   38

This project identified research priority areas for the Canadian chiropractic profession. The top three priority areas were all in the area of health services research: 1) Integration of chiropractic care into multidisciplinary settings; 2) Costs and cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care; 3) Effect of chiropractic care on reducing medical services.

 
   
The Research Agenda Conferences (RAC I-XXIII)
 
   

WikiChiro Research Agenda Conference Page


ACC-RAC 2018:
(RAC 23)

   Platform and poster presentation abstracts RAC 23

ACC-RAC 2017:
Impact Spinal Health

(RAC 22)

   Platform and poster presentation abstracts RAC 22

ACC-RAC 2016:
Interprofessional Collaboration:
Working Together for a Better Future

(RAC 21)

   Platform and poster presentation abstracts RAC 21

ACC-RAC 2015:
Aiming for Effective Change:
Leadership in Chiropractic Education

(RAC 20)

   Platform and poster presentation abstracts RAC 20

ACC-RAC 2014:
(RAC 19)

   Platform and poster presentation abstracts RAC 19

ACC-RAC 2013:
(RAC 18)

   Platform and poster presentation abstracts RAC 18

ACC-RAC 2012:
(RAC 17)

   Platform and poster presentation abstracts RAC 17

ACC-RAC 2011:
(RAC 16)

   Platform and poster presentation abstracts RAC 16

ACC-RAC 2010:
(RAC 15)

   Platform and poster presentation abstracts RAC 15

ACC-RAC 2009:
(RAC 14)

   Platform and poster presentation abstracts RAC 14

ACC-RAC 2008:
(RAC 13)

   Platform and poster presentation abstracts RAC 13

ACC-RAC 2007:
(RAC 12)

   Platform and poster presentation abstracts RAC 12

ACC-RAC 2005:
Emerging Research and Training Opportunities

(RAC 10)


ACC-RAC 2004:
The "Best Practices" of Chiropractic

(RAC 9)


ACC-RAC 2003
Chiropractic Comes of Age at ACC-RAC 2003 Conference

(RAC 8)


ACC-RAC 2002
Association of Chiropractic Colleges (ACC) joins with
the Research Agenda Conference

(RAC 7)


ACC-RAC 2001
Chiropractic Research Conference: Hope at Last

(RAC 6)


ACC-RAC 2001
Research Agenda Conference Slated for July

(RAC 6)


ACC-RAC 2000
Research Agenda Conference:
The Research Funds Are Rehab RAC 'n' Roll

(RAC 5)


ACC-RAC 2000
Research Agenda Conference:
The Research Funds Are Available, but Must Be Used Wisely

(RAC 5)


ACC-RAC 1999
The Research Agenda Conference:
Chiropractic Theory in Research:
Subluxation Theory Finally Gets the Attention It Deserves

(RAC 4)

Robert Mootz, D.C.


ACC-RAC 1999
Synopsis of Research Agenda Conference 4

(RAC 4)
Anthony Rosner, PhD, FCER director of research


ACC-RAC 1999
Expanding Chiropractic's Research Consciousness and Competence:
Report from the 4th Chiropractic Research Agenda Conference

(RAC 4)


ACC-RAC 1999
Dump Subluxation? Give Me a Break!

(RAC 4)

William Meeker,DC, MPH, FICC

ACC-RAC 1998
Comments on the RAC 1-3 Conferences

(RAC 3)

The third annual Research Agenda Conference (RAC3) for the chiropractic profession (June 19-21) was attended by over 140 researchers, a significant number considering there are only about 65 researchers at the chiropractic colleges in North America (out of 1,265 faculty members).

ACC-RAC 1997
Setting the Chiropractic Research Agenda: Conference 2:
Greater Outside Funding and Collaboration for Chiropractic Research Sought

(RAC 2)

Al Adams, DC and Gerard Clum, DC

 
   
About the "Consortial Center for Chiropractic Research"
 
   

Consortial Center for Chiropractic Research --Request for Proposals
The Consortial Center for Chiropractic Research (CCCR) provides an infrastructure for the development of research that can examine the potential effectiveness and validity of chiropractic health care. The CCCR is mandated to prioritize research topics related to chiropractic, provide scientific and technical merit review, and implement selected projects.

Chiropractic Consortium Becomes OAM s 11th Research Center
CAM Newsletter Spring 1998

The OAM and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) have awarded a research grant to support the first federally funded Center for Chiropractic Research. The grant was awarded to the Consortial Center for Chiropractic Research (CCCR), a group of chiropractic colleges and institutions headquartered at Palmer College of Chiropractic in Davenport, Iowa.

Discover the Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research Programs
The Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research, together with Palmer College of Chiropractic West, is organized into six research programs and three offices for planning and administration.

Chiropractic Research Facts
Due to the lack of funding by government agencies, legitimate, sustained scientific research in chiropractic has only recently become fully established. In 1944, the National Chiropractic Association (NCA) created the Chiropractic Research Foundation (CRF) with the objective of promoting and acquiring funding for the development of research for the chiropractic profession.



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