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12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS (2017) ~ Day 4

12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS ~ Day 4

The Chiro.Org Blog


Ray Charles — Merry Christmas Baby

12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS (2017) ~ Day 3

12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS ~ Day 3

The Chiro.Org Blog


Santa Baby — Jazz & Blues Christmas


12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS (2017) ~ Day 2

12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS ~ Day 2

The Chiro.Org Blog


Please Come Home For Christmas — Charles Brown

12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS (2017) ~ Day 1

12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS ~ Day 1

The Chiro.Org Blog


Merry Christmas, Baby — Bonnie Raitt & Charles Brown

Research Priorities of the Canadian Chiropractic Profession

Research Priorities of the Canadian Chiropractic Profession: A Consensus Study Using a Modified Delphi Technique

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2017 (Dec 12); 25: 38

Simon D. French, Peter J. H. Beliveau, Paul Bruno,
Steven R. Passmore, Jill A. Hayden, John Srbely
and Greg N. Kawchuk

School of Rehabilitation Therapy,
Queen’s University


Background   Research funds are limited and a healthcare profession that supports research activity should establish research priority areas. The study objective was to identify research priority areas for the Canadian chiropractic profession, and for stakeholders in the chiropractic profession to rank these in order of importance.

Methods   We conducted a modified Delphi consensus study between August 2015 and May 2017 to determine the views of Canadian chiropractic organisations (e.g. Canadian Chiropractic Association; provincial associations) and stakeholder groups (e.g. chiropractic educational institutions; researchers). Participants completed three online Delphi survey rounds. In Round 1, participants suggested research areas within four broad research themes:

1)   Basic science;
2)   Clinical;
3)   Health services; and
4)   Population health.

In Round 2, researchers created sub-themes by categorising the areas suggested in Round 1, and participants judged the importance of the research sub-themes. We defined consensus as at least 70% of participants agreeing that a research area was “essential” or “very important”. In Round 3, results from Round 2 were presented to the participants to re-evaluate the importance of sub-themes. Finally, participants completed an online pairwise ranking activity to determine the rank order of the list of important research sub-themes.

Results   Fifty-seven participants, of 85 people invited, completed Round 1 (response rate 67%). Fifty-six participants completed Round 2, 55 completed Round 3, and 53 completed the ranking activity. After three Delphi rounds and the pairwise ranking activity was completed, the ranked list of research sub-themes considered important were:

1)   Integration of chiropractic care into multidisciplinary settings;
2)   Costs and cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care;
3)   Effect of chiropractic care on reducing medical services;
4)   Effects of chiropractic care;
5)   Safety/side effects of chiropractic care;
6)   Chiropractic care for older adults;
7)   Neurophysiological mechanisms and
       effects of spinal manipulative therapy;
8)   General mechanisms and effects of spinal manipulative therapy.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Research Agenda Page

Continue reading Research Priorities of the Canadian Chiropractic Profession

$14 Million Research Grant Puts SMT in the Spotlight

$14 Million Research Grant Puts SMT in the Spotlight

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic 2017 (Nov); 35 (11)


  Landmark study could solidify DCs as the
  first line of care for acute LBP.  

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $14 million grant to the University of Minnesota and University of Washington to study the benefits of spinal manipulation for back pain vs. standard medical care (including prescription medication).

Touted as one of the largest back pain studies ever funded by the NIH’s National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, the national, multi-site clinical trial will feature a multidisciplinary research team from the chiropractic, medical, osteopathic, physical therapy and psychology fields, representing a half-dozen universities.

Participating researchers hail from the University of Minnesota (whose
Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality & Healing received the bulk of the NIH award for the clinical trial, which will be conducted at the University of Minnesota and the University of Pittsburgh – two of the leading research-based universities in the U.S.), the University of Washington (which received the remaining funds for data management / statistical support), Oregon Health and Sciences University, Duke University, and the University of North Texas.

The “Spinal Manipulation and Patient Self-Management for Preventing Acute to Chronic Back Pain Trial” will compare spinal manipulative therapy and supported self-management vs. usual medical care (including prescription medications). Supported self-care includes behavioral and copies strategies, mind-body approaches, lifestyle advice, and pain education – all designed to address the biopsychosocial aspects of back pain. Nearly 1,200 patients will be enrolled in the study beginning next spring.

Gert Brontfort, DC, PhD, a professor in the Bakken Center’s Integrative Health and Wellbeing Research Program, will serve as lead investigator on the study. Other doctors of chiropractic involved in the study include the University of Pittsburgh’s Michael Schneider, DC, PhD (co-principal investigator for the Clinical Coordinating Center, which will conduct the clinical trial) and Joel Stevens, DC, PhD; Roni Evans, DC, PhD (who directs the Integrative Health and Wellbeing Research Program at the University of Minnesota Bakken Center), and Brent Leininger, DC, MS, also from the U. of Minnesota.

The Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality & Healing is partially funded by the NCMIC Foundation. According to Mary Jo Kreitzer, PhD, RN, FAAN, a professor in the School of Nursing at the U. of Minnesota and director of the Bakken Center, “The support of NCMIC Foundation has been pivotal to helping the Center establish a world-class research program in chiropractic and integrative health from the influential platform of a prestigious land-grant university. It has also helped us to advance future research affiliations.”


The Chiropractic Perspective:
Q&A With Drs. Brontfort and Evans

Continue reading $14 Million Research Grant Puts SMT in the Spotlight

Harvard Endorses Chiropractic

Harvard Endorses Chiropractic

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic 2017 (Deec); 35 (12)

By Donald M. Petersen Jr., BS, HCD(hc), FICC(h)


Harvard Health Publishing is an arm of the prestigious Harvard Medical School. The publisher’s tag line is “Trusted advice for a healthier life.” Probably the most popular Harvard Health publication is the Harvard Health Letter, which you’ve probably seen or heard referenced.

The Harvard Medical School is one of the more notable exceptions to the rule that medical establishments are generally anti-chiropractic. You may have seen its Special Health Report “Pain Relief: Natural and Alternative Remedies Without Drugs or Surgery,” published in 2015. [1]

While certainly not as all-encompassing as one would have hoped for, the report not only features a section on chiropractic, but also includes chiropractic in the low back pain section, as well as two patient “stories.” The first story (“Gary’s Story: A Journey to Pain Relief”) talks about Gary’s primary MD referring him to a chiropractor. The second story (“Alice’s Story: A Comprehensive Approach to Pain Relief”) talks about how Alice has been using chiropractic, along with other nondrug interventions, for years with positive results.

Last month the Harvard Health Letter featured an article: “Where to Turn for Low Back Pain Relief.” The article’s deck answers the question: “In most cases, a primary care doctor or chiropractor can help resolve the problem.” [2]

Under the section titled “Where to Turn,” we read that for people suffering from back pain, their first call should be to a primary care physician or a chiropractor. Dr. Matthew Kowalski, a DC at Harvard’s Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, is quoted as saying that 35-42 percent of people experiencing their first episode of back pain consult a doctor of chiropractic.

The report concludes by reminding patients that most common back pain issues will be effectively addressed by a primary care MD or a chiropractor. It also references Harvard’s 2014 report on back pain (which also includes information about chiropractic).

There are many observations that immediately come to mind when reading this 2017 report.

Here are my top three:

Continue reading Harvard Endorses Chiropractic

Plasmacytoma of the Cervical Spine

Plasmacytoma of the Cervical Spine: A Case Study

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Chiropractic Medicine 2017 (Jun); 16 (2): 170–174

Richard Pashayan, DC, DABCO, CCSP,
Wesley M. Cavanaugh, DC,
Chad D. Warshel, DC, DACBR, and
David R. Payne, MD

Private Practice,
Flushing, NY.


OBJECTIVE:   The purpose of this case study is to describe the presentation of a patient with plasmacytoma.

CLINICAL FEATURES:   A 49-year-old man presented with progressive neck pain, stiffness, and dysphagia to a chiropractic office. A radiograph indicated a plasmacytoma at C3 vertebral body. The lesion was expansile and caused a mass effect anteriorly on the esophagus and posteriorly on the spinal cord. Neurologic compromise was noted with fasciculations and hypesthesia in the right forearm. The patient was referred to a neurosurgeon.

INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME:   Surgical resection of the tumor was performed with a vertebral body spacer and surrounding titanium cage. Bony fusion was initiated by inserting bone grafts from the iliac crests into the titanium cage. Additional laboratory analysis and advanced imaging confirmed that the plasmacytoma had progressed to multiple myeloma and radiation and chemotherapy were also necessary.

There are other articles like this @ our:

Case Reports Section

Continue reading Plasmacytoma of the Cervical Spine

Chiropractic Management for US Female Veterans With Low Back Pain

Chiropractic Management for US Female Veterans
With Low Back Pain: A Retrospective Study
of Clinical Outcomes

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2017 (Oct); 40 (8): 573–579

Kelsey L. Corcoran, DC, Andrew S. Dunn, DC, MEd, MS,
Lance R. Formolo, DC, MS, Gregory P. Beehler, PhD, MA

Chiropractic Department,
Medical Care Line,
VA Western New York,
Buffalo, New York


OBJECTIVE:   The purpose of this study was to determine if female US veterans had clinically significant improvement in low back pain after chiropractic management.

METHODS:   This is a retrospective chart review of 70 courses of care for female veterans with a chief complaint of low back pain who received chiropractic management through the VA Western New York Healthcare System in Buffalo, New York. A paired t test was used to compare baseline and discharge outcomes for the Back Bournemouth Questionnaire. The minimum clinically important difference was set as a 30% improvement in the outcome measure from baseline to discharge.

RESULTS:   The average patient was 44.8 years old, overweight (body mass index 29.1 kg/m2), and white (86%). The mean number of chiropractic treatments was 7.9. Statistical significance was found for the Back Bournemouth Questionnaire outcomes. The mean raw score improvement was 12.4 points (P < .001), representing a 27.3% change from baseline with 47% of courses of care meeting or exceeding the minimum clinically important difference.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Care For Veterans Page

Continue reading Chiropractic Management for US Female Veterans With Low Back Pain

What Is Chiropractic?

What Is Chiropractic?

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2017 (Nov 2); 25: 30

Jan Hartvigsen and Simon French

Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics,
University of Southern Denmark,
Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M, Denmark.


While in some jurisdictions chiropractic is fully integrated in public and insurance funded health care systems, in others it is outside and considered as complementary or alternative health care. There is a paucity of data and rigorous scientific studies regarding most aspects of chiropractic practice although research activity has been increasing in recent years. We call for papers for a thematic series in Chiropractic and Manual Therapies that can help define chiropractic better to stakeholders inside and outside the profession under the theme What is Chiropractic?

KEYWORDS:   Chiropractic; Editorial; Health policy


From the Full-Text Article:

Background

In 2002, Meeker and Haldeman wrote that “In today’s dynamic health care milieu, chiropractic stands at the crossroads of mainstream and alternative medicine”. [1] Fifteen years later the global identity and place for chiropractic in healthcare is still unresolved. From within chiropractic, one end of the spectrum subscribes to “a philosophy of neo-vitalism” and “a neurologically-centered model of subluxation” [2], while the other end promotes that “chiropractic education should be ……… founded on the principles of evidence-based care” and “the teaching of vertebral subluxation complex as a vitalistic construct that claims that it is the cause of disease is unsupported by evidence”. [3]

There are more articles like this @ our:

The Chiropractic Identity Page

Continue reading What Is Chiropractic?

Clinical Examination Findings as Prognostic Factors in Low Back Pain

Clinical Examination Findings as Prognostic Factors in Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review of the Literature

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2015 (Mar 23); 23: 13

Lisbeth Hartvigsen, Alice Kongsted, and Lise Hestbaek

Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics,
University of Southern Denmark,
Odense, Denmark.


BACKGROUND:   There is a strong tradition of performing a clinical examination of low back pain (LBP) patients and this is generally recommended in guidelines. However, establishing a pathoanatomic diagnosis does not seem possible in most LBP patients and clinical tests may potentially be more relevant as prognostic factors. The aim of this review of the literature was to systematically assess the association between low-tech clinical tests commonly used in adult patients with acute, recurrent or chronic LBP and short- and long-term outcome.

METHODS:   MEDLINE, Embase, and MANTIS were searched from inception to June 2012. Prospective clinical studies of adult patients with LBP with or without leg pain and/or signs of nerve root involvement or spinal stenosis, receiving non-surgical or no treatment, which investigated the association between low-tech clinical tests and outcome were included. Study selection, data extraction and appraisal of study quality were performed independently by two reviewers.

RESULTS:   A total of 5,332 citations were retrieved and screened for eligibility, 342 articles were assessed as full text and 49 met the inclusion criteria. Due to clinical and statistical heterogeneity, qualitative synthesis rather than meta-analysis was performed. Associations between clinical tests and outcomes were often inconsistent between studies. In more than one third of the tests, there was no evidence of the tests being associated with outcome. Only two clinical tests demonstrated a consistent association with at least one of the outcomes: centralization and non-organic signs.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Low Back Pain and Chiropractic Page

and the:

Clinical Prediction Rule Page

Continue reading Clinical Examination Findings as Prognostic Factors in Low Back Pain

Happy Thanksgiving (2017)

Happy Thanksgiving (2017)

The Chiro.Org Blog


All of us at Chiro.Org want to wish our readers and friends
a very happy Thanksgiving.


JFK’s assassination aided by his bad back, records show

Source CNN

Every November the United States remembers Camelot: a shining time of promise led by John F. Kennedy, the nation’s youngest president brought to an abrupt and bloody end on this day in 1963. While conspiracy theorists debate who pulled the trigger, there’s another culprit that often goes unmentioned: Kennedy’s lifelong struggle with back pain.

It was his habit of wearing a tightly laced back brace that may have kept him from recoiling to the floor of his car after the assassin’s first bullet struck him in the neck.

“The brace was a firmly bound corset, around his hips and lower back and higher up,” said Dr. Thomas Pait, a spinal neurosurgeon who co-authored a paper about Kennedy’s failed back surgeries and other treatments such as manipulation under anesthesia.  “He tightly laced it and put a wide Ace bandage around in a figure eight around his trunk. If you think about it, if you have that brace all the way up your chest, above your nipples, and real tight, are you going to be able to bend forward?”

Read more on the CNN website.

The Infant with Dysfunctional Feeding Patterns

The Infant with Dysfunctional Feeding Patterns –
The Chiropractic Assessment

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Clin Chiropractic Pediatrics 2016 (May);   15 (2)

Sharon Vallone, DC, FICCP and
Faraneh Carnegie-Hargreaves, DC

Private practice,
South Windsor,
Connecticut, USA


The World Health Organization recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of an infant’s life, followed by the introduction of complementary foods while breastfeeding for 2 years and beyond. Early and consistent breastfeeding support can often make the difference in a dyad’s ability to establish a functional breastfeeding relationship. While challenged dyads can sometimes accomplish competent breastfeeding given appropriate support, necessary interventions, and an opportunity to learn; timing is critical when a neonate has not been transferring adequate milk volume or is managing feeding in a passive or compensatory manner.

Chiropractors should be most familiar with the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal dysfunctions that could result in an inability to feed. They should also recognize and treat the compensatory changes that will develop in a healthy, neurotypical neonate who is challenged by an inability to feed efficiently in order to prevent the evolution of long term physiologic and postural ramifications.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Pediatrics Page

Continue reading The Infant with Dysfunctional Feeding Patterns

Evaluation and Treatment of Breastfeeding Difficulties Associated with Cervicocranial Dysfunction

Evaluation and Treatment of Breastfeeding Difficulties Associated with Cervicocranial Dysfunction:
A Chiropractic Perspective

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Clin Chiropractic Pediatrics 2016 (Dec); 15 (3): 1301

Sharon Vallone, DC, FICCP

Private Practice,
KIDSPACE Adaptive Play and Wellness,
South Windsor, Connecticut, USA


Increasingly, parents are presenting to the chiropractic office with the chief complaint of breastfeeding dysfunction. Early and consistent breastfeeding support is paramount to the dyad’s ability to establish a functional breastfeeding relationship. It is critical that chiropractors treating this population recognize feeding dysfunction and understand the mechanics of breastfeeding, what might alter those mechanics, and the importance of the role of the International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in supporting the restoration of functional breastfeeding after the chiropractic adjustments have reduced the neuromusculoskeletal (NMSK) dysfunction. This paper outlines some of the mechanical dysfunctions that might interfere with the normal transfer of milk for a neonate.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Pediatrics Page

Continue reading Evaluation and Treatment of Breastfeeding Difficulties Associated with Cervicocranial Dysfunction