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Sustained Improvement of Heart Rate Variability in Patients Undergoing a Program of Chiropractic Care

Sustained Improvement of Heart Rate Variability in Patients Undergoing a Program of Chiropractic Care:
A Retrospective Case Series

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic Journal of Australia 2018; 45 (4): 338–358

Amy Louise Haas, PhD, DC,
David Russell, BSc (Psych), BSc (Chiro), Cert TT

Private Practice,
Nashua, NH, USA


Objective:   The purpose of this study was to report the sustained changes in heart rate variability (HRV) observed in 6 patients undergoing continuous chiropractic care for the correction of vertebral subluxations.

Clinical Features:   Six patients between 25 to 55 years of age all presented with primarily musculoskeletal complaints for chiropractic care in a private practice setting. All patients were nonsmokers with no reported cardiac pathology. All patients were initially assessed for indicators of vertebral subluxation before being accepted for chiropractic care, and were monitored for changes in HRV scores over time.

Intervention and Outcomes:   Chiropractic care, using Diversified and Thompson techniques to correct vertebral subluxations, was provided for an initial period of 10 to 52 weeks at a frequency of 2 to 3 visits per week. HRV, measured by SSDN, increased over the early part of their course of chiropractic care, and these increases were sustained whilst the patient remained under long term continuous care in all 6 patients. Improvements in SDNN ranged from 50% to greater than 300% as compared to pre-care values.

Continue reading Sustained Improvement of Heart Rate Variability in Patients Undergoing a Program of Chiropractic Care

Failure to Define Low Back Pain as a Disease or an Episode Renders Research on Causality Unsuitable

Failure to Define Low Back Pain as a Disease or an Episode Renders Research on Causality Unsuitable: Results of a Systematic Review

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2017 (Jan 9)

Emad M. Ardakani, Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde and Bruce F. Walker

School of Health Professions,
Murdoch University,
90 South St,
Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia


Background   Causative factors may be different for the very first onset of symptoms of the ‘disease’ of low back pain (LBP) than for ensuing episodes that occur after a pain-free period. This differentiation hinges on a life-time absence of low back pain at first onset and short-term absence for further episodes. In this systematic review, we explored whether researchers make these distinctions when investigating the causality of LBP.

Methods   A literature search of PUBMED, CINAHL, and SCOPUS databases was performed from January 2010 until September 2016 using the search terms ‘low back pain’ or ‘back pain’ and ‘risk factor’ or ‘caus*’ or ‘predict*’ or ‘onset’ or ‘first-time’ or ‘inception’ or ‘incidence’. Two reviewers extracted information on study design, types of episodes of back pain to distinguish the disease of LBP and recurring episodes, and also to determine the definitions of disease- or pain-free periods.

Results   Thirty-three articles purporting to study causes of LBP were included. Upon scrutiny, 31 of the 33 articles were unclear as to what type of causality they were studying, that of the ‘disease’ or the episode, or a mere association with LBP. Only 9 studies used a prospective study design. Five studies appeared to investigate the onset of the disease of LBP, however, only one study truly captured the first incidence of LBP, which was the result of sports injury. Six appeared to study episodes but only one clearly related to the concept of episodes. Therefore, among those 11 studies, nine included both first-time LBP and episodes of LBP. Consequently, 22 studies related to the prevalence of LBP, as they probably included a mixture of first-time, recurring and ongoing episodes without distinction.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Low Back Pain and Chiropractic Page
and the:

Clinical Prediction Rule Page

Continue reading Failure to Define Low Back Pain as a Disease or an Episode Renders Research on Causality Unsuitable

Patient-centered Professional Practice Models for Managing Low Back Pain in Older Adults

Patient-centered Professional Practice Models for Managing Low Back Pain in Older Adults: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   BMC Geriatr. 2017 (Oct 13); 17 (1): 235

Christine M. Goertz, Stacie A. Salsbury, Cynthia R. Long,
Robert D. Vining, Andrew A. Andresen, Maria A. Hondras,
Kevin J. Lyons, Lisa Z. Killinger, Fredric D. Wolinsky,
and Robert B. Wallace

Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research,
Palmer College of Chiropractic,
Davenport, IA, USA.


BACKGROUND:   Low back pain is a debilitating condition for older adults, who may seek healthcare from multiple providers. Few studies have evaluated impacts of different healthcare delivery models on back pain outcomes in this population. The purpose of this study was to compare clinical outcomes of older adults receiving back pain treatment under 3 professional practice models that included primary medical care with or without chiropractic care.

METHODS:   We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial with 131 community-dwelling, ambulatory older adults with subacute or chronic low back pain. Participants were randomly allocated to 12 weeks of individualized primary medical care (Medical Care), concurrent medical and chiropractic care (Dual Care), or medical and chiropractic care with enhanced interprofessional collaboration (Shared Care). Primary outcomes were low back pain intensity rated on the numerical rating scale and back-related disability measured with the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included clinical measures, adverse events, and patient satisfaction. Statistical analyses included mixed-effects regression models and general estimating equations.

RESULTS:   At 12 weeks, participants in all three treatment groups reported improvements in mean average low back pain intensity [Shared Care: 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0 to 2.6; Dual Care: 3.0; 95% CI 2.3 to 3.8; Medical Care: 2.3; 95% CI 1.5 to 3.2)] and back-related disability (Shared Care: 2.8; 95% CI 1.6 to 4.0; Dual Care: 2.5; 95% CI 1.3 to 3.7; Medical Care: 1.5; 95% CI 0.2 to 2.8). No statistically significant differences were noted between the three groups on the primary measures. Participants in both models that included chiropractic reported significantly better perceived low back pain improvement, overall health and quality of life, and greater satisfaction with healthcare services than patients who received medical care alone.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Low Back Pain and Chiropractic Page
and the:

Patient Satisfaction With Chiropractic Page

Continue reading Patient-centered Professional Practice Models for Managing Low Back Pain in Older Adults

Management of Back Pain-related Disorders in a Community With Limited Access to Health Care Services

Management of Back Pain-related Disorders in a Community With Limited Access to Health Care Services: A Description of Integration of Chiropractors as Service Providers

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2017 (Nov); 40 (9): 635–642

Peter C. Emary, DC, MSc, Amy L. Brown, DC,
Douglas F. Cameron, DC, Alexander F. Pessoa, DC, ICSSP,
Jennifer E. Bolton, PhD, MA Ed

Private Practice,
Cambridge, Ontario, Canada.


OBJECTIVE:   The purpose of this study was to evaluate a chiropractic service for back pain patients integrated within a publicly funded, multidisciplinary, primary care community health center in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada.

METHODS:   Patients consulting for back pain of any duration were referred by their medical doctor or nurse practitioner for chiropractic treatment at the community health center. Patients completed questionnaires at baseline and at discharge from the service. Data were collected prospectively on consecutive patients between January 2014 and January 2016.

RESULTS:   Questionnaire data were obtained from 93 patients. The mean age of the sample was 49.0 ± 16.27 years, and 66% were unemployed. More than three-quarters (77%) had had their back pain for more than a month, and 68% described it as constant. According to the Bournemouth Questionnaire, Bothersomeness, and global improvement scales, a majority (63%, 74%, and 93%, respectively) reported improvement at discharge, and most (82%) reported a significant reduction in pain medication. More than three-quarters (77%) did not visit their primary care provider while under chiropractic care, and almost all (93%) were satisfied with the service. According to the EuroQol 5 Domain questionnaire, more than one-third of patients (39%) also reported improvement in their general health state at discharge.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Integrated Health Care Page and the:

Low Back Pain and Chiropractic Page

Continue reading Management of Back Pain-related Disorders in a Community With Limited Access to Health Care Services

The Quality of Life of Children Under Chiropractic Care Using PROMIS-25

The Quality of Life of Children Under Chiropractic Care Using PROMIS-25: Results from a Practice-Based Research Network

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Altern Complement Med. 2017 (Dec 20) [Epub]

Joel Alcantara, DC, Andrea E. Lamont, PhD,
Jeanne Ohm, DC, and Junjoe Alcantara, DC

The International Chiropractic Pediatric Association,
327N Middletown Road
Media, PA 610-565-2360


OBJECTIVES:   To characterize pediatric chiropractic and assess pediatric quality of life (QoL).

DESIGN:   A prospective cohort. Setting/Locations: Individual offices within a practice-based research network located throughout the United States.

SUBJECTS:   A convenience sample of children (8-17 years) under chiropractic care and their parents.

EXPOSURE:   Chiropractic spinal adjustments and adjunctive therapies.

OUTCOME MEASURES:   Survey instrument measuring sociodemographic information and correlates from the clinical encounter along with the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)-25 to measure QoL (i.e., depression, anxiety, and pain interference). Sociodemographic and clinical correlates were analyzed using descriptive statistics (i.e., frequencies/percentages, means, and standard deviations). The PROMIS-25 data were analyzed using scoring manuals, converting raw scores to T score metric (mean = 50; SD = 10). A generalized linear mixed model was utilized to examine covariates (i.e., sex, number of visits, and motivation for care) that may have played an important role on the PROMIS outcome.

RESULTS:   The original data set consisted of 915 parent-child dyads. After data cleaning, a total of 881 parents (747 females, 134 males; mean age = 42.03 years) and 881 children (467 females and 414 males; mean age = 12.49 years) comprised this study population. The parents were highly educated and presented their child for mainly wellness care. The mean number of days and patient visits from baseline to comparative QoL measures was 38.12 days and 2.74 (SD = 2.61), respectively. After controlling for the effects of motivation for care, patient visits, duration of complaint, sex, and pain rating, significant differences were observed in the probability of experiencing problems (vs. no reported problems) across all QoL domains (Wald = 82.897, df = 4, p < 0.05). Post hoc comparisons demonstrated the children were less likely to report any symptoms of depression (Wald = 6.1474, df = 1, p < 0.05), anxiety (Wald = 20.603, df = 1, p < 0.05), fatigue (Wald = 22.191, df = 1, p < 0.05), and pain interference (Wald = 47.422, df = 1, p < 0.05) after a trial of chiropractic care.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Pediatrics Section and the:

Outcome Assessment Page

Continue reading The Quality of Life of Children Under Chiropractic Care Using PROMIS-25

Impact of Musculoskeletal Pain on Balance and Concerns of Falling in Mobility-limited, Community-dwelling Danes over 75 Years of Age

Impact of Musculoskeletal Pain on Balance and Concerns of Falling in Mobility-limited, Community-dwelling Danes over 75 Years of Age: A Cross-sectional Study

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Aging Clin Exp Res. 2017 (Dec 11) [Epub]

Julie C. Kendall, Lars G. Hvid, Jan Hartvigsen,
Azharuddin Fazalbhoy, Michael F. Azari,
Mathias Skjødt, Stephen R. Robinson, Paolo Caserotti

School of Health and Biomedical Sciences,
RMIT University,
PO Box 71,
Bundoora, Melbourne, 3083, VIC, Australia.


BACKGROUND:   In older adults, musculoskeletal pain is associated with increased concerns of falling, reduced balance and increased occurrence of falls. In younger adults, the intensity of neck pain and low back pain is associated with increased postural sway. It is not known if pain further impairs balance and concerns of falling in mobility-limited older adults, and if so, whether this is associated with different intensities of pain.

OBJECTIVE:   This study examined whether mobility-limited older adults with mild or intense neck pain and/or low back pain have significantly increased postural sway as measured by centre of pressure (COP) changes and concerns of falling compared to those without pain.

METHODS:   48 older adults with a gait speed of < 0.9 m/s from Odense, Denmark were recruited through the public health service. Self-reported neck pain, low back pain, and concerns of falling were recorded on questionnaires. Sway range, velocity and area were recorded on a force plate in a comfortable standing stance. Pain intensity was rated on an 11 point numerical rating scale (0-10). Participants were sub-grouped into mild (0-4) and intense (> 5) neck pain or low back pain.

RESULTS:   Intense neck pain was associated with increased anterior-posterior sway range and area of sway. Intense low back pain was associated with increased concerns of falling.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic and Senior Care Page and the:

Low Back Pain and Chiropractic Page

Continue reading Impact of Musculoskeletal Pain on Balance and Concerns of Falling in Mobility-limited, Community-dwelling Danes over 75 Years of Age

The Use of the RAND VSQ9 to Measure the Quality of Life and Visit-Specific Satisfaction of Pregnant Patients

The Use of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System and the RAND VSQ9 to Measure the Quality of Life and Visit-Specific Satisfaction of Pregnant Patients Under Chiropractic Care Utilizing the Webster Technique

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Altern Complement Med. 2017 (Dec 20) [Epub]

Joel Alcantara, Andrea Lamont Nazarenko,
Jeanne Ohm, and Junjoe Alcantara

The International Chiropractic Pediatric Association,
Media, PA.


OBJECTIVE:   To quantify the quality of life (QoL) and visit-specific satisfaction of pregnant women.

DESIGN:   A prospective cohort within a practice-based research network (PBRN). Setting/locations: Individual chiropractic offices.

SUBJECTS:   Pregnant women (age ≥18 years) attending chiropractic care.

INTERVENTION(S):   Chiropractic care (i.e., The Webster Technique, spinal adjustments, and adjunctive therapies).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:   The RAND VSQ9 to measure visit-specific satisfaction and the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®)-29 to measure QoL.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Pediatrics Section and the:

Outcome Assessment Page

Continue reading The Use of the RAND VSQ9 to Measure the Quality of Life and Visit-Specific Satisfaction of Pregnant Patients

12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS (2017) ~ Day 11

12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS ~ Day 11

The Chiro.Org Blog


Joni Mitchell — River

12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS (2017) ~ Day 4

12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS ~ Day 4

The Chiro.Org Blog


Ray Charles — Merry Christmas Baby

Research Priorities of the Canadian Chiropractic Profession

Research Priorities of the Canadian Chiropractic Profession: A Consensus Study Using a Modified Delphi Technique

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2017 (Dec 12); 25: 38

Simon D. French, Peter J. H. Beliveau, Paul Bruno,
Steven R. Passmore, Jill A. Hayden, John Srbely
and Greg N. Kawchuk

School of Rehabilitation Therapy,
Queen’s University


Background   Research funds are limited and a healthcare profession that supports research activity should establish research priority areas. The study objective was to identify research priority areas for the Canadian chiropractic profession, and for stakeholders in the chiropractic profession to rank these in order of importance.

Methods   We conducted a modified Delphi consensus study between August 2015 and May 2017 to determine the views of Canadian chiropractic organisations (e.g. Canadian Chiropractic Association; provincial associations) and stakeholder groups (e.g. chiropractic educational institutions; researchers). Participants completed three online Delphi survey rounds. In Round 1, participants suggested research areas within four broad research themes:

1)   Basic science;
2)   Clinical;
3)   Health services; and
4)   Population health.

In Round 2, researchers created sub-themes by categorising the areas suggested in Round 1, and participants judged the importance of the research sub-themes. We defined consensus as at least 70% of participants agreeing that a research area was “essential” or “very important”. In Round 3, results from Round 2 were presented to the participants to re-evaluate the importance of sub-themes. Finally, participants completed an online pairwise ranking activity to determine the rank order of the list of important research sub-themes.

Results   Fifty-seven participants, of 85 people invited, completed Round 1 (response rate 67%). Fifty-six participants completed Round 2, 55 completed Round 3, and 53 completed the ranking activity. After three Delphi rounds and the pairwise ranking activity was completed, the ranked list of research sub-themes considered important were:

1)   Integration of chiropractic care into multidisciplinary settings;
2)   Costs and cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care;
3)   Effect of chiropractic care on reducing medical services;
4)   Effects of chiropractic care;
5)   Safety/side effects of chiropractic care;
6)   Chiropractic care for older adults;
7)   Neurophysiological mechanisms and
       effects of spinal manipulative therapy;
8)   General mechanisms and effects of spinal manipulative therapy.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Research Agenda Page

Continue reading Research Priorities of the Canadian Chiropractic Profession

$14 Million Research Grant Puts SMT in the Spotlight

$14 Million Research Grant Puts SMT in the Spotlight

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic 2017 (Nov); 35 (11)


  Landmark study could solidify DCs as the
  first line of care for acute LBP.  

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $14 million grant to the University of Minnesota and University of Washington to study the benefits of spinal manipulation for back pain vs. standard medical care (including prescription medication).

Touted as one of the largest back pain studies ever funded by the NIH’s National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, the national, multi-site clinical trial will feature a multidisciplinary research team from the chiropractic, medical, osteopathic, physical therapy and psychology fields, representing a half-dozen universities.

Participating researchers hail from the University of Minnesota (whose
Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality & Healing received the bulk of the NIH award for the clinical trial, which will be conducted at the University of Minnesota and the University of Pittsburgh – two of the leading research-based universities in the U.S.), the University of Washington (which received the remaining funds for data management / statistical support), Oregon Health and Sciences University, Duke University, and the University of North Texas.

The “Spinal Manipulation and Patient Self-Management for Preventing Acute to Chronic Back Pain Trial” will compare spinal manipulative therapy and supported self-management vs. usual medical care (including prescription medications). Supported self-care includes behavioral and copies strategies, mind-body approaches, lifestyle advice, and pain education – all designed to address the biopsychosocial aspects of back pain. Nearly 1,200 patients will be enrolled in the study beginning next spring.

Gert Brontfort, DC, PhD, a professor in the Bakken Center’s Integrative Health and Wellbeing Research Program, will serve as lead investigator on the study. Other doctors of chiropractic involved in the study include the University of Pittsburgh’s Michael Schneider, DC, PhD (co-principal investigator for the Clinical Coordinating Center, which will conduct the clinical trial) and Joel Stevens, DC, PhD; Roni Evans, DC, PhD (who directs the Integrative Health and Wellbeing Research Program at the University of Minnesota Bakken Center), and Brent Leininger, DC, MS, also from the U. of Minnesota.

The Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality & Healing is partially funded by the NCMIC Foundation. According to Mary Jo Kreitzer, PhD, RN, FAAN, a professor in the School of Nursing at the U. of Minnesota and director of the Bakken Center, “The support of NCMIC Foundation has been pivotal to helping the Center establish a world-class research program in chiropractic and integrative health from the influential platform of a prestigious land-grant university. It has also helped us to advance future research affiliations.”


The Chiropractic Perspective:
Q&A With Drs. Brontfort and Evans

Continue reading $14 Million Research Grant Puts SMT in the Spotlight

Harvard Endorses Chiropractic

Harvard Endorses Chiropractic

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic 2017 (Deec); 35 (12)

By Donald M. Petersen Jr., BS, HCD(hc), FICC(h)


Harvard Health Publishing is an arm of the prestigious Harvard Medical School. The publisher’s tag line is “Trusted advice for a healthier life.” Probably the most popular Harvard Health publication is the Harvard Health Letter, which you’ve probably seen or heard referenced.

The Harvard Medical School is one of the more notable exceptions to the rule that medical establishments are generally anti-chiropractic. You may have seen its Special Health Report “Pain Relief: Natural and Alternative Remedies Without Drugs or Surgery,” published in 2015. [1]

While certainly not as all-encompassing as one would have hoped for, the report not only features a section on chiropractic, but also includes chiropractic in the low back pain section, as well as two patient “stories.” The first story (“Gary’s Story: A Journey to Pain Relief”) talks about Gary’s primary MD referring him to a chiropractor. The second story (“Alice’s Story: A Comprehensive Approach to Pain Relief”) talks about how Alice has been using chiropractic, along with other nondrug interventions, for years with positive results.

Last month the Harvard Health Letter featured an article: “Where to Turn for Low Back Pain Relief.” The article’s deck answers the question: “In most cases, a primary care doctor or chiropractor can help resolve the problem.” [2]

Under the section titled “Where to Turn,” we read that for people suffering from back pain, their first call should be to a primary care physician or a chiropractor. Dr. Matthew Kowalski, a DC at Harvard’s Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, is quoted as saying that 35-42 percent of people experiencing their first episode of back pain consult a doctor of chiropractic.

The report concludes by reminding patients that most common back pain issues will be effectively addressed by a primary care MD or a chiropractor. It also references Harvard’s 2014 report on back pain (which also includes information about chiropractic).

There are many observations that immediately come to mind when reading this 2017 report.

Here are my top three:

Continue reading Harvard Endorses Chiropractic

Plasmacytoma of the Cervical Spine

Plasmacytoma of the Cervical Spine: A Case Study

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Chiropractic Medicine 2017 (Jun); 16 (2): 170–174

Richard Pashayan, DC, DABCO, CCSP,
Wesley M. Cavanaugh, DC,
Chad D. Warshel, DC, DACBR, and
David R. Payne, MD

Private Practice,
Flushing, NY.


OBJECTIVE:   The purpose of this case study is to describe the presentation of a patient with plasmacytoma.

CLINICAL FEATURES:   A 49-year-old man presented with progressive neck pain, stiffness, and dysphagia to a chiropractic office. A radiograph indicated a plasmacytoma at C3 vertebral body. The lesion was expansile and caused a mass effect anteriorly on the esophagus and posteriorly on the spinal cord. Neurologic compromise was noted with fasciculations and hypesthesia in the right forearm. The patient was referred to a neurosurgeon.

INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME:   Surgical resection of the tumor was performed with a vertebral body spacer and surrounding titanium cage. Bony fusion was initiated by inserting bone grafts from the iliac crests into the titanium cage. Additional laboratory analysis and advanced imaging confirmed that the plasmacytoma had progressed to multiple myeloma and radiation and chemotherapy were also necessary.

There are other articles like this @ our:

Case Reports Section

Continue reading Plasmacytoma of the Cervical Spine

Chiropractic Management for US Female Veterans With Low Back Pain

Chiropractic Management for US Female Veterans
With Low Back Pain: A Retrospective Study
of Clinical Outcomes

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2017 (Oct); 40 (8): 573–579

Kelsey L. Corcoran, DC, Andrew S. Dunn, DC, MEd, MS,
Lance R. Formolo, DC, MS, Gregory P. Beehler, PhD, MA

Chiropractic Department,
Medical Care Line,
VA Western New York,
Buffalo, New York


OBJECTIVE:   The purpose of this study was to determine if female US veterans had clinically significant improvement in low back pain after chiropractic management.

METHODS:   This is a retrospective chart review of 70 courses of care for female veterans with a chief complaint of low back pain who received chiropractic management through the VA Western New York Healthcare System in Buffalo, New York. A paired t test was used to compare baseline and discharge outcomes for the Back Bournemouth Questionnaire. The minimum clinically important difference was set as a 30% improvement in the outcome measure from baseline to discharge.

RESULTS:   The average patient was 44.8 years old, overweight (body mass index 29.1 kg/m2), and white (86%). The mean number of chiropractic treatments was 7.9. Statistical significance was found for the Back Bournemouth Questionnaire outcomes. The mean raw score improvement was 12.4 points (P < .001), representing a 27.3% change from baseline with 47% of courses of care meeting or exceeding the minimum clinically important difference.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Care For Veterans Page

Continue reading Chiropractic Management for US Female Veterans With Low Back Pain

What Is Chiropractic?

What Is Chiropractic?

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2017 (Nov 2); 25: 30

Jan Hartvigsen and Simon French

Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics,
University of Southern Denmark,
Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M, Denmark.


While in some jurisdictions chiropractic is fully integrated in public and insurance funded health care systems, in others it is outside and considered as complementary or alternative health care. There is a paucity of data and rigorous scientific studies regarding most aspects of chiropractic practice although research activity has been increasing in recent years. We call for papers for a thematic series in Chiropractic and Manual Therapies that can help define chiropractic better to stakeholders inside and outside the profession under the theme What is Chiropractic?

KEYWORDS:   Chiropractic; Editorial; Health policy


From the Full-Text Article:

Background

In 2002, Meeker and Haldeman wrote that “In today’s dynamic health care milieu, chiropractic stands at the crossroads of mainstream and alternative medicine”. [1] Fifteen years later the global identity and place for chiropractic in healthcare is still unresolved. From within chiropractic, one end of the spectrum subscribes to “a philosophy of neo-vitalism” and “a neurologically-centered model of subluxation” [2], while the other end promotes that “chiropractic education should be ……… founded on the principles of evidence-based care” and “the teaching of vertebral subluxation complex as a vitalistic construct that claims that it is the cause of disease is unsupported by evidence”. [3]

There are more articles like this @ our:

The Chiropractic Identity Page

Continue reading What Is Chiropractic?