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Is Resveratrol The Fountain of Youth?

Although some of the e-mail I received lately regarding Resveratrol sounds like hyperbole, there is a lot of research demonstrating that resveratrol does switch on the SIR1 genes, thus extending lifespans in lower species.

Studies also show a favorable reduction in other health risks including diabetes, vascular disease, and various forms of cancer. So…the real question is…if you didn’t die (prematurely) from these “top killers”, would you live longer? Only time will tell.

Review the Nutrition Section for research supporting the use of other vitamins, minerals and herbs.

6 comments to Is Resveratrol The Fountain of Youth?

  • Trey Morlene

    The studies that were released from Sirtris seems very promising although there is a new round of testing coming soon for cancer effects with resveratrol administration. They have already ran a test for certain type 2 Diabetes patients and the results were interesting to say the least.

  • I have been using Resveratrol now for 6 months. The research looks promising and its cheap enough compared to things like coenzyme Q10

  • Just saw some new studies on resveratrol done in 2010 — anti-cancer, increased cerebral blood flow, and several others. It continues to look good.

  • While it’s unlikely that any one substance is a “magic bullet,” resveratrol seems promising. It has long been conjectured that drinking red wine is good for your health and good for your heart, since it may help prevent heart disease by protecting against arterial damage and increasing levels of “good” cholesterol. That could explain why Italians have less heart disease.

  • Seattle,

    I agree. The big problem with much of medicine’s research into nutrition is that they test them like they were experimental drugs.

    The largest data base on nutritional behaviors and health outcomes is the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), which has been gathering demographic and blood testing since the 1960s.

    NHANES clearly demonstrates that those who eat the MOST fruits and vegetables have the lowest incidence of cancer, vascular disease (heart or stroke), or diabetes. Those are the TOP killers.

    This makes it very clear that it is the ABSENCE of nutrients that contributes to disease. So it’s reasonable to take supplements along with a good diet, because so few people actually eat the recommended servings of fruits and vegetables.

    Supplements are NOT a silver bullet, but if you carefully take a wide spectrum of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, you improve your odds. That’s a deal I can live with (excuse the pun!)

  • Frank,
    It is a deal I can live with too!

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