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Monthly Archives: September 2009

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Adjustment of Lower Extremity Joint Subluxation-Fixations

By |September 30, 2009|Diagnosis, Education|

Adjustment of Lower Extremity Joint Subluxation-Fixations

The Chiro.Org Blog


We would all like to thank Dr. Richard C. Schafer, DC, PhD, FICC for his lifetime commitment to the profession. In the future we will continue to add materials from RC’s copyrighted books for your use.

This is Chapter 1 from RC’s best-selling book:

“Lower Extremity Technique”

These materials are provided as a service to our profession. There is no charge for individuals to copy and file these materials. However, they cannot be sold or used in any group or commercial venture without written permission from ACAPress.


Chapter 1:   Adjustment of Lower Extremity Joint Subluxation-Fixations

This chapter describes adjustive therapy as it applies to articular malpositions of the proximal femur, knee, ankle, and foot. Manipulations to free areas of fixation are also explained.

INTRODUCTION

Articular disorders of the lower extremities are quite common, both as primary and secondary disorders, and may have far-reaching effects. For example, the hip works as a functional unit with the pelvis and indirectly the lumbar spine, as well as the knee, ankle, and foot, which have a direct influence on both adjacent segments and body structure as a whole.

The knee is the largest joint of the body, and it is fairly centered between long bones above and below. Thus, it is frequently subjected to strong leverage forces. Without much soft-tissue protection, the knee is easily subject to trauma; however, this same attribute offers helpful bony landmarks that are easily palpable.

Total body weight from above is transmitted downward to the leg, ankle, and foot in the upright position, and this force is greatly multiplied in locomotion. Thus, the ankle and foot are uniquely affected by trauma and static deformities infrequently seen in other areas of the body. For most clinical purposes, the lower leg, ankle, and foot can be considered to work as a dynamic unit.

     Screening Tests for the Lower Extremity as a Whole (more…)

What are our priorities?

By |September 29, 2009|News, Uncategorized|

Where is the money going? A couple of recent articles on the Dynamic Chiropractic website provide the answer.

End of an Era: FCER Decides on Self-Liquidation announces that “The Foundation for Chiropractic Education and Research (FCER) will self-liquidate, meaning the organization will cease operations after serving the chiropractic profession for more than 60 years. The FCER Board of Trustees made the difficult decision after numerous efforts to find another organization that could take over the foundation’s efforts on behalf of the profession.
When interviewed FCER President Dr. Charles Herring said that over the years, large contributors have not continued supporting FCER at the level they once did and the current economic crisis that began to emerge in late 2008 has resulted in significant decreases in individual membership renewals. This has made FCER unsustainable from a financial standpoint.”

On the other hand, another article in Dynamic Chiropractic, Foundation for Chiropractic Progress Receives Record Pledge Support reports that “a $500,000 donation from Standard Process highlighted the record financial support received by the Foundation for Chiropractic Progress (FCP) at the Florida Chiropractic Association 2009 national convention and expo in Orlando.
All told, the foundation received approximately $650,000 in pledges, including the surprise donation from Standard Process, which will be staggered over the next five years.”

The mission of the Foundation for Chiropractic Progress is “To increase the public awareness of the benefits of chiropractic.” I’m all for that but perhaps we could channel some of those funds back into research thereby increasing our credibility and making chiropractic an ‘easier sell’.

Introduction to Symptomatology

By |September 28, 2009|Diagnosis, Education|

Introduction to Symptomatology

The Chiro.Org Blog


We would all like to thank Dr. Richard C. Schafer, DC, PhD, FICC for his lifetime commitment to the profession. In the future we will continue to add materials from RC’s copyrighted books for your use.

This is Chapter 1 from RC’s best-selling book:

“Symptomatology and Differential Diagnosis”

These materials are provided as a service to our profession. There is no charge for individuals to copy and file these materials. However, they cannot be sold or used in any group or commercial venture without written permission from ACAPress.


Chapter 1:   Introduction to Symptomatology

Diagnosis is the determination of the nature of a patient’s state of health. It is the sole means by which a doctor can rationally suggest the direction of treatment or referral.

The position of the Council on Chiropractic Education (CCE) is that a doctor of chiropractic, as a member of the healing arts, is a physician concerned with the health needs of the public. He or she gives particular attention to the relationship of the structural and neurologic aspects of the body in health and disease. Serving as a portal of entry to the health-delivery system, the chiropractic physician must be well trained to diagnose, including, but not limited to, spinal analysis; to care for the human body in health and disease; and to consult with, or refer to, other health-care providers.

With respect to diagnosis, the position of the CCE is that appropriate evaluative procedures must be undertaken by the chiropractic physician prior to the initiation of patient care. There must be proper and necessary examination procedures, including recording of patient and family history, presenting complaint, subjective symptoms, objective findings, and skeletal-biomechanical and subluxation evaluation. And, when clinically necessary, such procedures as clinical laboratory tests, instrumentation reports, psychologic evaluation, roentgenographic examinations, and such other procedures should be performed as may be indicated. These findings must be correlated, and a conclusion, a diagnosis, or clinical impressions should be established.

This chapter describes the basic clinical approach used in this manual. The roles of diagnosis and symptomatology in clinical practice are defined. The goals and criteria of case histories and clinical profiles are reviewed. The gross framework for interpreting symptoms and signs is described. An overview of basic chiropractic philosophy is presented. And a simplified approach to differential diagnosis is recommended. (more…)

Whiplash Trauma and “New School” Isometrics

By |September 25, 2009|Education|

Whiplash Trauma and “New School” Isometrics

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic

By Jeffrey Tucker, DC, DACRB


When I was in chiropractic college more than 25 years ago, I was taught to use isometric exercises for whiplash trauma recovery. The technique was pretty simple: Place one hand on the back of your head and push the hand and the head against each other. Keep the neck in a neutral position and don’t let the head move backward. Build up to tension in 2 seconds, hold the tension for 6 seconds and gradually relax over 2 seconds, and then repeat for 10 reps. The exercise was also performed in flexion, rotation and lateral bending.

This form of exercise involves the static contraction of a muscle without any visible movement in the angle of the joint; the length of the muscle does not change. We’ll call that technique “old school” because the old German model (Hettinger and Muller) of 6-second actions was used in the original experiments and was adequate for strength gains, but was insufficient to cause hypertrophy in muscles. If you were looking to get big, this was not the technique.

(more…)

An Introduction to the Principles of Chiropractic

By |September 24, 2009|Diagnosis, Education, Spinal Manipulation, Subluxation|

An Introduction to the Principles of Chiropractic

The Chiro.Org Blog


We would all like to thank Dr. Richard C. Schafer, DC, PhD, FICC for his lifetime commitment to the profession. In the future we will continue to add materials from RC’s copyrighted books for your use.

This is Chapter 1 from RC’s best-selling book:

“Basic Principles of Chiropractic Neuroscience”

These materials are provided as a service to our profession. There is no charge for individuals to copy and file these materials. However, they cannot be sold or used in any group or commercial venture without written permission from ACAPress.


Chapter 1:   An Introduction to the Principles of Chiropractic

by Frank Zolli, D.C.

Chiropractic is that branch of the healing arts which is composed of a distinct philosophy, art, and science. Art and science may lead the practitioner to answer how and where to treat a patient, but it is the principles of chiropractic philosophy that give purpose to the adjustment. The principles of chiropractic answer the question Why?

      NATURE AND SCIENCE

It has long been recognized that nature is much smarter than man. However, this fact has somehow been lost in the wake of the technologic advances that have engulfed man. This is not to say that progress should not be achieved, nor is it an argument for the maintenance of the status quo.

A prime characteristic of life is the ability of an organism to change and adapt to its environment. This adaptation mechanism is a basic component of chiropractic thought. However, as happen in any changes that occur, there are benefits and liabilities that are the direct result of these changes.

Science that exists for the sake of science, with little or no attention to the sociologic complications of its actions, may produce change. It may even produce progress, but at what cost? A world that is enhanced by nuclear power but unable to deal efficiently with the potential of a nuclear disaster is a world of fear and confusion. Perhaps if science could be sensitive to the community of people that it serves, the progress it achieves will be better integrated in the day-to-day living of the public.

Likewise, other institutions must meet the challenge of confronting technologic change and incorporating it into our daily living. Church and state should grow and evaluate its positions regarding those ideas that have long been the core of its policies. Change that is essential to an organism must also be essential to the system within which the organism exists; otherwise, there is conflict. (more…)

Clinical Biomechanics: Body Alignment, Posture, and Gait

By |September 23, 2009|Diagnosis, Education, Gait Analysis, Posture|

Clinical Biomechanics:
Body Alignment, Posture, and Gait

The Chiro.Org Blog


We would all like to thank Dr. Richard C. Schafer, DC, PhD, FICC for his lifetime commitment to the profession. In the future we will continue to add materials from RC’s copyrighted books for your use.

This is Chapter 4 from RC’s best-selling book:

“Clinical Biomechanics:
Musculoskeletal Actions and Reactions”


Second Edition ~ Wiliams & Wilkins

These materials are provided as a service to our profession. There is no charge for individuals to copy and file these materials. However, they cannot be sold or used in any group or commercial venture without written permission from ACAPress.


Chapter 4:   Body Alignment, Posture, and Gait

With the background material offered in the basic principles of the musculoskeletal system, statics, dynamics, and joint stability, this chapter discusses how these factors are exhibited in body alignment and posture during static and dynamic positions.

Gravitational Effects

Improper body alignment limits function, and thus it is a concern of everyone regardless of occupation, activities, environment, body type, sex, or age. To effectively overcome postural problems, therapy must be based upon mechanical principles. In the absence of gross pathology, postural alignment is a homeostatic mechanism that can be voluntarily controlled to a significant extent by osseous adjustments, direct and reflex muscle techniques, support when advisable, therapeutic exercise, and kinesthetic training.

In the health sciences, body mechanics has often been separated from the physical examination. Because physicians have been poorly educated in biomechanics, most work that has been accomplished is to the credit of physical educators and a few biophysicists. Prior to recent decades, much of this had been met with indifference if not opposition from the medical profession.

Posture Analysis (more…)