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Monthly Archives: September 2010

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If Not Chiropractic Care, Then What’s Your Alternative?

By |September 25, 2010|Editorial, Iatrogenic Injury, NSAIDs|

If Not Chiropractic Care, Then What’s Your Alternative?

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   A Chiro.Org Editorial


Informed Consent involves discussing the risks and benefits of the treatment you propose (in my case, chiropractic) AND reviewing the risks and benefits of the alternatives, which are “conservative” medical care, which typically involves prescribing muscle relaxers, NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), and less frequently, prescribing physical therapy.

Many patients who present to a chiropractor for the first time have already gone the medical route, with minimal or negative results. Today I would like to review the risks associated with the most commonly recommended pain relieving analgesics (NASIDs).

(more…)

Do You Still Beat Your Wife?

By |September 20, 2010|Editorial, Stroke|

Do You Still Beat Your Wife?

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   A Chiro.Org Editorial


There are certain accusations that are impossible to respond to, without sounding like a guilty party, trying to weasel out of a tight spot.

The accusation that chiropractic somehow “causes stroke” is one such unsupported and yet impossible-to-defend claim.

The simple truth is that there is absolutely no scientific evidence to demonstrate that chiropractic adjusting in the cervical region has ever “caused” a stroke.

Here’s a simple example of how flawed that logic is:

If I sneeze, and there is a traffic accident down the street, it may be convenient to claim that the sneeze “caused” the accident (especially if you stand to benefit financially from that claim), but where is the evidence? (more…)

September 18th – Happy 115th Anniversary

By |September 18, 2010|History|

Harvey Lillard
These excerpts are taken directly from Dr. Joe Keating’s raw notes which can be found in the Chiro Org History Archive

  • 1895 (Sept): Chiropractic is “discovered” by D.D. Palmer (The Chiropractor, 1904, p. ii)
  • 1895 (Sept 18): “On September 18, 1895, Harvey Lillard called upon Dr. Palmer” (The Chiropractor, 1904, p. 11)
  • 1896 (Jan-Apr): According to Harvey Lillard’s testimonial in the January, 1897 issue (p. 3) of The Chiropractic, he didn’t learn of Palmer’s new science until January of 1896, and received two treatments for his deafness between January and April of 1896

DEAF SEVENTEEN YEARS
I was deaf 17 years and I expected to always remain so, for I had doctored a great deal without any benefit. I had long ago made up my mind to not take any more ear treatments, for it did me no good. Last January Dr. Palmer told me that my deafness came from an injury in my spine. This was new to me; but it is a fact that my back was injured at the time I went deaf. Dr. Palmer treated me on the spine; in two treatments I could hear quite well. That was eight months ago. My hearing remains good.
HARVEY LILLARD, 320 W. Eleventh St., Davenport, Iowa

UPDATE: Texas Judge Finally Rules on Diagnosis Issue

By |September 17, 2010|Diagnosis, News|

UPDATE: Texas Judge Finally Rules on Diagnosis Issue

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic ~ 9-17-2010


Put yourself in the position of a practicing doctor of chiropractic in Texas right about now (if you are one, this is easy).   With the Texas Medical Board and Texas Medical Association breathing down your neck, threatening to take away your right to diagnose (or even use the word diagnosis in your scope-of-practice act, claiming that by medical definition, the word is reserved for medical doctors and doctors of osteopathy), a Texas judge has ruled in your favor – depending on your perspective.

While Judge Stephen Yelenosky rejected the TMB/TMA reasoning that diagnosis does not apply to non-MD/DO providers, he did render the chiropractic scope-of-practice act null and void as currently written.   By all accounts, any rewrite will need to update the current language in the act, which does not include the word diagnosis (but according to the Texas Chiropractic Association and others, clearly implies it by stating that DCs can “analyze, examine and evaluate”).   It is unclear whether the revised scope will need to satisfy Judge Yelenosky’s prior suggestion that chiropractic diagnosis should be limited to “the biomechanical condition of the spine and the musculoskeletal system.” (more…)

Chiropractic Associations Describe Chiropractic Care Using Conventional Terminology

By |September 16, 2010|Guidelines|

Source The American Chiropractic Association

The Council on Chiropractic Guidelines and Practice Parameters (CCGPP), with assistance from the American Chiropractic Association (ACA), has established terminology that describes chiropractic care using conventionally recognized terminology across the accepted continuum of care. The terminology was established by a formal consensus process conducted in early 2009.

The chiropractic profession is making great strides with integration among health care providers and insurers. Doctors of chiropractic now practice in many military and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) sites, in hospital settings and in a variety of integrated practice models. As our nation’s health care landscape changes and the primary care shortage becomes more acute, the stage will be set for even more integration of doctors of chiropractic among other health care providers—traditional and alternative. Therefore, it is vital that the scope of appropriate chiropractic care be clearly defined relative to overall patient case management. (more…)

The Concierge Practice

By |September 16, 2010|Health Care|

Sources:

Modern Medicine, How to set up a concierge practice
The Health Care Blog

Doc, you realize your office is a lot like Disney World,” an unhappy patient quipped to Mark R. Wheeler, an internist in Louisville. “It’s a three-hour wait for a 20-second ride.”

“That comment spoke volumes about what was going on in my practice,” says Wheeler. “I was always behind. My patients weren’t happy, and neither were my staff, my family, or me.”

Today, Wheeler is a changed man, calling his partner, internist John Varga, and himself “two of the luckiest physicians on the face of this earth.”

The turning point came last September when the two physicians officially opened OneMD—a retainer or concierge-style practice that caps the number of patients at 300 per doctor. In return for a $4,000 annual fee ($6,000 per couple), patients get 24/7 access, reduced in-office waiting time, house calls, an enhanced yearly health exam, and other gold-plated services not generally covered by insurers. About 200 patients to date have enrolled—and the practice is “right on the fringe” of profitability.

“We don’t claim to be practicing better medicine,” says Wheeler, “but the fact that we can spend more time with our patients means they’re going to get better care.” (more…)