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Monthly Archives: March 2011

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You Have Noticed…

By |March 31, 2011|Announcement|

You Have Noticed…

The Chiro.Org Blog


On the left-hand toolbar of our Blog the recent addition of links to the rest of our sections on the PAGES section.

When the Blog replaced our original home page, traffic to the Blog did increase…but, unfortunately at the cost of reduced traffic to the various sections which actually contain the thousands of research articles we have been collecting (in archive fashion) since 1995.

Because of Google, some of those isolated pages continue to increase traffic (like the Diagnosis Page, or the Outcome Assessment Page), but many other equally important pages like the Low Back Pain and Chiropractic page, the Whiplash Page, and Attention Deficit page have experienced diminished traffic, even though these pages are the principal respository for the research that matters to DCs. (more…)

WARNING: Conducting an Orchestra Can Cause Vertebral Artery Dissection and Stroke

By |March 29, 2011|Research, Safety, Stroke|

WARNING: Conducting an Orchestra Can Cause Vertebral Artery Dissection and Stroke

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases 2011 (Mar 24)


During the past decade, the issues of cerebrovascular accidents [CVAs] and spinal manipulation have become linked in a debate of ever-increasing intensity. A copious number of studies have investigated spinal manipulation as a putative causative factor of CVAs; however, a common theme among these is the failure to adequately explore the possibility that the majority of CVAs may be spontaneous, cumulative, or caused by factors other than spinal manipulation itself. The problem is only exacerbated by the sometimes hysterical reactions apparent in the mass media over the past three years in reaction to the flawed investigations. [1]

Previous studies have shown that vertebral artery dissections (VADs) have been “caused” by things as innocuous as:

Salon shampoos
Archery
Coughing
Dental procedure
Watching aircraft
Telephone call
Yawning
Bleeding nose
Overhead work (more…)

The Art of the Chiropractic Adjustment, Part VII

By |March 28, 2011|Education, Technique|

The Art of the Chiropractic Adjustment, Part VII

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic

By Richard C. Schafer, DC, FICC


This series has strived to define certain general principles that underlie almost all chiropractic adjustive technics. Parts I and II reviewed depth of drive, the articular snap, segmental distraction, timing, the advantages of placing the patient’s spine in an oval posture, correct table height, and patient positioning objectives.
Part III summarized the factor of time in the clinical approach and its underlying biomechanical principles of tissue viscoelasticity, fatigue, creep, and relaxation. Part IV and V reviewed the need to visualize the loading effects on articular cartilage, joint lubrication, action of the intra-articular synovial tabs, the articular planes, the fundamental types of contact, contact points and their options, securing the contact hand, and the direction of drive. Part VI offered a rationale on adjustive velocity, and this concluding column on this subject describes various types of adjustive thrusts.

Types of Adjustive Thrusts

Test Thrusts

Test thrusts are mild preliminary thrusts applied before an actual corrective thrust is delivered. They have a twofold purpose: first, to acquaint the adjuster with the structural resistance present and patient response to the pressure applied; second, to acquaint the patient with what to expect. Surprise lowers a patient’s pain threshold.

Leverage Thrusts (more…)

The Art of the Chiropractic Adjustment: Part VI

By |March 27, 2011|Education, Technique|

The Art of the Chiropractic Adjustment: Part VI

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic

By Richard C. Schafer, DC, FICC


You may also enjoy:

Part I and

Part II and

Part III and

Part IV and

Part V

The aim of this series is to define certain general principles that underlie almost all chiropractic adjustive technics. Parts I and II reviewed depth of drive, the articular snap, segmental distraction, timing the advantages of placing the patient’s spine in an oval posture, correct table height, and patient positioning objectives. Part III summarized the factor of time in the clinical approach and its underlying biomechanical principles of tissue viscoelasticity, fatigue, creep, and relaxation. Parts IV and V reviewed the need to visualize the loading effects on articular cartilage, joint lubrication, action of the intra-articular synovial tabs, the articular planes to deliver a corrective thrust most effectively. The fundamental types of contact, contact points and their options, securing the contact hand, and direction of drive were described. This column summarizes the rationale of adjustive velocity.
Background

One’s preference in technic can be clinically justified as long as biophysical and physiologic principles are followed. In health care, however, we are not dealing with purely mechanical principles. We are dealing with patients, sensitive human beings, who are often already in pain, and we should not wish to induce any more discomfort during a correction than is necessary.

Thrust technics applied to an articulation can be divided into two categories: low-velocity technics (LVTs) and high-velocity technics (HVTs), and each has various subdivisions depending on the joint being treated, its structural-functional state, and the primary and secondary objectives to be obtained. The term adjustment velocity refers to the speed at which the adjustive force is delivered.

In either low-velocity or high-velocity technics:

The force applied may be low, medium, or high.

The duration of the force may be brisk or sustained.

The amplitude (distance of articular motion) may be short, medium, or long.

The direction of the force may be straight or curving and/or perpendicular, parallel, or oblique to the articular plane.

Overlying soft-tissue tension may be mild, medium, or strong.

Primary or secondary leverage may be applied early, synchronized, or late.

Contralateral stabilization may or may not be necessary.

Thrust onset may be slow, medium, or abrupt.


Read the rest of this Full Text article now!


Is the Spinal Subluxation a Risk Factor?

By |March 25, 2011|Education, Subluxation|

Is the Spinal Subluxation a Risk Factor?

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic

By Meridel I. Gatterman, MA, DC, MEd


Risk factors come in a variety of distinctions, from those for cardiovascular disease and some forms of cancer to those less than life-threatening but nonetheless undesirable conditions affecting the quality of a person’s life. A risk factor causes a person to be particularly vulnerable to an unwanted, unpleasant or unhealthful event. Risk factors predispose individuals to developing specific conditions. It has been suggested spinal subluxation could be considered such a risk factor. [1]

Subluxation As a Risk Factor

The following questions should be examined if the concept of subluxation as a risk factor is considered:

  1. Is subluxation of one region of the spine a risk factor for different signs and symptoms as opposed to a subluxation in another spinal area?
  2. If so, does a subluxation in one area create a different syndrome than when it occurs in a different region?
  3. Does clinical observation suggest there are different subluxation syndromes associated with different spinal areas? [2]
  4. Does a subluxation in the upper cervical region cause a different syndrome than a subluxation in the lower cervical region, and does a subluxation of the sacroiliac joint cause a different syndrome than one at a costovertebral joint? Does a patient’s symptomatic complaints and observable signs lead you to suspect a subluxation of one spinal region as opposed to another?

Subluxation Syndromes (more…)

The Vertebral Subluxation Syndrome

By |March 24, 2011|Education, Subluxation|

The Vertebral Subluxation Syndrome

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic

By Meridel I. Gatterman, MA, DC, MEd


The term subluxation has been used to describe the lesion treated by chiropractors since its inception. D.D. Palmer [1] described it in 1910 as “a partial or incomplete separation, one in which the articulating surfaces remain in partial contact.” Because of confusion by other professions, some within the chiropractic profession would have us abandon the term.

Others have promoted a teaching paradigm: the vertebral subluxation complex (VSC), which has grouped various components in a model focused around the dynamic component of the subluxation. Based on the works of Homewood, [2] Janse, [3] and Faye, [4] this model began being taught at CMCC in the mid-1970s and was later popularizing through the Motion Palpation Institute. [5] Other authors have revised Faye’s early model. The vertebral subluxation complex forms a paradigm for teaching the basic principles of chiropractic theory. By taking the VSC model one step further, the vertebral subluxation syndrome can be used to describe the primary clinical entity treated by chiropractors. [6-9]

Syndrome has been traditionally used to describe the aggregate of signs and symptoms associated with any morbid process and constituting together the picture of disease. [10] The focus for chiropractors today should not remain the terminology used to describe the vertebral subluxation syndrome, but rather the specific mechanisms whereby this complex aggregate of signs and symptoms is produced by altered spinal joint motion.

Recently, the primary fibromyalgia syndrome has replaced the controversial term fibrositis used to describe a condition that has been written off as psychological at best, with the physiological manifestations either denied or ignored. [11] When the multiple complaints and varied systemic complaints of this condition were recognized as a syndrome, objective investigation was fostered to the benefit of the many patients suffering from the condition.

Viewing the classic chiropractic subluxation in a similar manner would allow us to develop and objectively test the diagnostic features of the vertebral subluxation syndrome.

There are more articles like this at our:

The Chiropractic Subluxation and Neurology Section


SOURCE:   Read the rest of this Full Text article now!