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Monthly Archives: March 2011

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Spinal Cord Processes Information Just as Areas of Brain Do, Research Finds

By |March 23, 2011|News|

“Basic physiology books describe the spinal cord as a relay system, but it’s part of the central nervous system and processes information just like parts of the brain do,” explains Dr. Stroman, director of the Queen’s MRI Facility and Canada Research Chair in Imaging Physics.

The technique involves capturing multiple images of the spinal cord using a conventional MRI system. The image capturing is repeated every few seconds over several minutes. During the imaging temperature sensations on the skin are varied allowing areas of the spinal cord that respond to the temperature changes to be detected in the MRI.

During their research, Dr. Stroman’s team was also surprised to discover that levels of attention impact information processing in the spinal cord. By examining the differences in spinal cord functioning in people who were either alert or distracted by a task they were able to see changes in the level of cord activity picked up by the MRI scanner.

“The effect of attention is one of the reasons that when you’re playing sports and you get hurt, you often don’t become aware of the injury until after the game when your attention and focus changes,” says Dr. Stroman. “We already knew that a person’s level of attention affects information processing in the brain, but this finding has made us aware that level of attention has to be properly controlled in research that aims to accurately map spinal cord function.”

Original Article

Recognizing Subdural Hemorrhage in Older Adults

By |March 20, 2011|Education|

Recognizing Subdural Hemorrhage in Older Adults

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Topics in Integrative Health Care 2010; 1 (2)

By: Mark T. Pfefer, RN, MS, DC and Richard Strunk MS, DC


The Abstract:

A subdural hematoma, also known as a subdural hemorrhage (SDH) is caused by a post-traumatic accumulation of blood within the potential space between the dura mater and the arachnoid layer covering the brain. Chronic SDH is much more common in the elderly. Patients can have a good outcome with neurosurgical management if the conditions is promptly recognized. All health care providers, as well as nursing home staff, should be aware of this condition because older patients presenting with headache and/or other neurologic complaints need careful assessment to identify SDH.

Keywords: subdural hematoma; subdural hemorrhage; chronic subdural hemorrhage; headache

Definition and Etiology

A subdural hematoma, also known as a subdural hemorrhage (SDH) is caused by a post-traumatic accumulation of blood within the potential space between the dura mater and the arachnoid layer covering the brain. All health care providers, especially those who frequently treat patients with musculoskeletal complaints, as well as nursing home staff, should be aware of this condition because older patients presenting with headache and/or other neurologic complaints need careful assessment. SDH should be considered in the differential assessment of any older patient presenting for care following trauma as it has been associated with minor head injury or falls, even those not involving direct trauma to the head. [1] In fact, absence of direct trauma to the head is associated with up to half of all cases of SDH, and a case has been reported in an adult following a roller coaster ride. [2] Based upon this it should be assumed that motor vehicle collisions could generate forces sufficient to cause SDH in older patients. (more…)

The Art of the Chiropractic Adjustment: Part V

By |March 20, 2011|Education, Technique|

The Art of the Chiropractic Adjustment: Part V

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE: Dynamic Chiropractic

By Richard C. Schafer, DC, FICC


You may also enjoy:

Part I and

Part II and

Part III and

Part IV and

Part VI

This series of articles has strived to define certain general principles that underlie almost all chiropractic adjustive technics. Parts I and II reviewed depth of drive, the articular snap, segmental distraction, timing the adjustment, the advantages of placing the patient’s spine in an oval posture, correct table height, and patient positioning objectives. Part III summarized the factor of time in the clinical approach and its underlying biomechanical principles of tissue viscoelasticity, fatigue, creep, and relaxation. Part IV reviewed the need to visualize the loading effects on articular cartilage, joint lubrication, action of the intra-articular synovial tabs, and the articular planes to deliver a corrective thrust most effectively. Here we shall describe the fundamental types of contact, contact points and their options, securing the contact hand and direction of drive.

Types of Contact

The type of contact used in applying a chiropractic adjustment is optional in most situations. The broadest contact that is efficient should be used, because the force will be directed through a larger surface area. For example, a force applied by a fairly open palm against the skin is perceived by the patient far differently than a force applied by a pointed finger against the skin. Thus, a palm-heel, thenar or knife-edge (medial edge of the hand) contact produces less patient discomfort than a pisiform or thumb contact. There are times, however, when a pisiform or thumb contract on a spinous process is necessary to get the job done quickly and efficiently.

Contact Points and Their Options (more…)

Got An Opinion on Tort Reform?

By |March 18, 2011|News, Tort Reform|

Got An Opinion on Tort Reform?

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   MedScape

NOTE: Registration is free on MedScape


Medscape’s new headline trumpets: “Tort Reform Bill Would Reduce Deficit by $40 Billion”. Sounds pretty intoxicating doesn’t it. Aren’t we all just dying to see the deficit shrivel down to where it was when Bill Clinton was in office? I sure am.

However, after reading several paragraphs, I am horrified to see the unreasonable limits they want to set on noneconomic damages. I have heard too many stories of amputations of the wrong limb to think that a pittance is a reasonable payout for sloppy workmanship. Read on:

Tort Reform Bill Would Reduce Deficit by $40 Billion

By: Robert Lowe

March 11, 2011 — A House bill that caps noneconomic damages in malpractice cases at $250,000 and enacts other reforms to curb frivolous lawsuits against clinicians would reduce the federal deficit by $40 billion from 2011 to 2021, according to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO).

The bill, called the Help Efficient, Accessible, Low-Cost Timely Healthcare (HEALTH) Act of 2011, would lower premiums for malpractice insurance and reduce the number of “defensive medicine” services ordered by clinicians to avoid getting sued, the CBO stated in an analysis released yesterday. As a result of these lower costs, direct federal spending on healthcare would decrease by $34 billion over 10 years.

In addition, lower costs on the provider side would cause premiums for private health insurance to fall, which would allow employers to increase taxable wages for employees. That, in turn, would boost federal tax revenue by roughly $6 billion. (more…)

New LBP Study Reveals Chiropractic Is Superior to PT and MD Care

By |March 17, 2011|Low Back Pain, Physical Therapy, Research|

New LBP Study Reveals Chiropractic Is Superior to PT and MD Care

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Occupational and Enviro Medicine 2011 (Mar 14)

Cifuentes M, Willetts J, Wasiak R.

The Center for Disability Research at the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety


This study is unique in that it was conducted by the Center for Disability Research at the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety and the University of Massachusetts Lowell, Hopkinton, Mass; and the Center for Health Economics & Science Policy at United BioSource Corporation, London, United Kingdom.

Their objective was to compare the occurrences of repeated disability episodes between types of health care providers, who treat claimants with new episodes of work-related low back pain (LBP). They followed 894 patients over 1-year, using workers’ compensation claims data.

By controlling for demographics and severity, they determined the hazard ratio (HR) for disability recurrence between 3 types of providers:
Physical Therapists (PT),
Physicians (MD), and
Chiropractors (DC).

The results are quite interesting: (more…)

ICPA Launches “Chiropractic Care and Wellness” Research Project

By |March 17, 2011|Announcement, Pediatrics, Research|

ICPA Launches “Chiropractic Care and Wellness” Research Project

The Chiro.Org Blog


The ICPA is pleased to announce that its Practice Based Research Network (PBRN) has achieved recognition by and affiliation with the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality, under the US Department of Health and Human Services.

The ICPA/ PBRN is the first chiropractic PBRN to have achieved this status. We would like to thank all of our participants so far for their contributions of data, making this possible.

A Practiced Based Research Network (PBRN) is our best opportunity to determine the parameters of care we provide by submitting data from our practices. The ICPA has formed the largest PBRN in chiropractic and the only one addressing family wellness care. This is your voice in evidenced based chiropractic care. We need your participation now! (more…)