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Monthly Archives: June 2011

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Federal Appeals Court Upholds Individual Mandate Requirement

By |June 29, 2011|Health Care Reform, News|

Federal Appeals Court Upholds Individual Mandate Requirement

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Medscape Medical News
NOTE: Enrollment on Medscape is Free


June 29, 2011 — A federal appeals court in Cincinnati, Ohio, today placed its constitutional stamp of approval on the linchpin of the embattled Affordable Care Act (ACA): the requirement that individuals either obtain health insurance coverage or pay a penalty.

Today’s decision is the first one on the federal appellate level regarding the healthcare reform law passed last year. So far, 2 federal district judges have declared the so-called individual mandate unconstitutional, saying that Congress has no right under the constitution’s commerce clause to regulate an individual’s economic “inactivity.” In contrast, 3 other federal district judges have agreed with the position of the Obama administration that uninsured “free riders” are indeed active participants in the healthcare marketplace, receiving free or subsidized services when needed, and driving up premiums and healthcare costs for others in the process.

The various district cases are now making their way through the federal appellate courts, with their final destination being the US Supreme Court. (more…)

WikiChiro Foundation Formed to Set the Record Straight on Chiropractic

By |June 28, 2011|News|

WikiChiro Foundation Formed to Set the Record Straight on Chiropractic

The Chiro.Org Blog


Doctors of chiropractic have long been dismayed by Wikipedia’s description(s) of the profession. In response, several DCs have formed the WikiChiro Foundation to provide a scientifically unbiased center for the public and for the profession to obtain the most current scientifically accurate information regarding the chiropractic profession. The Foundation will incorporate in New Jersey and file for 501C(iii) status as a charitable institution.

WikiChiro, unlike Medpedia or WebMD, will not accept advertisements or corporate money. All editors will have to identify themselves and reveal any conflicts of interest. Unlike certain medical sites, WikiChiro’s editors will not make derogatory statements about other health care professions. WikiChiro.org already boasts many of the foremost chiropractic research scientists from around the world.

WikiChiro is the brainchild of its chairman, Robert Press, MS (Comp. Sci), soon to be Dr. Robert Press. It was organized by his father, Dr. Stephen Press, of Englewood, N.J. Stephen Press, DC, PhD, is best known as the founder of the Fédération Internationalede Chiropratique du Sport (FICS)—)aks: the International Federation of Sports Chiropractic). (more…)

Chiropractic Cost-Effectiveness At Your Fingertips

By |June 26, 2011|Cost-Effectiveness, Research|

Chiropractic Cost-Effectiveness At Your Fingertips

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Virginia Chiropractic Association

The Path to Change in the US Healthcare System:
Chiropractic Cost-Effectiveness


The following is a collection of studies relating to the cost effectiveness and efficacy associated with chiropractic care and the procedures that doctors of chiropractic provide. The American Chiropractic Association, The International Chiropractic Association, The Congress of State Associations, and the Association of Chiropractic Colleges appreciate the opportunity to provide these materials for your review.


All These Articles And More Are Available On Our:
The Cost-Effectiveness of Chiropractic Page

BACKGROUND STUDIES: (Regarding Medical Management)

Prognosis in Patients With Recent Onset Low Back Pain in Australian Primary Care: Inception cohort study
British Medical Journal 2008 (Jul 7); 337: a171 ~ FULL TEXT

This study contradicts Clinical Practice Guidelines that suggest that recovery from an episode of recent onset low back pain is usually rapid and complete.   Their findings with 973 consecutive primary care patients was that recovery was slow for most patients, and almost 1/3 of patients did not recover within after one year, while following standard medical management. This study was designed to determine the one year prognosis of patients with low back pain. 973 patients with low back pain that had lasted less than 2 weeks completed a baseline questionnaire. Patients were reassessed through a phone interview at six weeks, three months and 12 months. The study found that the prognosis claimed in clinical guidelines was more favorable than the actual prognosis for the patients in the study.

(more…)

Plastic Surgery For Headaches???

By |June 20, 2011|Editorial, Headache|

Plastic Surgery For Headaches???

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery 2011 (Feb); 127 (2): 603-8

A Chiro.Org Editorial


Now I’ve heard everything (well. . . maybe). A recent full text article in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery [1] fully describes how plastic surgeons attempt to mimic the common outcome of chiropractic upper cervical adjusting by:

removal of a small segment of the semispinalis capitis muscle and shielding of the nerve with a subcutaneous flap to fully decompress the greater occipital nerve.
(from Page 604) [2]

No mention is made in their celebratory article about the massive expense of this procedure, or the success of chiropractic care (or “spinal manipulation”) for headaches, but then again, these are surgeons, forging ahead, looking for an approach they can call their own. Good for them.

However, Chiropractors developed a non-surgical and cost-effective way to decompress the greater occipital nerve many decades ago, by adjusting the occiput, and by using NIMMO technique to naturally eliminate trigger points of the suboccipital muscles (the myofascial component).


Travell’s 1983 landmark magnum opus on trigger points titled: “Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual” clearly identifies the various suboccipital muscles as being primary triggers for several varieties of headache. This Blog, and our Headache and Chiropractic Page have published regularly on the success of chiropractic care for headaches of all sorts. [2-7] (more…)

Musculoskeletal Development and Sports Injuries in Pediatric Patients

By |June 19, 2011|Diagnosis, Pediatrics, Sports|

Musculoskeletal Development and Sports Injuries in Pediatric Patients

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic

By Deborah Pate, DC, DACBR


Physical activity is extremely important for everyone, but especially for children. A well-designed exercise program enhances the physical and intellectual development of a child. Competitive sports are often a child’s first introduction to programmed exercise.

In the past decade, there has been an increase in the number of children participating in team and solo sports. Younger children are allowed to participate in sports for enjoyment, health and personal development. However, this changes as competitive elements become more dominant and young athletes train harder and longer, and may practice a sport throughout the whole year. Consequently, sports-related injuries in children have significantly increased.

To understand pediatric injuries that can occur during sports performance, it’s important to be aware of the peculiarities of the growing musculoskeletal system. Children’s tendons and ligaments are relatively stronger than the epiphyseal plate; therefore, with severe trauma the epiphyseal plate will give way before the ligament. However, children’s bones and muscles are more elastic and heal faster. At the peak period of adolescent linear growth, the musculoskeletal system is most vulnerable because of imbalances in strength and flexibility and changes in the biomechanical properties of bone.

Physiological loading is beneficial for bones, but excessive strains may produce serious injuries to joints. Low-intensity training can stimulate bone growth, but high-intensity training can inhibit it. Growth plate disturbances resulting from sports injuries can result in limb-length discrepancy, angular deformity or altered joint mechanics, possibly causing permanent disabilities. Sports involving contact and jumping have the highest injury levels.

Pediatric Musculoskeletal Growth

Chiropractors have been uniquely trained to understand the musculoskeletal system, making them excellent resources for the management of sports-injuries. We need only to make certain we are aware of the peculiarities of the pediatric musculoskeletal system when pursuing appropriate evaluation and case management. (more…)

The Pediatric Elbow: A Review of Fractures

By |June 18, 2011|Pediatrics, Radiology|

The Pediatric Elbow: A Review of Fractures

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic

By Deborah Pate, DC, DACBR


The elbow fracture is one of the most common fractures in children. Assessing the elbow for fracture can be difficult because of the changing anatomy of the growing skeleton and the subtlety of some of these fractures.

It’s important to be aware of the radiographic signs of fracture in the elbow, along with knowing the appearance and fusion of the ossification centers in the pediatric patient, to avoid confusing an ossification center with a fracture fragment. Of course, alignment and radiographic positioning are also extremely important in making a diagnostic assessment.


Diagram of a distended joint capsule
with the fat pads displaced.

When reviewing an X-ray study for trauma, it’s best to have a methodical way of viewing the study. Perform (at the very least) two views of the elbow at 90° to each other, AP and lateral. Positioning is very important, particularly in the growing skeleton. Alignment of the joint cannot be assessed unless the positioning is accurate.

The two most common errors in positioning are: 1) elbow is lower than the shoulder, which projects the capitellum onto the ulna; and 2) elbow is higher than the wrist, which will make the capitellum and the head of the radius appear anterior, and the epicondyle appear posterior, making it difficult to assess the alignment. In a true lateral view, the elbow and the shoulder should be in the same plane and the wrist should be higher than the elbow to compensate for the normal valgus position of the elbow. The thumb should be up to keep the radius from rotating. (more…)