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Daily Archives: July 10, 2011

Chiropractic Technique Review: Pierce Results System

By |July 10, 2011|Chiropractic Technique|

Chiropractic Technique Review: Pierce Results System

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiro.Org’s Technique Page


The Chiropractic Technique, known as the Pierce Results System, (formerly known as Pierce/Stillwagon, or PST) was developed by Vernon Pierce, D.C., Sr. It is a biomechanical analysis of spine kinematics (or spinal motion), utilizing “stress views” of the spine (flexion, extension, rotation, and/or lateral bending views where required) or videofluoroscopy (VF, or “moving x-ray” studies) to determine the loss of spinal function, which is at the core of the “vertebral subluxation complex”.

Structure and Function

Our spine is a “structural” unit. There are 4 curves to the spine. Loss of structural integrity and/or normal function of the spine is the basis for the evolution of the vertebral subluxation. Abnormal stresses occur in the facets, discs and supporting tissues when normal motion of the spine is impaired. The Pierce System analysis is aimed at locating the specific segments which are subluxated, as well as providing the means to “free” those segments.

When normal function returns, the neurologic and other components of the subluxation complex resolve by the normal healing power referred to historically as “innate intelligence” or “vis medicatrix naturae” (the healing power of Nature).

  Neutral Lateral Film Analysis:  

The picture on the left is an example of perfect cervical lordosis. All segments should be on Georges’s line (one curved line). There should be an even spacing between each spinous process. Positioning of the head and spine should also be assessed for anterior head placement (also known as Forward Head Posture). The normal cervical lordosis (which extends from C1 to T2) should have a 17-24 cm. radius, based on the patient’s height. This is easily measured with the AcuArc ruler. The posterior arch of Atlas should be centered in the space between occiput and the C2 spinous process. If C1’s posterior arch “crowds” occiput, it is labelled as an “inferior” Atlas. If it crowds C2, it is labelled “superior”. The normal Atlas Plane line would be 18-24 degrees superior to the bottom of the film. A line under the bottom of the C2 body (Whitehorn’s line) should be parallel with the floor.

  Flexion Film Analysis:  

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