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Daily Archives: January 23, 2012

Cervical Spine Trauma

By |January 23, 2012|Chiropractic Care, Education|

Cervical Spine Trauma

The Chiro.Org Blog


We would all like to thank Dr. Richard C. Schafer, DC, PhD, FICC for his lifetime commitment to the profession. In the future we will continue to add materials from RC’s copyrighted books for your use.

This is Chapter 4 from RC’s best-selling book:

“Chiropractic Posttraumatic Rehabilitation”

These materials are provided as a service to our profession. There is no charge for individuals to copy and file these materials. However, they cannot be sold or used in any group or commercial venture without written permission from ACAPress.


CHAPTER 4:   CERVICAL SPINE TRAUMA

The cervical spine provides musculoskeletal stability and supports for the cranium, and a flexible and protective column for movement, balance adaptation, and housing of the spinal cord and vertebral artery. It also allows for directional orientation of the eyes and ears. Nowhere in the spine is the relationship between the osseous structures and the surrounding neurologic and vascular beds as intimate or subject to disturbance as it is in the cervical region.

BACKGROUND

Whether induced by trauma or not, cervical subluxation syndromes may be reflected in total body habitus. IVF insults and the effects of articular fixations can manifest throughout the motor, sensory, and autonomic nervous systems. Many peripheral nerve symptoms in the shoulder, arm, and hand will find their origin in the cervical spine, as may numerous brainstem disorders.


COMMON INJURIES AND DISORDERS OF THE CERVICAL SPINE


Cervical spine injuries can be classified as

(1) mild (eg, contusions, strains);

(2) moderate (eg, subluxations, sprains, occult fractures, nerve contusions, neurapraxias);

(3) severe (eg, axonotmesis, dislocation, stable fracture without neurologic deficit); and

(4) dangerous (eg, unstable fracture-dislocation, spinal cord or nerve root injury).

Spasm of the sternocleidomastoideus and trapezius can be due to strain or irritation of the sensory fibers of the spinal accessory nerve as they exit with the C2—C4 spinal nerves. The C1 and C2 nerves are especially vulnerable because they do not have the protection of an IVF. Radicular symptoms are rarely evident unless an IVD protrusion or herniation is present.

PREVALENCE

Because of its great mobility and relatively small structures, the cervical spine is the most frequent site of severe spinal nerve injury and subluxations. A large variety of cervical contusions, Grade 1—3 strains and sprains, subluxations, disc syndromes, dislocations, and fractures will be seen as the result of trauma.

The most vulnerable segments to injury are the axis and C5—C6 according to accident statistics. Surprisingly, the atlas is the least involved of all cervical vertebrae. In terms of segmental structure, the vertebral arch (50%), vertebral body (30%), and IVD (30%) are most commonly involved in severe cervical trauma. While the anterior ligaments are only involved in 2% of injuries, the posterior ligaments are involved in 16% of injuries.

EMERGENCY CARE

In the emergency-care situation, the patient with spinal cord injury must be treated as if the spinal column were fractured, even when there is no external evidence. Immediate and obvious symptom of spinal cord injury parallel those of fractures of the spinal column. The establishment of an adequate airway takes priority over all other concerns except for spurting hemorrhage. (more…)