Chiro.org - Chiropractic Resource Organization.     Support Chiropractic Research!

Monthly Archives: February 2012

Home/2012/February

The Trials of Evidence: Interpreting Research and the Case for Chiropractic

By |February 29, 2012|Evidence-based Medicine, Health Promotion, Research|

The Trials of Evidence:
Interpreting Research and the Case for Chiropractic

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   The Chiropractic Report ~ July 2011


A.   Introduction

If you are a clinician at work in a typical chiropractic practice you see many patients with acute and chronic back pain, neck pain and headaches.

If you are making best efforts to keep up with the ongoing flood of research and evidence-informed clinical guidelines you can feel confident that the scientific evidence now supports your clinical experience that spinal manipulation specifically, and chiropractic management incorporating manual care generally, are very helpful for most patients with these complaints. Therefore for example:

  • For the great majority of patients with both acute and chronic low-back pain, namely those without diagnostic red flags, spinal manipulation is recommended by evidence-informed guidelines from many authoritative sources – whether chiropractic (the UK Evidence Report from Bronfort, Haas et al. [1]), medical (the 2007 Joint Clinical Practice Guideline from the American College of Physicians and the American Pain Society [2]) or interdisciplinary (the European Back Pain Guidelines [3]).

  • For the great majority of patients with acute and chronic neck pain, and those with cervicogenic headache, spinal manipulation is similarly recommended, most recently and authoritatively by the Bone and Joint Decade Neck Pain Task Force [4]. For headache, including migraine headaches, see evidence reviews and recommendations from the Evidence-Based Practice Center at Duke University [5] and Bryans Descarreaux et al. in Canada [6].


What are we to make, then, of a new systematic review for the Cochrane Collaboration, looking at chronic back pain and published last month in Spine? This is from Rubenstein, van Middelkoop et al., an experienced research team at the VU University, Amsterdam which includes noted epidemiologist Dr. Maurits van Tulder, so will attract attention. It concludes that the evidence suggests “there is no clinically relevant difference between spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) and other interventions for reducing pain and improving function in patients with chronic low-back pain”. [7]. (more…)

The Role of Chiropractic Care in Older Adults

By |February 26, 2012|Chiropractic Care, Health Care Reform, Research, Spinal Manipulation|

The Role of Chiropractic Care in Older Adults

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2012 (Feb 21), 20: 3

Paul E Dougherty, Cheryl Hawk, Debra K Weiner,
Brian Gleberzon, Kari Andrew, Lisa Killinger


There are a rising number of older adults; in the US alone nearly 20% of the population will be 65 or older by 2030. Chiropractic is one of the most frequently utilized types of complementary and alternative care by older adults, used by an estimated 5% of older adults in the U.S. annually. Chiropractic care involves many different types of interventions, including preventive strategies. This commentary by experts in the field of geriatrics, discusses the evidence for the use of spinal manipulative therapy, acupuncture, nutritional counseling and fall prevention strategies as delivered by doctors of chiropractic. Given the utilization of chiropractic services by the older adult, it is imperative that providers be familiar with the evidence for and the prudent use of different management strategies for older adults.

Introduction:

By 2030, nearly one in five U.S. residents is expected to be age 65 or older [1]. An estimated 14% of patients treated by doctors of chiropractic (DCs) are 65 and older [2]. The most common reason for an older adult to see a DC is musculoskeletal pain, most often lower back pain [3]. Although the most common reason for older adults seeking chiropractic care is for musculoskeletal symptoms, DCs may also provide a diverse range of services to these patients [4] .Given this fact, for the purpose of this manuscript chiropractic care will be defined as; “the provision by a doctor of chiropractic of services related to patient assessment, maintenance of health, prevention of illness, and treatment of illness or injury.” The focus of this manuscript is to describe the evidence for achievement of some of these goals in the older adult population. The purpose of this manuscript is to present an overview of information to the practicing chiropractor on utilization of specific management tools. This is not meant to be a systematic review of the literature or an evidence based guideline. The authors each have personal experience in evaluating and treating older adults as well as established expertise in research and publication in these areas. The authors recognize that there is a need for further research in the area of management of the older adult by DC’s and discuss in the conclusion future research considerations. (more…)

Chiropractic Research & Practice: State of the Art

By |February 24, 2012|Cost-Effectiveness, Evidence-based Medicine, Health Care Reform, Outcome Assessment, Patient Satisfaction, Prevention, Public Health, Research, Spinal Manipulation, Wellness Care|

Chiropractic Research & Practice
State of the Art

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Cleveland Chiropractic College

By Daniel Redwood, D.C., professor,
Cleveland Chiropractic College

Peer Reviewers: Carl S. Cleveland III, D.C., J.
Michael Flynn, D.C., Cheryl Hawk, D.C., PhD., and
Anthony Rosner, PhD.

©2010 Cleveland Chiropractic College –
Kansas City and Los Angeles


Chiropractic Research & Practice

State of the Art

Since chiropractic’s breakthrough decade in the 1970s — when the U.S. federal government included chiropractic services in Medicare and federal workers’ compensation coverage, approved the Council on Chiropractic Education (CCE) as the accrediting body for chiropractic colleges, and sponsored a National Institutes of Health (NIH) conference on the research status of spinal manipulation — the profession has grown and matured into an essential part of the nation’s healthcare system.

Chiropractic was born in the United States in the late 19th century and the U.S. is home to approximately 65,000 of the world’s 90,000 chiropractors. [1] The chiropractic profession is the third largest independent health profession in the Western world, after medicine and dentistry. Doctors of chiropractic are licensed throughout the English-speaking world and in many other nations as primary contact providers, licensed for both diagnosis and treatment without medical referral. In 2005, the World Health Organization (WHO) published WHO Guidelines on Basic Training and Safety in Chiropractic, which documented the status of chiropractic education and practice worldwide and sought to ensure high standards in nations where chiropractic is in the early stages of development. [2]

Rigorous educational standards are supervised by government-recognized accrediting agencies in many nations, including CCE in the United States. After fulfilling college science prerequisites similar to those required to enter medical schools, chiropractic students must complete a chiropractic college program of four academic years, which includes a wide range of courses in anatomy, physiology, pathology, and diagnosis, as well as spinal adjusting, physiotherapy, rehabilitation, public health and nutrition. (more…)

Newer antimicrobial therapies proposed may lead to resistance of human innate immune response.

By |February 23, 2012|Ethics, Fever Management, General Health, Health Care, Immune Function, Immune System, Medicine, Public Health, Research, Safety|

One current trend into fighting antibiotic resistant bacteria is developing a new class refered to as antimicrobial peptides (AMP’s). However a newly published study published1 a proof of concept that bacteria will develop not only resistance to these new drugs but to our own innate immune response peptides as well.

A very nice summary of the findings was published in the latest issue of The Scientist online magazine.2

1. G. J. L. Habets, Michelle, and Michael Brockhurst. “Therapeutic
antimicrobial peptides may compromise natural immunity .” Biology Letters. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Feb. 2012. <http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/early/2012/01/20/rsbl.2011.1203

2. Richards, Sabrina. “Antimicrobial Cross-Resistance Risk | The Scientist.” The Scientist. N.p., 24 Jan. 2012. Web. 23 Feb. 2012. <http://the-scientist.com/2012/01/24/antimicrobial-cross-resistance-risk/

Complementary and Alternative Medical Therapies for Children With Attention-deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

By |February 21, 2012|ADHD, Attention Deficit, Chiropractic Care, Food Sensitivity, Supplementation|

Complementary and Alternative Medical Therapies for Children With Attention-deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Altern Med Rev. 2011 (Dec); 16 (4): 323–37

Janice Pellow, M.Tech (Hom),
Elizabeth M. Solomon, HD, ND, DO, BA,
Candice N. Barnard, M.Tech (Hom), B.Phys.Ed

University of Johannesburg, Department of Homeopathy,
Johannesburg, South Africa.


Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a commonly diagnosed childhood disorder characterized by impulsivity, inattention, and hyperactivity. ADHD affects up to 1 in 20 children in the United States. The underlying etiologies of ADHD may be heterogeneous and diverse, and many possible risk factors in the development of ADHD have been identified. Conventional treatment usually consists of behavioral accommodations and medication, with stimulant medication most commonly being prescribed. Parents concerned about the side effects and long-term use of conventional medications are increasingly seeking alternatives to pharmacologic treatment. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) offers parents various treatment options for this condition, including dietary modifications, nutritional supplementation, herbal medicine, and homeopathy. CAM appears to be most effective when prescribed holistically and according to each individual’s characteristic symptoms. Possible etiologies and risk factors for the condition also need to be considered when developing a treatment plan. This article serves to highlight the latest research regarding the most commonly used CAM for children with ADHD.


Table 1.   Risk Factors for ADHD (more…)

The Death of the CCE Cartel

By |February 20, 2012|Expanded Practice, Legal Action, News|

The Death of the CCE Cartel

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic ~ February 12, 2012

By James Edwards, DC


After several organizations [1] testified in favor of the Council on Chiropractic Education (CCE) being renewed as the accrediting agency for chiropractic colleges, some of those organizations issued less-than-accurate communications implying that the CCE was victorious in its effort. The fact is that nothing could be further from the truth.

It is not my intention to identify the organizations that misinterpreted and/or misrepresented what occurred. For those organizations that attempted to “spin” the facts in order to place the CCE in the most favorable light, I will leave it to them to correct the record. Instead, I will rely solely on transcripts and the reporting of the objective and highly prestigious Chronicle of Higher Education, and let you make your own judgments. After your review, I think it will become obvious that in a word, the CCE got publicly “spanked” for blatantly and steadfastly ignoring the wishes of the majority of the chiropractic profession.

While using the word cartel might seem harsh, it is important to stress that the description of the CCE as being a “virtual cartel” did not originate from me or even from within the chiropractic profession itself. It actually arose during a previous hearing by a member of the United States Department of Education (DOE) National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity (NACIQI). For your reading pleasure, the committee member’s harsh comments are below [with emphasis added]:

“Madam Chair, we’ve heard charges and countercharges from I trust a wide, fairly wide spectrum of the chiropractic profession. At least that’s the way it seems to me. Battles over turf, battles over philosophy, maybe battles over personal ambition, but divisions of every kind.

And some of this, maybe most of it, is a consequence of, at least as I see it, a monopoly control of a profession which has led to the establishment of a virtual cartel, not unusual. There are several other professions that we deal with that have a virtual cartel control of the profession. We can’t change that, but we can consider measures that will try to send a message to the prevailing control group that they should try to be more inclusive rather than less inclusive and I suggest that we try to figure out what is within our range of alternatives to do that.

Because I believe if we simply hear it, discuss it, anguish over it, and then give them five years of recognition, that we haven’t been the impetus for any corrective action for the profession and I worry about the profession.” [2]

Harsh Words

And now to the objective reporting of the highly prestigious Chronicle of Higher Education. Sit down, fasten your seatbelts and read what this impeccable, trusted source reported [again with emphasis added]: (more…)