Chiro.org - Chiropractic Resource Organization.     Support Chiropractic Research!

Monthly Archives: March 2012

Home/2012/March

Radiologic Manifestations of Spinal Subluxations

By |March 30, 2012|Chiropractic Care, Radiology, Subluxation|

Radiologic Manifestations of Spinal Subluxations

The Chiro.Org Blog


We would all like to thank Dr. Richard C. Schafer, DC, PhD, FICC for his lifetime commitment to the profession. In the future we will continue to add materials from RC’s copyrighted books for your use.

This is Chapter 6 from RC’s best-selling book:
“Basic Chiropractic Procedural Manual”

These materials are provided as a service to our profession. There is no charge for individuals to copy and file these materials. However, they cannot be sold or used in any group or commercial venture without written permission from ACAPress.


Chapter 6: Radiologic Manifestations of Spinal Subluxations

This chapter describes the radiologic signs that may be expected when spinal subluxations are demonstrable by radiography. Through the years, there have been several concepts within the chiropractic profession about what actually constitutes a subluxation. Each has had its rationale (anatomical, neurologic, or kinematic), and each has had certain validity contributing to our understanding of this complex phenomenon.

You may review the full Chapter 6 @:

Radiologic Manifestations of Spinal Subluxations

        


Kinetic Intersegmental Subluxations


Segmental hypomobility, also called a “fixation subluxation” by many clinicians, may affect one or several motor units.

It is characterized by reduced motion of the “Spinal Motion Unit” (Please refer to Spinal Anatomy 101), which has been forced to the extreme of a range of motion (eg, flexion, extension, etc). See Figure 6.14. Stress views or videofluoroscopy are necessary to depict this and other kinetic subluxations radiographically, but motion palpation and some orthopedic tests may reveal their presence clinically.

Editor’s Note:   In the following picture, the inferior facet of C5 fails to slide forwards and upwards upon the superior facet of C6. Because of that, the IVF cannot open more fully, and the spinous process of C5 fails to move away from the C6 spinous. All together, these are the classic signs of HYPO-mobility.


(more…)

Regular Vitamin and Mineral Supplementation Lowers Colon Cancer Risk More Than Eighty Percent

By |March 28, 2012|Cancer, Prevention, Supplementation|

Regular Vitamin and Mineral Supplementation Lowers Colon Cancer Risk More Than Eighty Percent

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Natural News


Researchers, just publishing in the Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology (CJPP), have found that a diet enhanced with vitamin and mineral supplementation can lower the risk of developing precancerous colon cancer lesions by up to 84%. Colon cancer is the second most common form of the disease affecting men and women in the US, with nearly 150,000 new diagnoses each year.

The Full Text article describes how animals that were fed a high-fat, low fiber diet, while also being exposed to a carcinogen, developed pre-cancerous lesions of the colon along a pathway similar to that found in humans.

The group of animals that underwent a similar treatment and diet, but were also provided a daily vitamin and mineral supplement, demonstrated an 84% reduction in the formation of pre-cancerous lesions which did not develop into tumors.

(more…)

Steps Set for Livestock Antibiotic Ban

By |March 24, 2012|Public Health|

Source NY Times

The Obama administration must warn drug makers that the government may soon ban agricultural uses of some popular antibiotics that many scientists say encourage the proliferation of dangerous infections and imperil public health, a federal magistrate judge ruled on Thursday.

The order, issued by Judge Theodore H. Katz of the Southern District of New York, effectively restarts a process that the Food and Drug Administration began 35 years ago, but never completed, intended to prevent penicillin and tetracycline, widely used antibiotics, from losing their effectiveness in humans because of their bulk use in animal feed to promote growth in chickens, pigs and cattle.

The order comes two months after the Obama administration announced restrictions on agricultural uses of cephalosporins, a critical class of antibiotics that includes drugs like Cefzil and Keflex, which are commonly used to treat pneumonia, strep throat and skin and urinary tract infections.

Siobhan DeLancey, an F.D.A. spokeswoman, would not say whether the government planned to appeal. “We are studying the opinion and considering appropriate next steps,” she said.

In a separate move, the F.D.A. is expected to issue draft rules within days that ask drug makers to voluntarily end the use of antibiotics in animals without the oversight of a veterinarian. (more…)

The Chiropractic Care of Patients with Asthma: A Systematic Review of the Literature to Inform Clinical Practice

By |March 19, 2012|Asthma, Chiropractic Care, Placebo, Spinal Manipulation|

The Chiropractic Care of Patients with Asthma: A Systematic Review of the Literature to Inform Clinical Practice

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Clinical Chiropractic 2012 (Mar); 15 (1): 23–30

Joel Alcantara, Joey D. Alcantara, Junjoe Alcantara

International Chiropractic Pediatric Association,
Media, 327 N Middletown Rd,
Media, PA 19063, USA


Introduction   Estimates place some 300 million people worldwide suffer from asthma with 180,000 deaths attributed to the disease. The financial burden from Asthma in Western countries ranges from $300 to $1,300 per patient per year. In the United States, asthma medication costs between $1 billion and $6.2 billion per annum. With an increasing prevalence of 50% every decade, there is no question that the burden of asthma is tremendous. The prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use amongst adult asthmatics ranges from 4% to 79% whilst, in children, it ranges from 33% to 89%. Of the various practitioner-based CAM therapies, chiropractic stands as the most popular for both children and adults. As with other chiropractors, the authors aspire to the principles of evidence-based practice in the care of asthma sufferers. Recent systematic reviews of the literature places into question the effectiveness of chiropractic. To assuage the discord between our clinical experience and those of our patients with the dissonant literature, we performed a systematic review of the literature on the chiropractic care of patients with asthma.

Methods   Our systematic review utilized the following databases for the years indicated: MANTIS [1965–2010]; Pubmed [1966–2010]; ICL [1984–2010]; EMBASE [1974–2010], AMED [1967–2010], CINAHL [1964–2010], Index to Chiropractic Literature [1984–2010], Alt-Health Watch [1965–2010] and PsychINFO [1965–2010]. Inclusion criteria for manuscript review were manuscripts of primary investigation/report published in peer-reviewed journals in the English language involving the care of asthmatic patients.

Results   The studies found span of research designs from non-experimental to true experimental studies consisting of 3 randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs), 10 case reports, 3 case series, 7 cohort studies, 3 survey studies, 5 commentaries8 and 6 systematic reviews. The lower level design studies provide some measure of evidence on the effectiveness of chiropractic care for patients with asthma while a critical appraisal of 3 RCTs revealed questionable validity of the sham SMTs involved and hence the conclusions and interpretations derived from them. The RCTs on chiropractic and asthma are arguably comparison trials rather than controlled clinical trials per se.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Asthma and Chiropractic Page

(more…)

Clinical Decision-making to Facilitate Appropriate Patient Management in Chiropractic Practice: ‘The 3-questions Model’

By |March 15, 2012|Chiropractic Care, Clinical Decision-making, Diagnosis, Education|

Clinical Decision-making to Facilitate Appropriate Patient Management in Chiropractic Practice: ‘The 3-questions Model’

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2012 (Mar 14); 20: 6

Lyndon G Amorin-Woods and Gregory F Parkin-Smith

Murdoch University, School of Chiropractic and Sports Science, South Street, Murdoch, 6150 Perth, Western Australia. L.Woods@murdoch.edu.au


Background:   A definitive diagnosis in chiropractic clinical practice is frequently elusive, yet decisions around management are still necessary. Often, a clinical impression is made after the exclusion of serious illness or injury, and care provided within the context of diagnostic uncertainty. Rather than focussing on labelling the condition, the clinician may choose to develop a defendable management plan since the response to treatment often clarifies the diagnosis.

Discussion:   This paper explores the concept and elements of defensive problem-solving practice, with a view to developing a model of agile, pragmatic decision-making amenable to real-world application. A theoretical framework that reflects the elements of this approach will be offered in order to validate the potential of a so called ‘3-Questions Model’;

Summary:   Clinical decision-making is considered to be a key characteristic of any modern healthcare practitioner. It is, thus, prudent for chiropractors to re-visit the concept of defensible practice with a view to facilitate capable clinical decision-making and competent patient examination skills. In turn, the perception of competence and trustworthiness of chiropractors within the wider healthcare community helps integration of chiropractic services into broader healthcare settings.


From the FULL TEXT Article:

Development of the 3-questions Model

The chiropractic profession, particularly in Western countries, finds itself in a rapidly evolving healthcare landscape, with ‘modernisation’ being a consequence of escalating costs, an aging population, and an ever-diminishing relative resource base [9]. With a view to rationalising resources health system decision-makers are increasingly vigilant about the delivery of safe, evidence-based, cost-effective care, summarised as “the right care at the right time in the right place” [10, 11]. With this imperative in mind, the authors propose three straightforward questions that frame clinical decision-making within the context of diagnostic uncertainty.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Low Back Pain Page and the

A Clinical Model for the Diagnosis and Management Page

(more…)

Wilk v. AMA 25 Years Later: Why It Still Isn’t Over

By |March 13, 2012|News|

Wilk v. AMA 25 Years Later:
Why It Still Isn’t Over

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   ACA News ~ March 2012

By Lori A. Burkhart


The future of the chiropractic profession changed on Aug. 27, 1987, when federal court judge Susan Getzendanner found the American Medical Association (AMA) guilty of conspiring to destroy chiropractic. [1]

Early History

The nefarious plot was hatched in 1962 when the Iowa Plan was adopted by the Iowa Medical Society with the goal of eradicating chiropractic in that state. The Iowa Plan is summed up in the plaintiffs’ 132-page aid to the court, submitted June 25, 1987, in the Wilk case.

The Iowa Plan’s section “What Medicine Should Do About The Chiropractic Menace” includes a Part G titled “Undertake a positive program of ‘containment’” in which an often quoted phrase in chiropractic literature can be found: “If this program is successfully pursued, it is entirely likely that chiropractic as a profession will ‘wither on the vine’ and the chiropractic menace will die a natural but somewhat undramatic death. This policy of ‘containment’ might well be pursued along the following lines:

  • Encourage ethical complaints against doctors of chiropractic;
  • Oppose chiropractic inroads in health insurance;
  • Oppose chiropractic inroads in workmen’s compensation;
  • Oppose chiropractic inroads into labor unions;
  • Oppose chiropractic inroads into hospitals; and
  • Contain chiropractic schools.

The Iowa Plan states that such actions taken by the medical profession should be persistent and behind-the-scenes whenever possible. The medical community should never give professional recognition to doctors of chiropractic (DCs), and thus a successful program of containment will result in the decline of chiropractic.

In Wilk v. AMA, Judge Getzendanner explains that the AMA hired as its general counsel Robert B. Throckmorton, the author of the Iowa Plan, and that “as early as September 1963, the AMA’s objective was the complete elimination of the chiropractic profession.” Two months later, the AMA formed the Committee on Quackery under its Department of Investigation (DOI), and by 1964 its goal was to do away with chiropractic throughout the United States.

You may also want to review the original:

Wilk, et al vs. the AMA, et al case

(more…)