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For CAs: The Language of the Health-Care Professions

By |March 31, 2013|Chiropractic Care, Chiropractic Education, Education, Evidence-based Medicine|

For CAs: The Language of the Health-Care Professions

The Chiro.Org Blog


We would all like to thank Dr. Richard C. Schafer, DC, PhD, FICC for his lifetime commitment to the profession. In the future we will continue to add materials from RC’s copyrighted books for your use.

This is Chapter 4 from RC’s best-selling book:
“The Chiropractic Assistant”

These materials are provided as a service to our profession. There is no charge for individuals to copy and file these materials. However, they cannot be sold or used in any group or commercial venture without written permission from ACAPress.


Chapter 4: The Language of the Health-Care Professions

When more than one person is involved in any task, good communication is basic for success. Thus, a sound foundation in chiropractic terminology is an important functional skill to be possessed by any chiropractic assistant. It is a requisite to becoming an important asset to the office.

If a CA’s duties include taking dictation of case histories, examination findings, or narrative reports, she must know how to record scientific terms in shorthand and know how to spell them accurately. A good medical dictionary will be an important reference. Even if dictation is not required, she still must know what the doctor means when certain terms are used. He will expect his assistants to have a fundamental grasp of commonly used medical terms, abbreviations, and acronyms.

Do not enter this study lightly. On the other hand, do not let yourself be appalled by the formidable and specialized vocabulary used in health care. The learning of professional terms will not come overnight. It will extend the entire length of your career as new and unfamiliar words are confronted.


THE UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE OF HEALTH CARE:   WHY IT IS NECESSARY


It would not be unusual if you found many words used in the first three chapters of this program strange or at least unknown. When you undertake the transposition from lay person to chiropractic assistant, you are faced with an entirely new language that must be mastered so the transition be successful. The most efficient method to accomplish this is by securing an understanding of basic word roots, prefixes, and suffixes used in the formation of technical words and gaining an understanding of the meaning of commonly used abbreviations and acronyms. Study and repetitive use is the way to mastery.

A fundamental knowledge of anatomy (structure) and physiology (function) will be of great assistance in learning terminology. A basic understanding of human anatomy and physiology is offered in the following chapter. This chapter will prepare you for the terminology of those and other clinical subjects. While professional terms may at first seem strange, you will see their purpose in this and following chapters.

PHONETICS: THE QUICK WAY TO GRASP MEANINGS (more…)

The Quality of Reports on Cervical Arterial Dissection Following Cervical Spinal Manipulation

By |March 27, 2013|Evidence-based Medicine, Spinal Manipulation, Stroke|

The Quality of Reports on Cervical Arterial Dissection Following Cervical Spinal Manipulation

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   PLoS ONE 2013 (Mar 20); 8 (3): e59170

Shari Wynd, Michael Westaway, Sunita Vohra, Greg Kawchuk

Texas Chiropractic College,
Pasadena, Texas, United States of America.



Background   Cervical artery dissection (CAD) and stroke are serious harms that are sometimes associated with cervical spinal manipulation therapy (cSMT). Because of the relative rarity of these adverse events, studying them prospectively is challenging. As a result, systematic review of reports describing these events offers an important opportunity to better understand the relation between adverse events and cSMT. Of note, the quality of the case report literature in this area has not yet been assessed.

Purpose   1) To systematically collect and synthesize available reports of CAD that have been associated with cSMT in the literature and
2) assess the quality of these reports.

Methods   A systematic review of the literature was conducted using several databases. All clinical study designs involving CADs associated with cSMT were eligible for inclusion. Included studies were screened by two independent reviewers for the presence/absence of 11 factors considered to be important in understanding the relation between CAD and cSMT.

Results   Overall, 43 articles reported 901 cases of CAD and 707 incidents of stroke reported to be associated with cSMT. The most common type of stroke reported was ischemic stroke (92%). Time-to-onset of symptoms was reported most frequently (95%). No single case included all 11 factors.

Conclusions   This study has demonstrated that the literature infrequently reports useful data toward understanding the association between cSMT, CADs and stroke. Improving the quality, completeness, and consistency of reporting adverse events may improve our understanding of this important relation.

Copyright: © 2013 Wynd et al.   This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Funding:   Greg Kawchuk receives salary support from the Canada Research Chairs program. Sunita Vohra receives salary support from Alberta Innovates-Health Solutions. Training support for Shari Wynd was provided by the Alberta Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Training Program in Bone and Joint Health. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing interests:   The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.


From the Full-Text Article:

Introduction

In the area of harms reporting, one topic that has received significant attention is cervical spinal manipulation therapy (cSMT), an intervention most often administered by chiropractors [1, 2] to treat musculoskeletal complaints of the head and neck [3] including headaches [4]. If harms are associated with cSMT, they most commonly involve additional head and neck pain [2]. While these adverse events tend to be self-limiting [2], more serious adverse events have been reported such as neurovascular sequelae and stroke. More specifically, injuries such as cervical artery dissection (CAD), whether vertebral, internal carotid, or vertebrobasilar, have been reported to be associated with cSMT [5-7]. Although this subset of adverse events appears to occur infrequently [1, 8, 9], understanding the relation between CADs, stroke and cSMT is important given the medical [7], societal [1], economic [9], and legal [8] implications of any event leading to cerebrovascular compromise.


Read the rest of this Full Text article now!


Algorithms for the Chiropractic Management of Acute and Chronic Spine-Related Pain

By |March 26, 2013|Algorithm, Chiropractic Care, Chronic Pain, Evidence-based Medicine, Spinal Manipulation|

Algorithms for the Chiropractic Management of
Acute and Chronic Spine-Related Pain

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Top Integrative Health Care 2012 (Dec 31); 3 (4)

Gregory A. Baker, DC, Ronald J. Farabaugh, DC,
Thomas J. Augat, DC, MS, CCSP, FASA,
Cheryl Hawk, DC, PhD, CHES



The complexity of clinical documentation and case management for health care providers has increased along with the rise of managed care. Keeping up with the policies of different insurers and third party administrators can be a daunting task. To address these issues for doctors of chiropractic (DCs) and policymakers, the Council for Chiropractic Guidelines and Practice Parameters (CCGPP) developed three consensus documents. Each of these documents was the outcome of a formal consensus process in which a multidisciplinary Delphi panel consisting of experts in chiropractic and low back pain treatment came to agreement on terminology and treatment parameters for the chiropractic management of spine-related musculoskeletal pain. [1-3]


Introduction:

The complexity of clinical documentation and case management for health care providers has increased along with the rise of managed care. Keeping up with the policies of different insurers and third party administrators can be a daunting task. To address these issues for doctors of chiropractic (DCs) and policymakers, the Council for Chiropractic Guidelines and Practice Parameters (CCGPP) developed three consensus documents. Each of these documents was the outcome of a formal consensus process in which a multidisciplinary Delphi panel consisting of experts in chiropractic and low back pain treatment came to agreement on terminology and treatment parameters for the chiropractic management of spine-related musculoskeletal pain. [1-3] Their recommendations were based on a combination of consideration of the current evidence and their clinical judgment. In addition, another consensus document related to care rendered by doctors of chiropractic for the purpose of health promotion, disease prevention, and wellness, developed through a project funded by the NCMIC Foundation, was also referenced to clarify terminology used in the algorithms. [4] (See Table 1.)

There are more articles like this @ the:

Clinical Model for the Diagnosis and Management Page and the:

Chronic Neck Pain and Chiropractic Page and the:

Low Back Pain and Chiropractic Page

Table 1.
Definition of terms related to acute and chronic care

The terms “supportive care” and “maintenance care,” which are frequently used within the chiropractic health care arena, are not consistent with general healthcare industry lexicon. Instead of “supportive care,” we use the more descriptive term, “ongoing/recurrent” care.

Chronic pain management can be divided into three categories:

  1. those who can home manage;
  2. those who can be managed with episodic care; and
  3. those who need “scheduled” ongoing care, which is a very small proportion of chronic pain sufferers. Those patients require proper documentation of responses to care and procedures, including therapeutic withdrawal response, multi-modal, multi-disciplinary consideration, patient education, etc.


(more…)

Chiropractic: What does the future hold?

By |March 22, 2013|Philosophy|

The Institute for Alternative Futures (IAF) is a leader in the creation of preferred futures. Since its founding in 1977 by Clement Bezold, Alvin Toffler and James Dator, IAF has helped organizations monitor trends, explore future possibilities and create the futures they prefer. IAF draws on a robust selection of futures methodologies, such as environmental scans, forecasts, scenarios, visioning and its own “aspirational futures” technique.

Recently the institute released Chiropractic 2025: Divergent Futures (pdf) which was made possible by funding from the NCMIC Foundation.

Therein, 4 scenarios are presented:

Scenario 1: Marginal Gains, Marginalized Field

As health care reorganizes, the historical isolation of chiropractors hinders most DCs in joining integrated care provider organizations. The majority remains in solo and small group practices and face major challenges in building or maintaining an adequate patient base. Research to develop and demonstrate evidence-informed practice grows. This gets DCs more favorable attention, yet networks often use the data to limit fees and the number of visits. Five states assign broader practice rights to DCs. Focused-scope oriented colleges join leading academic medical centers in exploring quantum biology to explain healing and subluxation. However, four chiropractic colleges close. Low starting income for chiropractors in many settings, and limited career prospects for most DCs coupled with high student debt, hamper the growth of the profession over the decade leading to 2025.

Scenario 2: Hard Times & Civil War
(more…)

Successful Management of Acute-onset Torticollis in a Giraffe

By |March 20, 2013|Animal Chiropractic, Cervical Spine, Torticollis|

Successful Management of Acute-onset Torticollis in a Giraffe

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 2013 (Mar); 44 (1): 181-5

Liza I. Dadone, V.M.D., Kevin K. Haussler, D.V.M., D.C., Ph.D., Dipl. A.C.V.S.M.R., Greg Brown, D.V.M., Melanie Marsden, D.V.M., James Gaynor, D.V.M., Dipl. A.C.V.A., Dipl. A.A.P.M, Matthew S. Johnston, V.M.D., Dipl. A.B.V.P. (Avian), DellaGarelle, D.V.M.

Cheyenne Mountain Zoo,
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80906, USA


A 2-yr-old male reticulated giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis reticulata) presented with severe midcervical segmental torticollis upon arrival as an incoming shipment. Despite initial medical management, the giraffe developed marked neck sensitivity, focal muscle spasms, and decreased cervical range of motion. Using operant conditioning to assist patient positioning and tolerance to cervical manipulation, a series of manually applied chiropractic treatments were applied to the affected cervical vertebrae in an effort to restore normal cervical mobility.

(more…)