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Monthly Archives: July 2013

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Can Alzheimer’s Disease Be Prevented?

By |July 27, 2013|Alzheimer's Disease, Prevention|

Can Alzheimer’s Disease Be Prevented?

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Medscape Medical News ~ June 24, 2013

Bret S. Stetka, MD

Reporting from The American Psychiatric Association’s 2013 Annual Meeting


Introduction

“Do we have any control over our brain health as we age?”, Dr. Gary Small asked the crowd, a packed room of psychiatrists attending his “Brain Health and Alzheimer’s Prevention” talk at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) in San Francisco, California. [1]Nearly everyone raised their hands. “If the answer is yes,” he followed, “then what can we do to forestall the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD)?” For the next hour, conference-goers found out or, perhaps, given their line of work, brushed up.

Dr. Small is Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the UCLA Longevity Center at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior. As session chair Dr. Brent Forester pointed out in his introduction, Small’s list of achievements is humbling: renowned clinician, cutting-edge researcher, author of over 400 scientific publications and 7 popular books, including his latest, The Alzheimer’s Prevention Program. His research has contributed to brain imaging methods capable of detecting AD years before symptoms are present; his healthy lifestyle and memory training programs are widely used throughout the United States. In 2002, Scientific American Magazine named Small one of the world’s top innovators in science and technology.

Up went an image of Madame Jeanne Calment, a French supercentenarian who lived to 122 years. “At 94, Calment sold her apartment to a businessman who agreed to pay her rent for the rest of her life. He died 10 years later,” said Small to the chuckling crowd. He was introducing the idea that certain lifestyles are associated with both longevity and brain health, a term encompassing our various neurologic faculties like memory, thinking, reasoning, mood, and stress responses. There are certain regions in the world — so-called “blue zones” — with abnormally high clusters of centenarians, most notably Sardinia, Italy; Loma Linda, California; and Okinawa, Japan. These regions share a number of characteristics thought to contribute to collective longevity and prolonged brain health on which Small would later expand: Namely, their inhabitants tend to be physically active, socially engaged, and eat a healthy diet high in omega-3 fats, just like the fish-heavy fare most likely enjoyed by Ms. Calment in the south of France.

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The Consequences of Zinc Deficiency

By |July 21, 2013|Nutrient Deficiency, Nutrition|

The Consequences of Zinc Deficiency

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic

By James P. Meschino, DC, MS


A study published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry [1] underscores the importance of zinc supplementation, especially as we get older, as an important means to help prevent cancer, support immune function, and control inflammation associated with many health problems, including cancer, heart disease, autoimmune disease and diabetes.

Previous studies by the same researchers showed that, in both animal and human studies, zinc deficiency can cause DNA damage linked to cancer risk. The latest study suggests that zinc deficiency also leads to systemic inflammation. In addition, immune system cells are also particularly vulnerable to zinc deficiencies, and zinc is essential to protect against oxidative stress and help repair DNA damage.

The Latest Findings

Based on findings with laboratory animals, the researchers found that the mechanisms to transport zinc are disrupted by age-related epigenetic changes, which can cause an increase in DNA methylation and histone modifications related to cancer development. More specifically, zinc transporters were significantly dysregulated in old animals. They showed signs of zinc deficiency and had an enhanced inflammatory response, even though their diet supposedly contained adequate amounts of zinc.

When the animals were given about 10 times their dietary requirement for zinc, the biomarkers of inflammation were restored to those of young animals.

Why You Should Supplement With Zinc

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Bulletproof Your Documentation

By |July 13, 2013|Chiropractic Care, Documentation|

Bulletproof Your Documentation

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic Economics

By Kathy Mills Chang


Part 1: Ensure your admitting and ongoing paperwork isn’t slipping through the cracks

Because of the many different techniques and philosophies involved in chiropractic, you can be assured different doctors utilize different admitting and ongoing paperwork.

A recent survey of 80 chiropractors revealed that 72 percent of them collected paperwork for their clinic from various sources, creating a patchwork effect. Because very few utilized an actual system of paperwork, they admitted concern that some documentation could fall through the cracks.

So, what paperwork should you have in your office?

History

Most state chiropractic boards that have a standard of care for patients include taking patient history. If one were to follow the evaluation and management documentation guidelines, history is a significant portion of the value.

Because the requirements entail collecting information about the chief complaint; the history of the present illness; a review of systems; and the patient’s past, family, and social history, there is a substantial amount of information that can and should come from the patient.

Having information laid out in a clear fashion on your admitting paperwork allows the patient to answer the majority of the essential initial consultation questions. Using your admitting paperwork as a template allows you to ensure the required bullet points will be answered by the patient and reviewed by the physician.

There are many more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Assistant Page

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Children and Scoliosis

By |July 6, 2013|Pediatrics, Scoliosis|

Children and Scoliosis

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic

By Kim Christensen, DC, DACRB, CCSP, CSCS


Scoliosis is defined as “any lateral deviation of the spine from the mid-sagittal plane.” [1]

While there are many causes for scoliosis, children and adolescents with scoliosis who present to chiropractors usually fall into three categories.

Successful treatment is dependent upon differentiating the underlying cause of the spinal curvature. In most children, the scoliotic spine is not symptomatic; the spinal curvature is first noticed either by a parent who becomes concerned about a child’s posture, or during a screening examination, usually at school. The importance of a good evaluation and early treatment is to prevent progression and worsening of the curvature. Children with all three major causes of scoliosis should have a careful evaluation of the lower extremities as part of their spinal examination to determine associated or contributing components to the spinal deviation.

  1. Structural vs. Nonstructural Scoliosis   A structural scoliosis is defined as a spinal curvature that does not correct during recumbent, lateral flexion radiographs. The two most common causes of a structural scoliosis are congenital and idiopathic. A nonstructural scoliosis can be reduced when lying down, and will correct with recumbent lateral flexion. This type of spinal curvature is sometimes called a “functional curve,” and is often secondary to a leg length discrepancy.

  2. Congenital Scoliosis   Of the three major etiologies of scoliosis, this is the least common. Congenital scoliosis develops secondary to a bony anomaly of the sacrum, vertebrae or ribs. These are often defects of formation or segmentation, resulting in wedged, blocked, or hemi-vertebrae. In some cases, the abnormality will require corrective surgery. In many children, a heel lift or shoe buildup can provide sufficient structural support, and help to maintain a balanced spine.

    When a congenital spinal anomaly is discovered, it’s important to remember that there are usually multiple affected areas. For instance, it is more common to have multiple bony abnormalities than just a single level. Nonosseous and extraspinal deformities are also often present. These may include the cartilaginous and connective tissues, and even genitourinary or cardiovascular abnormalities. Clubfoot, a congenitally dislocated hip, or an anatomically short leg often will contribute to the spinal imbalance.

  3. Idiopathic Scoliosis   Idiopathic scoliosis can be progressive, worsening significantly during periods of rapid growth. In the more severe cases, bracing, or possibly surgery, may be necessary to prevent substantial deformity. [2] After skeletal maturity, most curvatures progress only slowly, if at all. Recent scientific research has focused on hormonal and neurological causes for idiopathic scoliosis, with some promising early results, but no definitive conclusions.

Learn more about Scoliosis @ our:

Scoliosis and Chiropractic Page

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Happy Independence Day! (2013)

By |July 3, 2013|Announcement|

“There is nothing wrong with America that cannot be cured by what is right with America.”
– William J. Clinton



Enjoy the Fireworks Over the Lady of Liberty in NYC



IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776

The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.–That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, –That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.

Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.–Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government.

The Prevalence and Progression of Neck and Back Pain in Children Over Time

By |July 3, 2013|Chiropractic Care, Neck Pain, Pediatrics|

The Prevalence and Progression of Neck and Back Pain in Children Over Time

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Musculoskelet Disord. 2011 (May 16); 12: 98

Per Kjaer, Niels Wedderkopp, Lars Korsholm,
and Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde

Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics,
Part of Clinical Locomotion Network,
University of Southern Denmark,
Campusvej 55, DK-5230, Odense, Denmark


The following article appears to be the first study to track and review the progression of back pain in the same group of children, over a prolonged period, to see how (or if) it is a contributor to those same complains in adulthood.

Of particular interest is Table 2, because it breaks down and tracks complaints of either neck, mid back, or low back pain in the same group of children at 3 different time periods: ages 9, 13 and 15 years old.

Table 2: Prevalence rates of different types of back pain in a cohort of Danish children/adolescents surveyed at three time points

  Age Group  
Age 9
Age 13
Age 15
Neck Pain
All children
Boys
Girls
10%
9%
11%
7%
5%
9%
15%
13%
18%
Mid Back Pain
All children
Boys
Girls
20%
22%
19%
13%
13%
13%
28%
22%
32%
Low Back Pain
All children
Boys
Girls
33%
32%
34%
28%
26%
30%
48%
39%
54%

The Abstract:

BACKGROUND:   It is generally acknowledged that back pain (BP) is a common condition already in childhood. However, the development until early adulthood is not well understood and, in particular, not the individual tracking pattern. The objectives of this paper are to show the prevalence estimates of BP, low back pain (LBP), mid back pain (MBP), neck pain (NP), and care-seeking because of BP at three different ages (9, 13 and 15 years) and how the BP reporting tracks over these age groups over three consecutive surveys.

METHODS:   A longitudinal cohort study was carried out from the years of 1997 till 2005, collecting interview data from children who were sampled to be representative of Danish schoolchildren. BP was defined overall and specifically in the three spinal regions as having reported pain within the past month. The prevalence estimates and the various patterns of BP reporting over time are presented as percentages.

RESULTS:   Of the 771 children sampled, 62%, 57%, and 58% participated in the three back surveys and 34% participated in all three. The prevalence estimates for children at the ages of 9, 13, and 15, respectively, were for BP 33%, 28%, and 48%; for LBP 4%, 22%, and 36%; for MBP 20%, 13%, and 35%; and for NP 10%, 7%, and 15%. Seeking care for BP increased from 6% and 8% at the two youngest ages to 34% at the oldest. Only 7% of the children who participated in all three surveys reported BP each time and 30% of these always reported no pain. The patterns of development differed for the three spinal regions and between genders. Status at the previous survey predicted status at the next survey, so that those who had pain before were more likely to report pain again and vice versa. This was most pronounced for care-seeking.

CONCLUSION:   It was confirmed that BP starts early in life, but the patterns of onset and development over time vary for different parts of the spine and between genders. Because of these differences, it is recommended to report on BP in youngsters separately for the three spinal regions, and to differentiate in the analyses between the genders and age groups. Although only a small minority reported BP at two or all three surveys, tracking of BP (particularly NP) and care seeking was noted from one survey to the other. On the positive side, individuals without BP at a previous survey were likely to remain pain free at the subsequent survey.


Background

It is well known that back pain (BP) is a common and costly problem in the general population. Previously, BP in children was considered rare and a sign of a potentially serious disorder [1,2]. Today, according to a recent systematic review, the general opinion would be that BP, including low back pain (LBP), mid back pain (MBP) and neck pain (NP), starts already early in life to accelerate during the early teens up till early adulthood [3] and that its presence in young age is a precursor for BP also in adulthood [4]. In order to approach the issues of prevention and treatment it is helpful to understand the extent and course of a disease, particularly around the time of its onset and that picture is, presently, far from clear. Methodological and definition issues can partly explain this [3]. However, this is also a question of the study objectives and design. It is therefore not surprising that the estimates from various studies vary and that often they make no sense. Also, there appears to be no credible data on the true incidence for each spinal region in young people.

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