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Treatment Preferences Amongst Physical Therapists and Chiropractors for the Management of Neck Pain: Results of an International Survey

By |March 30, 2014|Neck Pain|

Treatment Preferences Amongst Physical Therapists and Chiropractors for the Management of Neck Pain: Results of an International Survey

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2014 (Mar 24);   22 (1):   11

Lisa C Carlesso, Joy C MacDermid, Anita R Gross,
David M Walton, P Lina Santaguida

Toronto Western Research Institute,
University Health Network,
399 Bathurst Street – MP11-328,
Toronto, Ontario M5T 2S8, Canada


BACKGROUND:   Clinical practice guidelines on the management of neck pain make recommendations to help practitioners optimize patient care. By examining the practice patterns of practitioners, adherence to CPGs or lack thereof, is demonstrated. Understanding utilization of various treatments by practitioners and comparing these patterns to that of recommended guidelines is important to identify gaps for knowledge translation and improve treatment regimens.Aim: To describe the utilization of interventions in patients with neck pain by clinicians.

METHODS:   A cross-sectional international survey was conducted from February 2012 to March 2013 to determine physical medicine, complementary and alternative medicine utilization amongst 360 clinicians treating patients with neck pain.

RESULTS:   The survey was international (19 countries) with Canada having the largest response (38%). Results were analyzed by usage amongst physical therapists (38%) and chiropractors (31%) as they were the predominant respondents. Within these professions, respondents were male (41-66%) working in private practice (69-95%). Exercise and manual therapies were consistently (98-99%) used by both professions but tests of subgroup differences determined that physical therapists used exercise, orthoses and ‘other’ interventions more, while chiropractors used phototherapeutics more. However, phototherapeutics (65%), Orthoses/supportive devices (57%), mechanical traction (55%) and sonic therapies (54%) were not used by the majority of respondents. Thermal applications (73%) and acupuncture (46%) were the modalities used most commonly. Analysis of differences across the subtypes of neck pain indicated that respondents utilize treatments more often for chronic neck pain and whiplash conditions, followed by radiculopathy, acute neck pain and whiplash conditions, and facet joint dysfunction by diagnostic block. The higher rates of usage of some interventions were consistent with supporting evidence (e.g. manual therapy). However, there was moderate usage of a number of interventions that have limited support or conflicting evidence (e.g. ergonomics).

CONCLUSIONS:   This survey indicates that exercise and manual therapy are core treatments provided by chiropractors and physical therapists. Future research should address gaps in evidence associated with variable practice patterns and knowledge translation to reduce usage of some interventions that have been shown to be ineffective.


From the Full-Text Article:

Background

Clinical practice guidelines are developed to provide statements and recommendations with the intention of helping practitioners optimize patient care [1]. By examining the practice patterns of practitioners, adherence to CPGs or lack thereof, is demonstrated. Recommendations for practice can then be formed. Understanding existing practice patterns provides insight into how current evidence impacts on practice and can identify where greater efforts in knowledge translation are needed. Clinical practice will vary dependent on a number of factors such as location, resources available, patient population, and professional background. Several CPGs from varying professionals who treat patients with neck pain exist [2-5]. To our knowledge no examination of practice patterns across health care professionals who treat patients with neck pain has been published.

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Updated Reference Guide to Dr. Richard C. Schafer’s Works

By |March 23, 2014|Education|

Updated Reference Guide
to Dr. Richard C. Schafer’s Works

The Chiro.Org Blog


There are now 63 different Chapters from Dr. Schafer’s various best-selling textbooks for your review, available exclusively at Chiro.Org

These learned articles by Dr. Schafer can be found again easily by selecting the CATEGORY titled EDUCATION, on the right-hand side of this page, just below Recent Comments. We hope you will find them of interest.

Our thanks to ACAPress for access to these materials!


These materials are provided as a service to our profession. There is no charge for individuals to copy and file these materials. However, they cannot be sold or used in any group or commercial venture without written permission from ACAPress.

Applied Physiotherapy in Chiropractic
Chap 1   The Rationale of Physiotherapy in Chiropractic
Chap 3   Commonly Used Meridian Points
Chap 13   Rehabilitation Methodology
Chap 15   Chiropractic Perspectives On Myofascial Therapy
 
Basic Chiropractic Procedural Manual
(Emphasizing Geriatric Considerations)
Chap 1   Basic Principles and Practice of Chiropractic
Chap 3   Orthopedic and Neurologic Procedures in Chiropractic
Chap 6   Radiologic Manifestations of Spinal Subluxations
Chap 8   A Compendium of Clinical Geriatrics
Chap 10   Introduction to Chiropractic Physiologic Therapeutics
 
Basic Principles of Chiropractic Neuroscience
Chap 1   An Introduction to the Principles of Chiropractic
Chap 2   General Principles of Clinical Neurology
Chap 3   The Longitudinal Neurologic Systems
Chap 4   The Horizontal Neurologic Levels
Chap 5   Neuroconceptual Models of Chiropractic
Chap 6   Causes and Potential Effects of the Subluxation Complex
Chap 7   Specific Potentialities of the Subluxation Complex
Chap 8   Clinical Disorders and the Sensory System
Chap 9   Clinical Disorders and the Motor System
Chap 10   Clinical Disorders and the Autonomic Nervous System
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What Are You Really Saying?

By |March 12, 2014|Practice Management|

What Are You Really Saying?

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Today’s Chiropractic

By Rachel Sullivan


Actions may speak louder than words, but for the busy chiropractic office and the average patient, words may not be doing much at all. In an ideal world, a patient would seek out care, ask pertinent questions, provide all relevant information and leave feeling secure they had been heard, understood and, most importantly, treated well.

Unfortunately for far too many patients—and their chiropractic caregivers—the world is far from ideal. To this end, numerous experts agree miscommunication generally arises either during the course of chiropractors’ lay lectures or discussion of case histories.

“The single biggest problem, in my opinion, is that too many chiropractors talk too much,” says Bill Esteb, owner of Patient Media. “Most people think effective communication is about eloquent, suave answers, but behind that is the ability to listen. I’ve met a lot of chiropractors who aren’t good listeners, because they confuse listening with hearing. One is a physiological act; the other is a social skill.”

Mike Headlee, D.C., agrees. “In a nutshell, to do my job and spread the message of chiropractic care, the first thing I tell patients is it’s about them. I let them talk and when it’s my turn to explain what I can do, I will clarify what they said. This is about building a rapport and really making a connection. The object is to put them at ease and get the message across, but the main objective is to help each patient on the particular day I am seeing them.”

In this capacity, Headlee says he begins each session with his patients using an open-ended question like, “What can I do for you today?” Then, and most importantly in his opinion, he shuts up to listen. “I think it’s absolutely critical to know what experience my patients have had with chiropractic before me,” Headlee explains. “I’m not asking for the names of their former doctors, but I do want to know what worked and what didn’t. It’s important to hear what the patient has to say about their situation. It’s amazing to realize how many patients know something is wrong with them, but don’t know what.”

There are more materials like this @ our:

Chiropractic Assistant Page and our:

New DCs Page

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Was Jack LaLanne a chiropractor?

By |March 4, 2014|Fitness|

Source Jack LaLanne Blog

p-3I was not aware of this but famed fitness proponent Jack LaLanne was in fact a chiropractor. His curiosity about the inter-working of the muscles of the body lead him to attend Oakland C.C. in the early ’40’s. Following graduation Jack was actively operating the first modern health spa using his chiropractic education to help his students get into shape. Then W.W. II broke out and he found himself in Guadalcanal evacuating and rehabilitating the wounded. Following the war, Jack returned to operating his spa and soon found himself on the television helping millions of Americans stay in shape and all the while being proud he was a chiropractor. Due to the aforementioned circumstances in his life, he was never able to hang out a shingle, but he supported his fellow chiropractors through lectures and personal appearances. Currently Jack has a chiropractic program called ‘Stay Fit Seniors’ that combines healthy exercise with chiropractic care, which continues on with his wife Elaine, son Jon Allen, and the rest of the LaLanne family.