Chiro.org - Chiropractic Resource Organization.     Support Chiropractic Research!

Monthly Archives: December 2014

Home/2014/December

Risk of Traumatic Injury Associated with Chiropractic Spinal Manipulation in Medicare Part B Beneficiaries Aged 66-99

By |December 12, 2014|Chiropractic Care, Stroke|

Risk of Traumatic Injury Associated with Chiropractic Spinal Manipulation in Medicare Part B Beneficiaries Aged 66-99

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2014 (Dec 9) [Epub ahead of print]

James M Whedon, DC, MS; Todd A Mackenzie, PhD;
Reed B Phillips, DC, PhD; Jon D Lurie, MD, MS

The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice,
Lebanon, NH

Southern California University of Health Sciences,
Whittier, CA


Study Design.   Retrospective cohort study

Objective.   In older adults with a neuromusculoskeletal complaint, to evaluate risk of injury to the head, neck or trunk following an office visit for chiropractic spinal manipulation, as compared to office visit for evaluation by primary care physician

Summary of Background Data.   The risk of physical injury due to spinal manipulation has not been rigorously evaluated for older adults, a population particularly vulnerable to traumatic injury in general.

Methods.   We analyzed Medicare administrative data on Medicare B beneficiaries aged 66-99 with an office visit in 2007 for a neuromusculoskeletal complaint. Using a Cox proportional hazards model, we evaluated for adjusted risk of injury within 7 days, comparing two cohorts: those treated by chiropractic spinal manipulation vs. those evaluated by a primary care physician. We used direct adjusted survival curves to estimate the cumulative probability of injury. In the chiropractic cohort only, we used logistic regression to evaluate the effect of specific chronic conditions on likelihood of injury.

Results.   The adjusted risk of injury in the chiropractic cohort was lower as compared to the primary care cohort (hazard ratio 0.24; 95% CI 0.23-0.25). The cumulative probability of injury in the chiropractic cohort was 40 injury incidents per 100,000 subjects, as compared to 153 incidents per 100,000 subjects in the primary care cohort. Among subjects who saw a chiropractic physician, the likelihood of injury was increased in those with a chronic coagulation defect, inflammatory spondylopathy, osteoporosis, aortic aneurysm and dissection, or long-term use of anticoagulant therapy.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Stroke and Chiropractic Page

(more…)

The Medical Monopoly: Protecting Consumers Or Limiting Competition?

By |December 10, 2014|Editorial|

The Medical Monopoly:
Protecting Consumers Or Limiting Competition?

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   The Cato Institute Policy Analysis No. 246

by Sue A. Blevins

Writer and health policy consultant, based in Boston.


Executive Summary

Nonphysician providers of medical care are in high demand in the United States. But licensure laws and federal regulations limit their scope of practice and restrict access to their services. The result has almost inevitably been less choice and higher prices for consumers.

Safety and consumer protection issues are often cited as reasons for restricting nonphysician services. But the restrictions appear not to be based on empirical findings. Studies have repeatedly shown that qualified nonphysician providers–such as midwives, nurses, and chiropractors — can perform many health and medical services traditionally performed by physicians — with comparable health outcomes, lower costs, and high patient satisfaction.

Licensure laws appear to be designed to limit the supply of health care providers and restrict competition to physicians from nonphysician practitioners. The primary result is an increase in physician fees and income that drives up health care costs.

At a time government is trying to cut health spending and improve access to health care, it is imperative to examine critically the extent to which government policies are responsible for rising health costs and the unavailability of health services. Eliminating the roadblocks to competition among health care providers could improve access to health services, lower health costs, and reduce government spending.

Introduction

There are more articles like this @ our:

Alternative Medicine Articles Collection

Although broad-based health care reform has temporarily moved to the back of the public agenda, there remain serious problems of cost and access in the American health care system. The underlying reason for those problems is the lack of a functioning free market in health care in this country. There is privately owned health care, but there is not a living, vibrant free marketplace in health care like there is in other products and services.

Healthy markets have certain common characteristics. On the supply side, there is a choice of providers, in competition with one another, trying to gain customers on the basis of price and quality. And on the demand side, there are consumers seeking the best deal for their dollar. In today’s health care system, neither of those conditions obtains.

During the 1994 health care reform debate, much attention was given to the demand side of the market. [1] That attention led to the development of ideas such as medical savings accounts to make health care consumers more cost conscious. [2]

However, true reform requires that the supply side of the health care market be addressed as well. Currently, a wide variety of licensing laws and other regulatory restricions limits the scope of practice of nonphysician professionals and restricts access to their services. Moreover, at the same time that it is restricting the practices of nontraditional health care professionals, government is providing subsidies for the education and training of physcians who fit the medical orthodoxy. The result has been the creation of a de facto medical monopoly, leading to less choice and higher prices for consumers.

Therefore, true health care reform must involve ending the government-imposed medical monopoly and providing consumers with a full array of health care choices.


Read the rest of this article now!


The Chiropractic Profession in Norway

By |December 9, 2014|Chiropractic Management|

The Chiropractic Profession in Norway

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2014 (Dec 8)   22   44

Ole C Kvammen and Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde

Private practice,
Fokus Helse og Trening,
Aagaards pl. 5,
Sandefjord 3211, Norway


Background   The chiropractic profession in Norway has increased five-fold in the last two decades. As there is no academic graduate program in Norway, all chiropractors have been trained outside of Norway, in either Europe, America or Australia. This might have given Norwegian chiropractors heterogenic characteristics concerning practice routines and clinical settings. However, little is known about what characterizes this profession and how it compares to other chiropractic professions in Europe. The aim of this survey was to describe major characteristics of the chiropractic profession in Norway.

Method   Two surveys were distributed to all 530 registered chiropractors in Norway in 2011. One survey was for all chiropractors (Survey 1) and the other for clinic owners (Survey 2). Results have been reported as tables and as approximate percentages in the text for ease of reading.

Result   Response rates were 61% (Survey 1, N = 320) and 71% (Survey 2, N = 217). More than two-thirds of the chiropractors in Norway had been in practice for under a decade. Only one in four chiropractors worked in solo practice and the majority shared premises with at least one colleague, typically at least one physiotherapist and one additional health practitioner. Today, only one in five clinics possessed radiologic equipment and one in ten had access to diagnostic ultrasound equipment. The majority of the chiropractors reported to apply mainly similar treatment modalities. More than 90% reported to use manipulation techniques on most patients, with soft tissue techniques and exercise modalities being almost as common. More than 3/4 of the profession reported that their clinical practice was in accordance with available clinical guidelines and about one third were positive about participating in future clinical research.

(more…)

Low Vitamin D Levels and the Risk of Dementia and Alzheimer Disease

By |December 5, 2014|Nutrition|

Vitamin D and the Risk of Dementia and Alzheimer Disease

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Neurology 2014 (Sep 2);   83 (10):   920–928 ~ FULL TEXT


This new Vitamin D study, published online in Neurology, tracked 1,658 elderly men and women for 5 years. At the start of the study, none of them suffered from dementia. The researchers controlled for many dementia risk factors — including age, education, sex, body mass index, smoking, alcohol use, diabetes and hypertension. They found that those individuals with vitamin D levels BELOW 50 (nanomoles per liter) experienced a 53 percent increased risk for all-cause dementia, and a 69 percent increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease. People with readings of 25 or less were more than twice as likely to have Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia.

As Christmas Approaches

By |December 3, 2014|Announcement|

As Christmas Approaches

The Chiro.Org Blog


If you shop at Amazon, you can help support chiropractic research this year!

We are an Amazon Associate, which simply means that they give us a 2-4% commission on every purchase made through our personalized Order tool.

Because we tithe more than 50% of our yearly income to support chiropractic research, you can help support it too, by making your major purchases right here.

Thanks to ALL of you, from all of us here at Chiro.Org.

Happy Holidays!


If you use this box to shop,
we receive a small commission.
Support Chiro.Org when you shop!