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Daily Archives: January 8, 2015

A Culture of Collaboration at an Integrative Health Center

By |January 8, 2015|Integrative Care|

A Culture of Collaboration
at an Integrative Health Center –
An Interview with David Fogel, MD –
Interviewed by Daniel Redwood, DC

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Topics in Integrative Health Care 2014, Vol. 5(3)

Daniel Redwood, DC



David Fogel, MD, is the cofounder (with his wife, Ilana Bar-Levav, MD), of the Casey Health Institute (CHI) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, a nonprofit integrative primary care practice that includes Internal Medicine, Family Practice, Chiropractic, Acupuncture, Massage Therapy, Yoga Therapy, Naturopathic Medicine and more. He is board certified in Internal Medicine with additional specialty training in mind/body focused individual and group psychotherapy.

As an internist, he served in the National Health Service Corps and on the staff at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, providing primary care to medically underserved inner city Baltimore residents. He has held positions as Medical Director of Employee Health at NASA Headquarters and as Medical Director of Integrative Medicine Associates in Washington, DC. Dr. Fogel holds a B.A. from Hampshire College and is a graduate of the George Washington University School of Medicine. He completed his residency at Washington Hospital Center.

In this interview, Dr. Fogel describes his journey from conventional to integrative medicine, the unique circumstances surrounding CHI’s founding, the collaborative relationships that comprise its core, and the ways he hopes it can serve as a model for new methods of healthcare delivery that are both effective and cost-effective.


Tell us how you first branched out from the conventional approaches you were taught in medical school.

I was first exposed to the concept of chi as a teenager. It’s kind of the classic story — I was beaten up, and as a result I got into the martial arts. There, I learned this incredible concept, that there was energy running through your body. That you can channel it, that it can be used for healing. So that opened me up at a young age to exploring other things. Then, I went to a kind of hippie college, Hampshire College, which opened me up to non-conventional alternatives of all kinds. This included mind-body approaches. I concentrated in humanistic psychology.

I went on to medical school. This was the era when Nixon went to China, and suddenly there were acupuncturists in the DC area. I said to myself, I need to go to an acupuncturist just to experience what it is. The Traditional Acupuncture Institute in Columbia, Maryland was just opening up (now Maryland University of Integrative Health). I kept reading and exploring these sorts of things throughout medical school. Then, in the 1990s, when David Eisenberg published his landmark article in the New England Journal of Medicine, about how many people were using complementary and alternative approaches, that gave a lot of people permission to start experimenting with different models, in a more mainstream or public way.

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An interview with Dr Greg Stewart, president of the WFC

By |January 8, 2015|Public Health|

Greg Stewart

Dr Greg Stewart

Source Canadian Chiropractor

Mari-Len De Guzman of Canadian Chiropractor magazine talked with the president of the World Federation of Chiropractic Dr Greg Stewart about global opportunities, collaboration and the chiropractic values.

What Dr Stewart is most excited about is the opportunity to help advance the chiropractic profession as an equal player in the global health care arena, helping solve some of the world’s most pressing health issues.

“The opportunities have never been better. It’s a matter of whether we have the courage to walk through the doors that are open”, says Stewart. The World Health Organization has acknowledged the need for leadership in the area of spinal disorders, which are now a greater contributor to the burden of disease than HIV/AIDS, malaria, stroke, lung and breast cancer, and diabetes.

Says Stewart, “We have the ability to change the way the world is dealing with their health care. It’s cost-effective, it’s drugless, it has unlimited possibilities to help improve the health of the world and decrease the burden of disability world-wide.”

There are many reasons to be encouraged. “We have situations like in Denmark and Switzerland, where the curriculum for chiropractic and medicine is the same for the first three years, with chiropractic and medical students in the same classes until they branch off to their different streams in later years, “ Stewart notes. This early exposure to one another is enabling a new generation of health care practitioners that is much more inclined to collaboration.

“We have to leave our little comfortable areas and actually go into areas that are challenging, and sometimes confrontational, in order to get ahead,” he says.

Stewart acknowledges there are still ongoing issues that may have to be ironed out within the profession, but cautions against letting these internal disagreements get in the way of progress for the profession.

Stewart is confident the profession can effect big changes in health care, nationally and globally. “It’s my personal goal to really move away from chiropractic just trying to survive, into a world where we flourish.”

Read the full interview at Canadian Chiropractor.