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Monthly Archives: August 2015

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First-Contact Care With a Medical vs Chiropractic Provider

By |August 23, 2015|Musculoskeletal Complaints, Patient Satisfaction|

First-Contact Care With a Medical vs Chiropractic Provider After Consultation With a Swiss Telemedicine Provider: Comparison of Outcomes, Patient Satisfaction, and Health Care Costs in Spinal, Hip, and Shoulder Pain Patients

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2015 (Aug 15)]

Taco A.W. Houweling, DC, MRes, PhD,
Andrea V. Braga, MD, MBA,
Thomas Hausheer, DC, arco Vogelsang, DC,
Cynthia Peterson, RN, DC, MMedEd,
B. Kim Humphreys, DC, PhD

Department of Chiropractic Medicine,
University Hospital Balgrist, Forchstrasse 340, 8008
Zürich, Switzerland.


OBJECTIVE:   The purpose of this study was to identify differences in outcomes, patient satisfaction, and related health care costs in spinal, hip, and shoulder pain patients who initiated care with medical doctors (MDs) vs those who initiated care with doctors of chiropractic (DCs) in Switzerland.

METHODS:   A retrospective double cohort design was used. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by first-contact care spinal, hip, and shoulder pain patients who, 4 months previously, contacted a Swiss telemedicine provider regarding advice about their complaint. Related health care costs were determined in a subsample of patients by reviewing the claims database of a Swiss insurance provider.

RESULTS:   The study sample included 403 patients who had seen MDs and 316 patients who had seen DCs as initial health care providers for their complaint. Differences in patient sociodemographic characteristics were found in terms of age, pain location, and mode of onset. Patients initially consulting MDs had significantly less reduction in their numerical pain rating score (difference of 0.32) and were significantly less likely to be satisfied with the care received (odds ratio = 1.79) and the outcome of care (odds ratio = 1.52). No significant differences were found for Patient’s Global Impression of Change ratings. Mean costs per patient over 4 months were significantly lower in patients initially consulting DCs (difference of CHF 368; US $368).

There are more articles like this @ our:

Low Back Pain and Chiropractic Page

and our:

The Shoulder Girdle & Chiropractic Page

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Chiropractic Physicians Call for Conservative Treatments for Pain Management Amid Prescription Painkiller Epidemic

By |August 20, 2015|News|

Source American Chiropractic Association

American Chiropractic Association launches 2015 public awareness campaign aimed at curbing opioid overuse and abuse

During National Chiropractic Health Month (NCHM) in October, the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) will work with thousands of doctors of chiropractic (DCs), chiropractic assistants (CAs) and chiropractic doctoral students nationwide to bring attention to the public health crisis caused by pain, and in particular the overuse of prescription painkillers, with this year’s theme #PainFreeNation. The campaign is part of the profession’s ongoing efforts to educate the public about the value of exhaustingconservative forms of care for both acute and chronic pain before resorting to higher risk options, such as opioids.

“Opioid medications involve the risk of overuse and addiction. Beyond the risks of overuse and addiction, prescription drugs that numb pain may convince a patient that a musculoskeletal condition is less severe than it is, or that it has healed. This misunderstanding can lead to overexertion and a delay in the healing process or even to permanent injury,” said ACA President Anthony Hamm, DC.

President Hamm noted that people in pain should be informed of all management strategies, including non-drug approaches such as chiropractic, to reduce their risk of overuse and addiction.

Each patient is unique, and care plans should be tailored to focus on what is the safest, most effective treatment for the individual. Chiropractic physicians stand ready to work together with medical physicians to help address this epidemic that has caused unnecessary suffering, enormous loss of human potential and massive financial and personal costs,” he added.

Fortunately, health care quality organizations have begun to recognize the value of this conservative, multidisciplinary approach. Earlier this year, the Joint Commission, which certifies more than 20,000 health care organizations and programs in the United States, including every major hospital, revised its pain management standard to include chiropractic services and acupuncture. Clinical experts in pain management who provide input to the commission’s standards affirmed that treatment strategies may consider both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches.   

 

During NCHM this fall, ACA will offer chiropractic physicians resources to help them share information about their conservative approach and why it is especially significant to today’s health care consumers amidst the opioid epidemic.

Craniocervical Chiropractic Procedures – A Précis of Upper Cervical Chiropractic

By |August 9, 2015|Chiropractic Care, Upper Cervical Adjusting|

Craniocervical Chiropractic Procedures –
A Précis of Upper Cervical Chiropractic

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Can Chiropr Assoc 2015 (Jun);   59 (2):   173–192 ~ FULL TEXT

H. Charles Woodfield, III, BPhm, DC, Craig York, DC.
Roderic P. Rochester, DC, Scott Bales, DC,
Mychal Beebe, DC, Bryan Salminen, DC,
Jeffrey N. Scholten, DC .

Director of Research –
Upper Cervical Research Foundation,
Minneapolis, MN


Presented here is a narrative review of upper cervical procedures intended to facilitate understanding and to increase knowledge of upper cervical chiropractic care. Safety, efficacy, common misconceptions, and research are discussed, allowing practitioners, chiropractic students, and the general public to make informed decisions regarding utilization and referrals for this distinctive type of chiropractic care. Upper cervical techniques share the same theoretical paradigm in that the primary subluxation exists in the upper cervical spine. These procedures use similar assessments to determine if spinal intervention is necessary and successful once delivered. The major difference involves their use of either an articular or orthogonal radiograph analysis model when determining the presence of a misalignment. Adverse events following an upper cervical adjustment consist of mild symptomatic reactions of short-duration (< 24-hours). Due to a lack of quality and indexed references, information contained herein is limited by the significance of literature cited, which included non-indexed and/or non-peer reviewed sources.

KEYWORDS:   adverse events; atlas; cervical; chiropractic; chiropractic adjustment; craniocervical


From the Full-Text Article:

Introduction:

The indexed literature reports the existence of many upper cervical (UC) procedures. [1, 2] Presented here is a brief narrative review or narrative description of upper cervical techniques (UCT) with the intention of increasing knowledge and understanding regarding their effectiveness and utilization. Procedural similarities and differences between UCT are examined. As chiropractic goes the way of other healing professions through stratification into specialties, this characterization of upper cervical procedures can create appreciation and clarity both inside and outside the profession.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Technique Page

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What Effect Does Chiropractic Treatment Have on Gastrointestinal (GI) Disorder

By |August 6, 2015|Chiropractic Care, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Visceral Disease|

What Effect Does Chiropractic Treatment Have on Gastrointestinal (GI) Disorders: A Narrative Review of the Literature

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Can Chiropr Assoc 2015 (Jun);   59 (2):   122–133 ~ FULL TEXT

Katherine Angus, BSc(Kin), DC, Sepideh Asgharifar, BSc(Hons), DC,
Brian Gleberzon, DC, MHSc

Chiropractic and Health Associates Clinic,
1 St. Clair Ave West, Suite 404,
Toronto, Ontario.


The purpose of this study was to provide a narrative review of the literature of studies describing the management of disorders of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract using ‘chiropractic therapy’ broadly defined here as spinal manipulation therapy, mobilizations, soft tissue therapy, modalities and stretches. Search limiters include access to full text studies published between 1980 and November 2012 in peer-reviewed journals, English language only involving human subjects. Twenty-one articles were found that met our inclusion criteria. Retrievable articles varied from case reports to clinical trials to review articles of management options. The majority of articles chronicling patient experiences under chiropractic care reported they demonstrated mild to moderate improvements in presenting symptoms. No adverse side effects were reported. This suggests chiropractic care can be considered as an adjunctive therapy for patients with various GI conditions providing there are no co-morbidities.

KEYWORDS:  chiropractic; gastro-intestinal; manipulation; therapy


From the FULL TEXT Article

Introduction

The purpose of this paper was to conduct a narrative review of the literature that investigated the effectiveness of chiropractic treatment for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. A previous review by Gleberzon et al [1] reviewed the literature from 2007 to 2011 that investigated the use of one type of chiropractic treatment (spinal manipulative therapy) for pediatric health conditions one of which was colic, often considered a type of GI condition effecting infants [Authors’ note: there is considerable debate whether or not ‘infantile colic’ is a GI condition, or simply ‘baby back pain’ and there is debate if the method used to monitor its existence (crying time) is a subjective or objective outcome measure. [1] That debate notwithstanding, for the purposes of this report, we have included colic as a GI condition].

There are more articles like this @ our:

Conditions That Respond Well to Chiropractic Page

(more…)

Validity of Palpation of the C1 Transverse Process

By |August 5, 2015|Palpation, Validity Study|

Validity of Palpation of the C1 Transverse Process: Comparison with a Radiographic Reference Standard

The Chiro.Org Blog


J Can Chiropr Assoc 2015 (Jun);   59 (2):   91–100 ~ FULL TEXT

Robert Cooperstein,MA, DC, Morgan Young,DC, and
Makani Lew,DC

Palmer West College of Chiropractic
Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research


Primary goal:   to determine the validity of C1 transverse process (TVP) palpation compared to an imaging reference standard.

METHODS:   Radiopaque markers were affixed to the skin at the putative location of the C1 TVPs in 21 participants receiving APOM radiographs. The radiographic vertical distances from the marker to the C1 TVP, mastoid process, and C2 TVP were evaluated to determine palpatory accuracy.

RESULTS:   Interexaminer agreement for radiometric analysis was “excellent.” Stringent accuracy (marker placed ±4mm from the most lateral projection of the C1 TVP) = 57.1%; expansive accuracy (marker placed closer to contiguous structures) = 90.5%. Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD) = 4.34 (3.65, 5.03) mm; root-mean-squared error = 5.40mm.

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