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Daily Archives: November 20, 2015

Chronicles of Health Creation: RAND Report Begs New Look at Integrative Medicine and Health Professionals in the Triple Aim Era

By |November 20, 2015|Complementary and Alternative Medicine|

Excerpted from Huffington Post
John Weeks

A recent report from the RAND Corporation describes how regular medicine reduced complementary and alternative medicine professionals to “thing” status — as “modalities” — in the first years of the integrative medicine era.

The title of the report is “Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Professions or Modalities?” The discussions among policy makers, practitioners and delivery system leaders synthesized in the 75-page document beg a more significant question: Does the emergence of values-based medicine urge a major re-think regarding the potential contributions of these professionals?

The case statement by RAND’s Patricia Herman, ND, PhD and Ian Coulter, PhD begins with a blunt irony. “One of the hallmarks of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is treatment of the whole person.” Yet in the fee-for-service procedure and production orientation of the medical industry, licensed practitioners of chiropractic, acupuncture and Oriental medicine, and naturopathic medicine were typically stripped of this core value — treating the whole person — before being put to any use.

Regular medicine’s dominant influence when “CAM” integration by medical delivery organizations began in the mid-1990s was the industrial value of service production. Mayo Clinic’s director of innovation captures this concisely when he recently spoke of medicine’s historic focus on “producing” services rather than on “creating health.”

In such an industrial setting, a chiropractor became a thing to be use sparingly. Chiropractor = spinal manipulation for low back pain.

A precedent for this boiling down of a chiropractor’s potential value in human health to thing status was set for chiropractors decades earlier in Medicare. In that even more intransigent fee-for-service era, only adjustment of the spine for low back pain made the grade. Unremunerated was the time that a chiropractor spends in evaluation and management. Most of the chiropractic professional’s education and practice rights were dumped overboard. No value was placed on a chiropractor’s counseling of patients on diet, lifestyle, dietary supplements, or ergonomics, for instance.

Getting into Medicare at all back then was a victory for the field. But a consequence of this limited economic relationship was the rack ’em and crack ’em – as fast as possible method of treatment. Produce!

 

Breast Cancer and Chiropractic

By |November 20, 2015|Cancer|

Breast Cancer and Chiropractic

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   ACANews ~ October 2015

By Jeffrey Sklar, DC

Regional Director of Chiropractic for the
Cancer Treatment Centers of America


Well known celebrities discussing their personal challenges with breast cancer has led to frequent media coverage. Primarily, the focus is on the oncological decisions regarding treatment: whether to have radical surgery along with chemo and radiation, just radiation or take a holistic approach. However, there isn’t much attention drawn to Quality of Life (QoL) factors that parallel the breast cancer patient experience.

In other words, treatment decisions and outcomes often seem to shadow the collateral damage experienced by patients who undergo conventional breast cancer treatment. Many premenopausal women face the inevitable decision to take the drug tamoxifen to help prevent recurrence of the disease at the risk of having menopausal-like symptoms. Also, reconstructive post-mastectomies can lead to complications during the healing process and beyond. These complications may include poor wound healing at the site of reconstruction, as well as the tissue donor site. Frozen shoulder is a common occurrence for post-mastectomy, breast reconstruction patients. Many breast cancer patients are forced to look outside their core oncology team to find services that will help with QoL.

It was reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology that among 453 cancer patients surveyed, 83.3 percent had used at least one complementary alternative medicine (CAM) therapy concurrent with conventional treatment. Another discovery was that 24.7 percent of participants used seven or more CAM therapies. [1]

There are more articles like this @ our:

Cancer and Chiropractic Page

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