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Monthly Archives: May 2016

The Effect of Chiropractic Techniques on the Cobb Angle in Idiopathic Scoliosis Arising in Adolescence

By |May 20, 2016|Scoliosis, Uncategorized|

The Effect of Chiropractic Techniques on the Cobb Angle in Idiopathic Scoliosis Arising in Adolescence

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Phys Ther Sci. 2016 (Apr); 28 (4): 1106–1110

Sunghak Byun, PhD and Dongwook Han, PhD, PT

Department of Physical Therapy,
College of Health and Welfare,
Silla University, Republic of Korea.


Purpose   The purpose of this study was to examine whether chiropractic techniques would reduce the curvature of idiopathic scoliosis, which commonly occurs in elementary school children.

Subjects   The subjects of this study were 5 healthy elementary students who listened to an explanation of the study methods and purpose of the study and agreed to participate in the experiment.

Methods   The Cobb angle was measured by taking an X-ray (FCT-1, Dongmun, Goyangsi, Republic of Korea) taken from the rear, using X-ray film. The method of intervention this study used was application of chiropractic techniques. Spinal correction was carried out for 30 minutes per session, which included soft tissue massage, 3 times a week for 8 weeks.

Results   It was established that the Cobb angle was noticeably decreased after 4 weeks of the intervention. Post Hoc analysis revealed that the Cobb angle noticeably decreased after 4 weeks compared with the Cobb angle before the chiropractic techniques were applied. However, no significant difference in Cobb angle was evident after the fourth week.

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Vertical Posture and Head Stability in Patients With Chronic Neck Pain

By |May 19, 2016|Chronic Neck Pain, Whiplash|

Vertical Posture and Head Stability in Patients With Chronic Neck Pain

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Rehabil Med. 2003 (Sep); 35 (5): 229–235

P. Michaelson, M. Michaelson, S. Jaric,
M .L. Latash, P. Sjölander, M. Djupsjöbacka

Southern Lapland Research Department
Vilhelmina, Sweden.


OBJECTIVE:   To evaluate postural performance and head stabilization of patients with chronic neck pain.

DESIGN:   A single-blind comparative group study.

SUBJECTS:   Patients with work-related chronic neck pain (n = 9), with chronic whiplash associated disorders (n = 9) and healthy subjects (n = 16).

METHODS:   During quiet standing in different conditions (e.g. 1 and 2 feet standing, tandem standing, and open and closed eyes) the sway areas and the ability to maintain the postures were measured. The maximal peak-to-peak displacement of the centre of pressure and the head translation were analysed during predictable and unpredictable postural perturbations.

RESULTS:   Patients with chronic neck pain, in particular those with whiplash-associated disorders, showed larger sway areas and reduced ability to successfully execute more challenging balance tasks. They also displayed larger sway areas and reduced head stability during perturbations.

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Chronic Neck Pain and Chiropractic Page

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Variations in Patterns of Utilization and Charges for the Care of Low Back Pain in North Carolina, 2000 to 2009: A Statewide Claims’ Data Analysis

By |May 18, 2016|Cost-Effectiveness, Low Back Pain|

Variations in Patterns of Utilization and Charges for the Care of Low Back Pain in North Carolina, 2000 to 2009: A Statewide Claims’ Data Analysis

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Manip Physiol Ther. 2016 (May); 39 (4): 252–262

Eric L. Hurwitz, DC, PhD, Dongmei Li, PhD,
Jenni Guillen, MS, Michael J. Schneider, DC, PhD,
Joel M. Stevans, DC, Reed B. Phillips, DC, PhD,
Shawn P. Phelan, DC, Eugene A. Lewis, DC, MPH,
Richard C. Armstrong, MS, DC,
Maria Vassilaki, MD, MPH, PhD

Office of Public Health Studies,
University of Hawai`i at M?noa,
Honolulu, HI.


OBJECTIVES:   The purpose of the study was to compare utilization and charges generated by medical doctors (MD), doctors of chiropractic (DC) and physical therapists (PT) by patterns of care for the treatment of low back pain in North Carolina.

METHODS:   This was an analysis of low-back-pain-related closed claim data from the North Carolina State Health Plan for Teachers and State Employees from 2000 to 2009. Data were extracted from Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina for the North Carolina State Health Plan using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision diagnostic codes for:

uncomplicated low back pain   (ULBP) and
complicated low back pain   (CLBP).

RESULTS:   Care patterns with single-provider types and no referrals incurred the least charges on average for both ULBP and CLBP. When care did not include referral providers or services, for ULBP, MD and DC care was on average $465 less than MD and PT care. For CLBP, MD and DC care averaged $965 more than MD and PT care. However, when care involved referral providers or services, MD and DC care was on average $1600 less when compared to MD and PT care for ULBP and $1885 less for CLBP. Risk-adjusted charges (available 2006-2009) for patients in the middle quintile of risk were significantly less for DC care patterns.

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Low Back Pain and Chiropractic Page

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Prevalence and Tracking of Back Pain
From Childhood to Adolescence

By |May 17, 2016|Pediatrics, Spinal Joint Pain|

Prevalence and Tracking of Back Pain
From Childhood to Adolescence

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:  

Per Kjaer, Niels Wedderkopp, Lars Korsholm
and Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde

Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics,
Part of Clinical Locomotion Network,
University of Southern Denmark,
Campusvej 55, DK-5230, Odense, Denmark.


BACKGROUND:   It is generally acknowledged that back pain (BP) is a common condition already in childhood. However, the development until early adulthood is not well understood and, in particular, not the individual tracking pattern. The objectives of this paper are to show the prevalence estimates of BP, low back pain (LBP), mid back pain (MBP), neck pain (NP), and care-seeking because of BP at three different ages (9, 13 and 15 years) and how the BP reporting tracks over these age groups over three consecutive surveys.

METHODS:   A longitudinal cohort study was carried out from the years of 1997 till 2005, collecting interview data from children who were sampled to be representative of Danish schoolchildren. BP was defined overall and specifically in the three spinal regions as having reported pain within the past month. The prevalence estimates and the various patterns of BP reporting over time are presented as percentages.

RESULTS:   Of the 771 children sampled, 62%, 57%, and 58% participated in the three back surveys and 34% participated in all three. The prevalence estimates for children at the ages of 9, 13, and 15, respectively, were for BP 33%, 28%, and 48%; for LBP 4%, 22%, and 36%; for MBP 20%, 13%, and 35%; and for NP 10%, 7%, and 15%. Seeking care for BP increased from 6% and 8% at the two youngest ages to 34% at the oldest. Only 7% of the children who participated in all three surveys reported BP each time and 30% of these always reported no pain. The patterns of development differed for the three spinal regions and between genders. Status at the previous survey predicted status at the next survey, so that those who had pain before were more likely to report pain again and vice versa. This was most pronounced for care-seeking.

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Chiropractic Pediatrics Section

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Is Puberty a Risk Factor For Back Pain in the Young?

By |May 14, 2016|Low Back Pain, Pediatrics|

Is Puberty a Risk Factor For Back Pain in the Young? A Systematic Critical Literature Review

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2014 (Oct 15); 22 (1): 27

Arnaud Lardon, Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde,
Christine Le Scanff and
Niels Wedderkopp

EA 4532 CIAMS, Université Paris-Sud,
UFR STAPS, 91405 Orsay, France ;
Institut Franco-Européen de Chiropraxie,
24 Bld Paul Vaillant Couturier,
94200 Ivry sur Seine, France.


BACKGROUND:   Back pain is a common condition that starts early in life and seems to increase markedly during puberty. A systematic review was performed in order to investigate the link between puberty and back pain, using some Bradford Hill criteria for causality.

OBJECTIVES:   We sought to obtain answers to the following questions: 1) Is there an association between puberty and back pain? If so, how strong is this association? And do the results remain unchanged also when controlling for age and sex? 2) Are the results of the studies consistent? 3) Is there a dose-response, showing a link between the increasing stages of puberty and the subsequent prevalence of back pain? 4) Is there a temporal link between puberty and back pain?

DESIGN:   A systematic critical literature review.

METHODS:   Systematic searches were made in March 2014 in PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and PsycINFO including longitudinal or cross-sectional studies on back pain for subjects <19 years, written in French or English. The review process followed the AMSTAR recommendations. Interpretation was made using some of the Bradford-Hill criteria for causality.

RESULTS:   Four articles reporting five studies were included, two of which were longitudinal. 1) Some studies show a weak and others a strong positive association between puberty and back pain, which remains after controlling for age and sex; 2) Results were consistent across the studies; 3) There was a linear increase of back pain according to the stage of puberty 4) Temporality has not been sufficiently studied.

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Low Back Pain and Chiropractic Page

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Musculoskeletal Pain in Children and Adolescents

By |May 10, 2016|Pediatrics|

Musculoskeletal Pain in Children and Adolescents

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Braz J Phys Ther. 2016 (Feb 16) [Epub]

Steve J. Kamper, Nicholas Henschke, Lise Hestbaek,
Kate M. Dunn, Christopher M. Williams

The George Institute,
University of Sydney, Australia.


Introduction   Musculoskeletal (MSK) pain in children and adolescents is responsible for substantial personal impacts and societal costs, but it has not been intensively or systematically researched. This means our understanding of these conditions is limited, and healthcare professionals have little empirical evidence to underpin their clinical practice. In this article we summarise the state of the evidence concerning MSK pain in children and adolescents, and offer suggestions for future research.

Results   Rates of self-reported MSK pain in adolescents are similar to those in adult populations and they are typically higher in teenage girls than boys. Epidemiological research has identified conditions such as back and neck pain as major causes of disability in adolescents, and in up to a quarter of cases there are impacts on school or physical activities. A range of physical, psychological and social factors have been shown to be associated with MSK pain report, but the strength and direction of these relationships are unclear. There are few validated instruments available to quantify the nature and severity of MSK pain in children, but some show promise. Several national surveys have shown that adolescents with MSK pain commonly seek care and use medications for their condition. Some studies have revealed a link between MSK pain in adolescents and chronic pain in adults.

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Chiropractic Pediatrics Section

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