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Monthly Archives: September 2016

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Spinal Health: The Backbone of Chiropractic’s Identity

By |September 20, 2016|Chiropractic Identity|

Spinal Health: The Backbone of Chiropractic’s Identity

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Journal of Chiropractic Humanities 2016 [Epub]

Richard A. Brown, DC, LLM, FRCC

World Federation of Chiropractic
Toronto, ON


Objectives   The purpose of this commentary is to explore the concepts underpinning professional identity, assess their relevance to chiropractic, and propose a model by which a strong identity for the chiropractic profession may be achieved.

Discussion   The professional identity of chiropractic has been a constant source of controversy throughout its history. Attempts to establish a professional identity have been met with resistance from internal factions divided over linguistics, philosophy, technique, and chiropractic’s place in the health care framework. Consequently, the establishment of a clear identity has been challenging, and the chiropractic profession has failed to capitalize on its potential as the profession of spine care experts.

Recent identity consultations have produced similar statements that position chiropractors as spinal health and well-being experts. Adoption of this identity, however, has not been universal, perpetuating the uncertainty with which the public regards the chiropractic profession.

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Chiropractors As
The Spinal Health Care Experts

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Neck Pain In Children

By |September 17, 2016|Neck Pain, Pediatrics|

Neck Pain In Children: A Retrospective Case Series

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Can Chiropr Assoc. 2016 (Sep); 60 (3): 212–219

Jocelyn Cox, BPhEd, DC,
Christine Davidian, DC, MSc,
Silvano Mior, DC, FCCS, PhD

Graduate Education and Research Department
of Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College


Introduction:   Spinal pain in the pediatric population is a significant health issue, with an increasing prevalence as they age. Pediatric patients attend for chiropractor care for spinal pain, yet, there is a paucity of quality evidence to guide the practitioner with respect to appropriate care planning.

Methods:   A retrospective chart review was used to describe chiropractic management of pediatric neck pain. Two researchers abstracted data from 50 clinical files that met inclusion criteria from a general practice chiropractic office in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada. Data were entered into SPSS 15 and descriptively analyzed.

Results:   Fifty pediatric neck pain patient files were analysed. Patients’ age ranged between 6 and 18 years (mean 13 years). Most (98%) were diagnosed with Grade I-II mechanical neck pain. Treatment frequency averaged 5 visits over 19 days; with spinal manipulative therapy used in 96% of patients. Significant improvement was recorded in 96% of the files. No adverse events were documented.

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Chiropractic Pediatrics Section

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Factors Affecting Return To Work After Injury Or Illness

By |September 15, 2016|Return To Work|

Factors Affecting Return To Work After Injury Or Illness: Best Evidence Synthesis of Systematic Reviews

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2016 (Sep 8)

Carol Cancelliere, James Donovan,
Mette Jensen Stochkendahl, Melissa Biscardi,
Carlo Ammendolia, Corrie Myburgh and J. David Cassidy

Institute of Health Policy,
Management and Evaluation,
Dalla Lana School of Public Health,
University of Toronto,
Toronto, Ontario Canada


BACKGROUND:   Work disability is a major personal, financial and public health burden. Predicting future work success is a major focus of research.

OBJECTIVES:   To identify common prognostic factors for return-to-work across different health and injury conditions and to describe their association with return-to-work outcomes.

METHODS:   Medline, Embase, PsychINFO, Cinahl, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the grey literature were searched from January 1, 2004 to September 1, 2013. Systematic reviews addressing return-to-work in various conditions and injuries were selected. Eligible studies were critically appraised using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria to identify low risk of bias reviews.

RESULTS:   Of the 36,193 titles screened and the 94 eligible studies reviewed, 56 systematic reviews were accepted as low risk of bias. Over half of these focused on musculoskeletal disorders, which were primarily spine related (e.g., neck and low back pain). The other half of studies assessed workers with mental health or cardiovascular conditions, stroke, cancer, multiple sclerosis or other non-specified health conditions. Many factors have been assessed, but few consistently across conditions. Common factors associated with positive return-to-work outcomes were higher education and socioeconomic status, higher self-efficacy and optimistic expectations for recovery and return-to-work, lower severity of the injury/illness, return-to-work coordination, and multidisciplinary interventions that include the workplace and stakeholders. Common factors associated with negative return-to-work outcomes were older age, being female, higher pain or disability, depression, higher physical work demands, previous sick leave and unemployment, and activity limitations.

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The Biopsychosocial Model Page

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Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Symptoms in a 31-Year-Old Woman Using Cervical Manipulation and Acupuncture

By |September 13, 2016|Acupuncture|

Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Symptoms in a 31-Year-Old Woman Using Cervical Manipulation and Acupuncture: A Case Report

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Chiropractic Medicine 2015 (Sep); 14 (3): 220–224

Danielle M. Gergen, DC

Oxboro Family Chiropractic,
Bloomington, MN.


OBJECTIVE:   The objective was to describe chiropractic and acupuncture care of a patient with acute mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) symptoms.

CLINICAL FEATURES:   A 31-year-old woman had acute neck pain, headache, dizziness, nausea, tinnitus, difficulty concentrating, and fatigue following a fall. She was diagnosed at an urgent care facility with mTBI immediately following the fall. Pharmaceutical intervention had been ineffective for her symptoms.

INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME:   The patient was treated with chiropractic adjustments characterized as high velocity, low amplitude thrusts directed to the cervical spine and local acupuncture points in the cervical and cranial regions. The patient received care for a total of 8 visits over 2.5 weeks with resolution of concussive symptoms.

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Acupuncture Section and our:

Case Reports Section

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Visceral Responses to Spinal Manipulation

By |September 10, 2016|Spinal Manipulation, Visceral Disease|

Visceral Responses to Spinal Manipulation

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2012 (Oct); 22 (5): 777–784

Philip Bolton, Brian Budgell

School of Biomedical Sciences & Pharmacy,
Faculty of Health,
University of Newcastle,
Callaghan NSW 2308, Australia.
Philip.Bolton@newcastle.edu.au


While spinal manipulation is widely seen as a reasonable treatment option for biomechanical disorders of the spine, such as neck pain and low back pain, the use of spinal manipulation to treat non-musculoskeletal complaints remains controversial. This controversy is due in part to the perception that there is no robust neurobiological rationale to justify using a biomechanical treatment of the spine to address a disorder of visceral function. This paper therefore looks at the physiological evidence that spinal manipulation can impact visceral function. A structured search was conducted, using PubMed and the Index to Chiropractic Literature, to construct of corpus of primary data studies in healthy human subjects of the effects of spinal manipulation on visceral function. The corpus of literature is not large, and the greatest number of papers concerns cardiovascular function. Authors often attribute visceral effects of spinal manipulation to somato-autonomic reflexes. While this is not unreasonable, little attention is paid to alternative mechanisms such as somato-humoural pathways. Thus, while the literature confirms that mechanical stimulation of the spine modulates some organ functions in some cohorts, a comprehensive neurobiological rationale for this general phenomenon has yet to appear.


From the FULL TEXT Article:

Introduction

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Non-musculoskeletal Disorders
and Chiropractic Page

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