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Monthly Archives: March 2017

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Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use by Children with Pain in the United States

By |March 28, 2017|Pediatrics, Spinal Joint Pain|

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use by Children with Pain in the United States

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SOURCE:   Acad Pediatr. 2017 (Feb 20).  pii: S1876-2859(17)30063-3

Cornelius B. Groenewald, MBChB, Sarah E. Beals-Erickson, PhD, Jaime Ralston-Wilson, DAOM, LAc, Jennifer A. Rabbitts, MB, ChB, Tonya M. Palermo, PhD

Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine,
University of Washington School of Medicine and Seattle Children’s Hospital.
M/S MB.11.500, 4800 Sand Point Way NE,
Seattle, WA 98105, USA.


OBJECTIVE:   Chronic pain is reported by 15-25% of children. Growing evidence from clinical samples suggests that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies are desired by families and may benefit some children with pain conditions. The objective of this study is to provide estimates of CAM use by children with pain in the United States.

METHODS:   We analyzed data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to estimate patterns, predictors, and perceived benefits of CAM use among children 4-17 years of age with and without painful conditions in the US. We used χ2 tests to compare the prevalence rates of CAM use among children with pain to CAM use among children without pain. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with CAM use within the group of children with pain conditions.

RESULTS:   Parents reported that 26.6% of children had pain conditions (e.g. headache, abdominal, musculoskeletal pain) in the past year; of these children, 21.3% used CAM. In contrast only 8.1% of children without pain conditions used CAM (χ2: p< .001). CAM use among children with pain was associated with female sex (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=1.49, p=0.005), higher income (aOR=1.61, p=0.027), and presence of 4+ comorbidities (aOR=2.01, p=0.013). Among children with pain who used CAM the 2 most commonly used CAM modalities were biologically-based therapies (47.3%) (e.g., special diets and herbal supplements) and manipulative or body-based therapies (46.3%) (e.g., chiropractic and massage).

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Chiropractic Pediatrics Page and the:

Chiropractic and Spinal Pain Page

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Core Competencies of the Certified Pediatric Doctor of Chiropractic

By |March 27, 2017|Core Competencies, Pediatrics|

Core Competencies of the Certified Pediatric Doctor of Chiropractic: Results of a Delphi Consensus Process

The Chiro.Org Blog


J Evid Based Comp Altern Med. 2016 (Apr); 21 (2): 110–114

Elise Hewitt, DC, DICCP, FICC, Lise Hestbaek, DC, PhD,
Katherine A. Pohlman, DC, MS, DICCP, PhD(c)

Portland Chiropractic Group and University of Western States,
Portland, OR, USA


An outline of the minimum core competencies expected from a certified pediatric doctor of chiropractic was developed using a Delphi consensus process. The initial set of seed statements and substatements was modeled on competency documents used by organizations that oversee chiropractic and medical education. These statements were distributed to the Delphi panel, reaching consensus when 80% of the panelists approved each segment.

The panel consisted of 23 specialists in chiropractic pediatrics (14 females) from across the broad spectrum of the chiropractic profession. Sixty-one percent of panelists had postgraduate pediatric certifications or degrees, 39% had additional graduate degrees, and 74% were faculty at a chiropractic institution and/or in a postgraduate pediatrics program. The panel were initially given 10 statements with related substatements formulated by the study’s steering committee. On all 3 rounds of the Delphi process the panelists reached consensus; however, multiple rounds occurred to incorporate the valuable qualitative feedback received.

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Chiropractic Pediatrics Section

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Self-reported Attitudes, Skills and Use of Evidence-based Practice Among Canadian Doctors of Chiropractic

By |March 25, 2017|Evidence-based Practice|

Self-reported Attitudes, Skills and Use of Evidence-based Practice Among Canadian Doctors of Chiropractic: A National Survey

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Can Chiropr Assoc. 2015 (Dec); 59 (4): 332–348

André E. Bussières, DC, PhD, Lauren Terhorst, PhD,
Matthew Leach, RN, BN (Hons), ND, PhD,
Kent Stuber, DC, MSc, Roni Evans, DC, PhD, and
Michael J. Schneider, DC, PhD

Assistant Professor,
School of Physical and Occupational Therapy,
McGill University
Département Chiropratique,
Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières.


OBJECTIVES:   To identify Canadian chiropractors’ attitudes, skills and use of evidence based practice (EBP), as well as their level of awareness of previously published chiropractic clinical practice guidelines (CPGs).

OBJECTIVES:   7,200 members of the Canadian Chiropractic Association were invited by e-mail to complete an online version of the Evidence Based practice Attitude & utilisation SurvEy (EBASE); a valid and reliable measure of participant attitudes, skills and use of EBP.

RESULTS:   Questionnaires were completed by 554 respondents. (7.7% of those invited) Most respondents (>75%) held positive attitudes toward EBP. Over half indicated a high level of self-reported skills in EBP, and over 90% expressed an interest in improving these skills. A majority of respondents (65%) reported over half of their practice was based on evidence from clinical research, and only half (52%) agreed that chiropractic CPGs significantly impacted on their practice.

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Attitudes and Opinions of Doctors of Chiropractic Specializing in Pediatric Care Toward Patient Safety

By |March 24, 2017|Chiropractic Care, Pediatrics, Safety|

Attitudes and Opinions of Doctors of Chiropractic Specializing in Pediatric Care Toward Patient Safety: A Cross-sectional Survey

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2016 (Sep); 39 (7): 487–493

Katherine A. Pohlman, DC, MS, Linda Carroll, PhD,
Lisa Hartling, PhD, MSc, Ross Tsuyuki, PharmD, MSc,
Sunita Vohra, MD, MSc

Research Institute,
Parker University,
Dallas, TX.


OBJECTIVE:   The purpose of this cross-sectional survey was to evaluate attitudes and opinions of doctors of chiropractic (DCs) specializing in pediatric care toward patient safety.

METHODS:   The Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality was adapted for providers who use spinal manipulation therapy and sent out to 2 US chiropractic organizations’ pediatric council members (n = 400) between February and April 2014. The survey measured 12 patient safety dimensions and included questions on patient safety items and quality issues, information exchange, and overall clinic ratings. Data analyses included a percent composite average and a nonrespondent analysis.

RESULTS:   The response rate was 29.5% (n = 118). Almost one- third of respondents’ patients were pediatric (≤17 years of age). DCs with a pediatric certification were 3 times more likely to respond (P < .001), but little qualitative differences were found in responses. The patient safety dimensions with the highest positive composite percentages were Organizational Learning (both administration and clinical) and Teamwork (>90%). Patient Care Tracking/Follow-up and Work Pressure and Pace were patient safety dimensions that had the lowest positive composite scores (<85%). The responses also indicated that there was concern regarding information exchange with insurance/third-party payors. Two quality issues identified for improvement were (1) updating a patient’s medication list and (2) following up on critically abnormal results from a laboratory or imaging test within 1 day. The average overall patient safety rating score indicated that 83% of respondents rated themselves as “very good” or “excellent.”

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Chiropractic Pediatrics Section

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Primary Prevention in Chiropractic Practice: A Systematic Review

By |March 23, 2017|Prevention, Wellness Care|

Primary Prevention in Chiropractic Practice:
A Systematic Review

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2017 (Mar 14); 25: 9

Guillaume Goncalves, Christine Le Scanff1, and
Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde

CIAMS,
University of Paris-Sud,
University of Paris-Saclay


Background   Chiropractors are primarily concerned with musculoskeletal disorders but have the responsibility to deal also with prevention in other areas.

Objectives   To establish the prevalence of chiropractors who have a positive opinion on the use of primary prevention (PP), their actual use of PP, and the proportion of patients who consult for PP in relation to

(i)   musculoskeletal disorders,
(ii)   public health issues, or
(iii)   chiropractic treatment for wellness.

Method   A systematic search for literature was done using PubMed, Embase, Index to Chiropractic Literature, and and updated on February 15th 2017. Inclusion criteria were: surveys on chiropractors and/or chiropractic patients, information had to be present on PP in relation to the percentage of patients who consult for PP in chiropractic practice or in a chiropractic student clinic, and/or the percentage of chiropractors who reported using PP, and/or information on chiropractors’ opinions of the use of PP, in the English, French, or Scandinavian languages. The review followed the PRISMA guidelines. Articles were classified as ‘good’, ‘acceptable’ and ‘unacceptable’ based on scores of quality items. Results from the latter group were not taken into account.

Results   Twenty-five articles were included, reporting on twenty-six studies, 19 of which dealt with wellness. The proportion of chiropractors who stated that they had a positive opinion on primary prevention (PP) was generally higher than the proportion of chiropractors offering PP. Most chiropractors offered some type of PP for musculoskeletal disorders and more than a half stated that they did so in the public health area but also for wellness. For all types of PP, however, it was rarely stated to be the reason for patients consulting. Regardless the type of PP, the proportion of patients who actually consulted specifically for PP was much smaller than the proportion of chiropractors offering PP.

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Health Promotion & Wellness Page

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A Videofluoroscopy-based Tracking Algorithm for Quantifying the Time Course of Human Intervertebral Displacements

By |March 20, 2017|Spinal Alignment, Videofluoroscopy|

A Videofluoroscopy-based Tracking Algorithm for Quantifying the Time Course of Human Intervertebral Displacements

The Chiro.Org Blog


Comput Methods Biomech Biomed Engin. 2017 (Mar 15): 1-9

Christian Balkovec, Jim H. Veldhuis,
John W. Baird, G. Wayne Brodland &
Stuart M. McGill

Department of Kinesiology,
University of Waterloo,
Waterloo, Canada.


The motions of individual intervertebral joints can affect spine motion, injury risk, deterioration, pain, treatment strategies, and clinical outcomes. Since standard kinematic methods do not provide precise time-course details about individual vertebrae and intervertebral motions, information that could be useful for scientific advancement and clinical assessment, we developed an iterative template matching algorithm to obtain this data from videofluoroscopy images.

To assess the bias of our approach, vertebrae in an intact porcine spine were tracked and compared to the motions of high-contrast markers. To estimate precision under clinical conditions, motions of three human cervical spines were tracked independently ten times and vertebral and intervertebral motions associated with individual trials were compared to corresponding averages. Both tests produced errors in intervertebral angular and shear displacements no greater than 0.4° and 0.055 mm, respectively.

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Spinal Alignment and Cervical Curve Page

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