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Daily Archives: May 1, 2017

For Bad Backs, It May Be Time to Rethink Biases About Chiropractors

By |May 1, 2017|Chiropractic Care, Nonpharmacologic Therapies|

For Bad Backs, It May Be Time to Rethink Biases About Chiropractors

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   The New York Times ~ 5-01-2017

Aaron E. Carroll, MD, MS

Indiana University School of Medicine



About two of every three people will probably experience significant low back pain at some point. A physician like me might suggest any number of potential treatments and therapies. But one I never considered was a referral for spinal manipulation.

It appears I may have been mistaken. For initial treatment of lower back pain, it may be time for me (and other physicians) to rethink our biases.

Spinal manipulation — along with other less traditional therapies like heat, meditation and acupuncture — seems to be as effective as many other more medical therapies we prescribe, and as safe, if not safer.

Most back pain resolves over time, so interventions that focus on relief of symptoms and allow the body to heal are ideal. Many of these can be nonpharmacological in nature, like the work done by chiropractors or physical therapists.

Physicians are traditionally wary of spinal manipulation (applying pressure on bones and joints), in part because the practitioners are often not doctors and also because a few chiropractors have claimed they can address conditions that have little to do with the spine. Patients with back pain haven’t seemed as skeptical. A large survey of them from 2002 through 2008 found that more than 30 percent sought chiropractic care, significantly more than those who sought massage, acupuncture or homeopathy.

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Spinal Manipulative Therapy Has an Immediate Effect on Thermal Pain Sensitivity in People With Low Back Pain

By |May 1, 2017|Pain Relief, Spinal Manipulation, Thermal Pain Sensitivity|

Spinal Manipulative Therapy Has an Immediate Effect on Thermal Pain Sensitivity in People With Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Phys Ther. 2009 (Dec); 89 (12): 1292–1303

Parvaneh Mohammadian, PhD, Antonio Gonsalves, DC,
Chris Tsai, DC, Thomas Hummel, MD, and
Thomas Carpenter, DC

Department of Physical Therapy,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32610-0154, USA.


BACKGROUND:   Current evidence suggests that spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) is effective in the treatment of people with low back pain (LBP); however, the corresponding mechanisms are unknown. Hypoalgesia is associated with SMT and is suggestive of specific mechanisms.

OBJECTIVE:   The primary purpose of this study was to assess the immediate effects of SMT on thermal pain perception in people with LBP. A secondary purpose was to determine whether the resulting hypoalgesia was a local effect and whether psychological influences were associated with changes in pain perception.

DESIGN:   This study was a randomized controlled trial.

SETTING:   A sample of convenience was recruited from community and outpatient clinics.

PARTICIPANTS:   Thirty-six people (10 men, 26 women) currently experiencing LBP participated in the study. The average age of the participants was 32.39 (SD=12.63) years, and the average duration of LBP was 221.79 (SD=365.37) weeks.

INTERVENTION AND MEASUREMENTS:   Baseline demographic and psychological measurements were obtained, followed by quantitative sensory testing to assess temporal summation and Adelta fiber-mediated pain perception. Next, participants were randomly assigned to ride a stationary bicycle, perform low back extension exercises, or receive SMT. Finally, the same quantitative sensory testing protocol was reassessed to determine the immediate effects of each intervention on thermal pain sensitivity.

RESULTS:   Hypoalgesia to A-delta fiber-mediated pain perception was not observed. Group-dependent hypoalgesia of temporal summation specific to the lumbar innervated region was observed. Pair-wise comparisons indicated significant hypoalgesia in participants who received SMT, but not in those who rode a stationary bicycle or performed low back extension exercises. Psychological factors did not significantly correlate with changes in temporal summation in participants who received SMT.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Subluxation Neurology Section

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