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Monthly Archives: November 2017

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What Is Chiropractic?

By |November 25, 2017|Chiropractic Identity|

What Is Chiropractic?

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2017 (Nov 2); 25: 30

Jan Hartvigsen and Simon French

Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics,
University of Southern Denmark,
Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M, Denmark.


While in some jurisdictions chiropractic is fully integrated in public and insurance funded health care systems, in others it is outside and considered as complementary or alternative health care. There is a paucity of data and rigorous scientific studies regarding most aspects of chiropractic practice although research activity has been increasing in recent years. We call for papers for a thematic series in Chiropractic and Manual Therapies that can help define chiropractic better to stakeholders inside and outside the profession under the theme What is Chiropractic?

KEYWORDS:   Chiropractic; Editorial; Health policy


From the Full-Text Article:

Background

In 2002, Meeker and Haldeman wrote that “In today’s dynamic health care milieu, chiropractic stands at the crossroads of mainstream and alternative medicine”. [1] Fifteen years later the global identity and place for chiropractic in healthcare is still unresolved. From within chiropractic, one end of the spectrum subscribes to “a philosophy of neo-vitalism” and “a neurologically-centered model of subluxation” [2], while the other end promotes that “chiropractic education should be ……… founded on the principles of evidence-based care” and “the teaching of vertebral subluxation complex as a vitalistic construct that claims that it is the cause of disease is unsupported by evidence”. [3]

There are more articles like this @ our:

The Chiropractic Identity Page

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Clinical Examination Findings as Prognostic Factors in Low Back Pain

By |November 24, 2017|Clinical Decision-making|

Clinical Examination Findings as Prognostic Factors in Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review of the Literature

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2015 (Mar 23); 23: 13

Lisbeth Hartvigsen, Alice Kongsted, and Lise Hestbaek

Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics,
University of Southern Denmark,
Odense, Denmark.


BACKGROUND:   There is a strong tradition of performing a clinical examination of low back pain (LBP) patients and this is generally recommended in guidelines. However, establishing a pathoanatomic diagnosis does not seem possible in most LBP patients and clinical tests may potentially be more relevant as prognostic factors. The aim of this review of the literature was to systematically assess the association between low-tech clinical tests commonly used in adult patients with acute, recurrent or chronic LBP and short- and long-term outcome.

METHODS:   MEDLINE, Embase, and MANTIS were searched from inception to June 2012. Prospective clinical studies of adult patients with LBP with or without leg pain and/or signs of nerve root involvement or spinal stenosis, receiving non-surgical or no treatment, which investigated the association between low-tech clinical tests and outcome were included. Study selection, data extraction and appraisal of study quality were performed independently by two reviewers.

RESULTS:   A total of 5,332 citations were retrieved and screened for eligibility, 342 articles were assessed as full text and 49 met the inclusion criteria. Due to clinical and statistical heterogeneity, qualitative synthesis rather than meta-analysis was performed. Associations between clinical tests and outcomes were often inconsistent between studies. In more than one third of the tests, there was no evidence of the tests being associated with outcome. Only two clinical tests demonstrated a consistent association with at least one of the outcomes: centralization and non-organic signs.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Low Back Pain and Chiropractic Page

and the:

Clinical Prediction Rule Page

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JFK’s assassination aided by his bad back, records show

By |November 22, 2017|back pain|

Source CNN

Every November the United States remembers Camelot: a shining time of promise led by John F. Kennedy, the nation’s youngest president brought to an abrupt and bloody end on this day in 1963. While conspiracy theorists debate who pulled the trigger, there’s another culprit that often goes unmentioned: Kennedy’s lifelong struggle with back pain.

It was his habit of wearing a tightly laced back brace that may have kept him from recoiling to the floor of his car after the assassin’s first bullet struck him in the neck.

“The brace was a firmly bound corset, around his hips and lower back and higher up,” said Dr. Thomas Pait, a spinal neurosurgeon who co-authored a paper about Kennedy’s failed back surgeries and other treatments such as manipulation under anesthesia.  “He tightly laced it and put a wide Ace bandage around in a figure eight around his trunk. If you think about it, if you have that brace all the way up your chest, above your nipples, and real tight, are you going to be able to bend forward?”

Read more on the CNN website.

The Infant with Dysfunctional Feeding Patterns

By |November 21, 2017|Breastfeeding Dysfunction|

The Infant with Dysfunctional Feeding Patterns –
The Chiropractic Assessment

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Clin Chiropractic Pediatrics 2016 (May);   15 (2)

Sharon Vallone, DC, FICCP and
Faraneh Carnegie-Hargreaves, DC

Private practice,
South Windsor,
Connecticut, USA


The World Health Organization recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of an infant’s life, followed by the introduction of complementary foods while breastfeeding for 2 years and beyond. Early and consistent breastfeeding support can often make the difference in a dyad’s ability to establish a functional breastfeeding relationship. While challenged dyads can sometimes accomplish competent breastfeeding given appropriate support, necessary interventions, and an opportunity to learn; timing is critical when a neonate has not been transferring adequate milk volume or is managing feeding in a passive or compensatory manner.

Chiropractors should be most familiar with the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal dysfunctions that could result in an inability to feed. They should also recognize and treat the compensatory changes that will develop in a healthy, neurotypical neonate who is challenged by an inability to feed efficiently in order to prevent the evolution of long term physiologic and postural ramifications.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Pediatrics Page

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Evaluation and Treatment of Breastfeeding Difficulties Associated with Cervicocranial Dysfunction

By |November 18, 2017|Breastfeeding Dysfunction|

Evaluation and Treatment of Breastfeeding Difficulties Associated with Cervicocranial Dysfunction:
A Chiropractic Perspective

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Clin Chiropractic Pediatrics 2016 (Dec); 15 (3): 1301

Sharon Vallone, DC, FICCP

Private Practice,
KIDSPACE Adaptive Play and Wellness,
South Windsor, Connecticut, USA


Increasingly, parents are presenting to the chiropractic office with the chief complaint of breastfeeding dysfunction. Early and consistent breastfeeding support is paramount to the dyad’s ability to establish a functional breastfeeding relationship. It is critical that chiropractors treating this population recognize feeding dysfunction and understand the mechanics of breastfeeding, what might alter those mechanics, and the importance of the role of the International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) in supporting the restoration of functional breastfeeding after the chiropractic adjustments have reduced the neuromusculoskeletal (NMSK) dysfunction. This paper outlines some of the mechanical dysfunctions that might interfere with the normal transfer of milk for a neonate.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Pediatrics Page

(more…)