November 2017
M T W T F S S
« Oct   Dec »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

Archives

The Infant with Dysfunctional Feeding Patterns

The Infant with Dysfunctional Feeding Patterns –
The Chiropractic Assessment

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Clin Chiropractic Pediatrics 2016 (May);   15 (2)

Sharon Vallone, DC, FICCP and
Faraneh Carnegie-Hargreaves, DC

Private practice,
South Windsor,
Connecticut, USA


The World Health Organization recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of an infant’s life, followed by the introduction of complementary foods while breastfeeding for 2 years and beyond. Early and consistent breastfeeding support can often make the difference in a dyad’s ability to establish a functional breastfeeding relationship. While challenged dyads can sometimes accomplish competent breastfeeding given appropriate support, necessary interventions, and an opportunity to learn; timing is critical when a neonate has not been transferring adequate milk volume or is managing feeding in a passive or compensatory manner.

Chiropractors should be most familiar with the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal dysfunctions that could result in an inability to feed. They should also recognize and treat the compensatory changes that will develop in a healthy, neurotypical neonate who is challenged by an inability to feed efficiently in order to prevent the evolution of long term physiologic and postural ramifications.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Pediatrics Page

Key words:   breastfeeding, dysfunctional feeding, chiropractic, International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, tethered oral tissue, tongue tie, lip tie, neonate, pediatric.


From the FULL TEXT Article:

Introduction

The World Health Organization recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of an infant’s life, followed by the introduction of complementary foods while breastfeeding for 2 years and beyond. [1]

According to the 2014 breastfeeding report card produced by the CDC, breastfeeding rates continue to rise in the United States. In 2011, 79% of newborn infants started to breastfeed, 49% were breastfeeding at 6 months, and 27% at 12 months. (However, it is important to note that this does not represent exclusivity, as another CDC report states that exclusivity rates did not rise between 2002 and 2012). [2] Additionally, the number of IBCLCs (International Board Certified Lactation Consultants), and others trained to support breastfeeding in various clinical and community settings has also increased. [3, 4] Short-term risks of artificial-feeding have been well-documented across the literature and include increased obesity and incidence of infection — including acute otitis media, respiratory tract and gastrointestinal infection. In the long term, failure to breastfeed is likely a factor in the development of inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and diabetes. Artificial-feeding has also been associated with increased blood pressure and cholesterol levels in adulthood. [5]

Early and consistent breastfeeding support can often make the difference in a dyad’s ability to establish a functional breastfeeding relationship. [6] Despite the fact that challenged dyads can still accomplish successful breastfeeding given time-appropriate support and interventions, timing is critical when a neonate has not been transferring milk. If released from the hospital without appropriate assessment of latch and transfer, symptoms may not appear until the dyad has gone home and the neonate’s status can rapidly decline. Neifert (2001) makes a compelling argument for the importance of recognizing and resolving breastfeeding dysfunction as it affects neonatal health: “Clinicians must overcome the tendency to view the complications of mismanaged breastfeeding as an indictment of the “process”. Instead, pediatric practitioners are obligated to confront the reality of breastfeeding failure, identify associated risk factors and implement intervention strategies to prevent infant morbidity.” [7]


Read the rest of this Full Text article now!


Leave a Reply