September 2016
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

Archives

Please support our Sponsors

Spinal Health: The Backbone of Chiropractic’s Identity

Spinal Health: The Backbone of Chiropractic’s Identity

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Journal of Chiropractic Humanities 2016 [Epub]

Richard A. Brown, DC, LLM, FRCC

World Federation of Chiropractic
Toronto, ON


Objectives   The purpose of this commentary is to explore the concepts underpinning professional identity, assess their relevance to chiropractic, and propose a model by which a strong identity for the chiropractic profession may be achieved.

Discussion   The professional identity of chiropractic has been a constant source of controversy throughout its history. Attempts to establish a professional identity have been met with resistance from internal factions divided over linguistics, philosophy, technique, and chiropractic’s place in the health care framework. Consequently, the establishment of a clear identity has been challenging, and the chiropractic profession has failed to capitalize on its potential as the profession of spine care experts.

Recent identity consultations have produced similar statements that position chiropractors as spinal health and well-being experts. Adoption of this identity, however, has not been universal, perpetuating the uncertainty with which the public regards the chiropractic profession.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractors As
The Spinal Health Care Experts

Continue reading Spinal Health: The Backbone of Chiropractic’s Identity

Chiropractic Turns 121, And Still Going Strong!

Chiropractic Turns 121!

The Chiro.Org Blog




Old Dad Chiro, D.D. Palmer



3 Generations of Palmers



Ronald Reagan Broadcasts for Chiropractic


Continue reading Chiropractic Turns 121, And Still Going Strong!

Neck Pain In Children

Neck Pain In Children: A Retrospective Case Series

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Can Chiropr Assoc. 2016 (Sep); 60 (3): 212–219

Jocelyn Cox, BPhEd, DC,
Christine Davidian, DC, MSc,
Silvano Mior, DC, FCCS, PhD

Graduate Education and Research Department
of Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College


Introduction:   Spinal pain in the pediatric population is a significant health issue, with an increasing prevalence as they age. Pediatric patients attend for chiropractor care for spinal pain, yet, there is a paucity of quality evidence to guide the practitioner with respect to appropriate care planning.

Methods:   A retrospective chart review was used to describe chiropractic management of pediatric neck pain. Two researchers abstracted data from 50 clinical files that met inclusion criteria from a general practice chiropractic office in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada. Data were entered into SPSS 15 and descriptively analyzed.

Results:   Fifty pediatric neck pain patient files were analysed. Patients’ age ranged between 6 and 18 years (mean 13 years). Most (98%) were diagnosed with Grade I-II mechanical neck pain. Treatment frequency averaged 5 visits over 19 days; with spinal manipulative therapy used in 96% of patients. Significant improvement was recorded in 96% of the files. No adverse events were documented.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Pediatrics Section

Continue reading Neck Pain In Children

Factors Affecting Return To Work After Injury Or Illness

Factors Affecting Return To Work After Injury Or Illness: Best Evidence Synthesis of Systematic Reviews

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2016 (Sep 8)

Carol Cancelliere, James Donovan,
Mette Jensen Stochkendahl, Melissa Biscardi,
Carlo Ammendolia, Corrie Myburgh and J. David Cassidy

Institute of Health Policy,
Management and Evaluation,
Dalla Lana School of Public Health,
University of Toronto,
Toronto, Ontario Canada


BACKGROUND:   Work disability is a major personal, financial and public health burden. Predicting future work success is a major focus of research.

OBJECTIVES:   To identify common prognostic factors for return-to-work across different health and injury conditions and to describe their association with return-to-work outcomes.

METHODS:   Medline, Embase, PsychINFO, Cinahl, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the grey literature were searched from January 1, 2004 to September 1, 2013. Systematic reviews addressing return-to-work in various conditions and injuries were selected. Eligible studies were critically appraised using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria to identify low risk of bias reviews.

RESULTS:   Of the 36,193 titles screened and the 94 eligible studies reviewed, 56 systematic reviews were accepted as low risk of bias. Over half of these focused on musculoskeletal disorders, which were primarily spine related (e.g., neck and low back pain). The other half of studies assessed workers with mental health or cardiovascular conditions, stroke, cancer, multiple sclerosis or other non-specified health conditions. Many factors have been assessed, but few consistently across conditions. Common factors associated with positive return-to-work outcomes were higher education and socioeconomic status, higher self-efficacy and optimistic expectations for recovery and return-to-work, lower severity of the injury/illness, return-to-work coordination, and multidisciplinary interventions that include the workplace and stakeholders. Common factors associated with negative return-to-work outcomes were older age, being female, higher pain or disability, depression, higher physical work demands, previous sick leave and unemployment, and activity limitations.

There are more articles like this @ our:

The Biopsychosocial Model Page

Continue reading Factors Affecting Return To Work After Injury Or Illness

Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Symptoms in a 31-Year-Old Woman Using Cervical Manipulation and Acupuncture

Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Symptoms in a 31-Year-Old Woman Using Cervical Manipulation and Acupuncture: A Case Report

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Chiropractic Medicine 2015 (Sep); 14 (3): 220–224

Danielle M. Gergen, DC

Oxboro Family Chiropractic,
Bloomington, MN.


OBJECTIVE:   The objective was to describe chiropractic and acupuncture care of a patient with acute mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) symptoms.

CLINICAL FEATURES:   A 31-year-old woman had acute neck pain, headache, dizziness, nausea, tinnitus, difficulty concentrating, and fatigue following a fall. She was diagnosed at an urgent care facility with mTBI immediately following the fall. Pharmaceutical intervention had been ineffective for her symptoms.

INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME:   The patient was treated with chiropractic adjustments characterized as high velocity, low amplitude thrusts directed to the cervical spine and local acupuncture points in the cervical and cranial regions. The patient received care for a total of 8 visits over 2.5 weeks with resolution of concussive symptoms.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Acupuncture Section and our:

Case Reports Section

Continue reading Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Symptoms in a 31-Year-Old Woman Using Cervical Manipulation and Acupuncture

Visceral Responses to Spinal Manipulation

Visceral Responses to Spinal Manipulation

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2012 (Oct); 22 (5): 777–784

Philip Bolton, Brian Budgell

School of Biomedical Sciences & Pharmacy,
Faculty of Health,
University of Newcastle,
Callaghan NSW 2308, Australia.
Philip.Bolton@newcastle.edu.au


While spinal manipulation is widely seen as a reasonable treatment option for biomechanical disorders of the spine, such as neck pain and low back pain, the use of spinal manipulation to treat non-musculoskeletal complaints remains controversial. This controversy is due in part to the perception that there is no robust neurobiological rationale to justify using a biomechanical treatment of the spine to address a disorder of visceral function. This paper therefore looks at the physiological evidence that spinal manipulation can impact visceral function. A structured search was conducted, using PubMed and the Index to Chiropractic Literature, to construct of corpus of primary data studies in healthy human subjects of the effects of spinal manipulation on visceral function. The corpus of literature is not large, and the greatest number of papers concerns cardiovascular function. Authors often attribute visceral effects of spinal manipulation to somato-autonomic reflexes. While this is not unreasonable, little attention is paid to alternative mechanisms such as somato-humoural pathways. Thus, while the literature confirms that mechanical stimulation of the spine modulates some organ functions in some cohorts, a comprehensive neurobiological rationale for this general phenomenon has yet to appear.


From the FULL TEXT Article:

Introduction

There are more articles like this @ our:

Non-musculoskeletal Disorders
and Chiropractic Page

Continue reading Visceral Responses to Spinal Manipulation

Intertester Reliability and Diagnostic Validity of the
Cervical Flexion-Rotation Test

Intertester Reliability and Diagnostic Validity of the Cervical Flexion-Rotation Test

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2008; 31 (4): 293–300

Toby M. Hall, PT, MS, Kim W. Robinson, PT, BSc,
Osamu Fujinawa, PT, PhD, Kiyokazu Akasaka, PT, PhD,
Elizabeth A. Pyne, PT, MT

School of Physiotherapy,
Curtin University of Technology,
Australia.
halltm@netspace.net.au


OBJECTIVE:   This article evaluates reliability and diagnostic validity of the cervical flexion-rotation test (FRT) to discriminate subjects with headache because of C1/2 dysfunction. In addition, this study evaluates agreement between experienced and inexperienced examiners.

METHODS:   These were 2 single blind comparative measurement study designs. In study 1, 2 experienced blinded examiners evaluated the FRT in 10 asymptomatic controls, 20 subjects with cervicogenic headache (CeH) where C1/2 was the primary dysfunctional level, and 10 subjects with CeH but without C1/2 as the primary dysfunctional level. In study 2, 2 inexperienced and 1 experienced blinded examiners evaluated the FRT in 12 subjects with CeH and 12 asymptomatic controls. Examiners were required to state whether the FRT was positive and also to determine range of rotation using a goniometer. An analysis of variance with planned orthogonal comparison, single measure intraclass correlation coefficient (2,1), and Bland-Altman plot were used to analyze FRT range of rotation between the examiners. Sensitivity, specificity, and examiner agreement for test interpretation were analyzed using cross tabulation and kappa.

RESULTS:   In study 1, sensitivity and specificity of the FRT was 90% and 88% with 92% agreement for experienced examiners (P < .001). Overall diagnostic accuracy was 89% (P < .001) and kappa = 0.85. In study 2, for inexperienced examiners, FRT mobility was significantly greater than for experienced examiners, but sensitivity, specificity, agreement, and kappa values were all within clinically acceptable levels.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Headache and Chiropractic Page

Continue reading Intertester Reliability and Diagnostic Validity of the
Cervical Flexion-Rotation Test

Chiropractic Identity, Role and Future:
A Survey of North American Chiropractic Students

Chiropractic Identity, Role and Future:
A Survey of North American Chiropractic Students

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2015 (Feb 2); 23 (1): 4

Jordan A Gliedt, Cheryl Hawk, Michelle Anderson,
Kashif Ahmad, Dinah Bunn, Jerrilyn Cambron,
Brian Gleberzon, John Hart, Anupama Kizhakkeveettil,
Stephen M Perle, Michael Ramcharan,
Stephanie Sullivan, and Liang Zhang

Logan University College of Chiropractic,
1851 Schoettler Rd,
Chesterfield, MO 63017 USA.


BACKGROUND:   The literature pertaining to chiropractic students’ opinions with respect to the desired future status of the chiropractic physician is limited and is an appropriate topic worthy of study. A previous pilot study was performed at a single chiropractic college. This current study is an expansion of this pilot project to collect data from chiropractic students enrolled in colleges throughout North America.

OBJECTIVE:   The purpose of this study is to investigate North American chiropractic students’ opinions concerning professional identity, role and future.

METHODS:   A 23-item cross-sectional electronic questionnaire was developed. A total of 7,455 chiropractic students from 12 North American English-speaking chiropractic colleges were invited to complete the survey. Survey items encompassed demographics, evidence-based practice, chiropractic identity and setting, and scope of practice. Data were collected and descriptive statistical analysis was performed.

RESULTS:   A total of 1,247 (16.7% response rate) questionnaires were electronically submitted. Most respondents agreed (34.8%) or strongly agreed (52.2%) that it is important for chiropractors to be educated in evidence-based practice. A majority agreed (35.6%) or strongly agreed (25.8%) the emphasis of chiropractic intervention is to eliminate vertebral subluxations/vertebral subluxation complexes. A large number of respondents (55.2%) were not in favor of expanding the scope of the chiropractic profession to include prescribing medications with appropriate advanced training. Most respondents estimated that chiropractors should be considered mainstream health care practitioners (69.1%). Several respondents (46.8%) think that chiropractic research should focus on the physiological mechanisms of chiropractic adjustments.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Prescription Rights and
Expanded Practice Debate Page

Continue reading Chiropractic Identity, Role and Future:
A Survey of North American Chiropractic Students

Results of a National Survey and Examination of Mapping the Health Care Policy Landscape for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Professions Using Expert Panels and Literature Analysis

Results of a National Survey and Examination of Mapping the Health Care Policy Landscape for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Professions Using Expert Panels and Literature Analysis

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2016 (Aug 14) [Epub]

Patricia M. Herman, ND, PhD, Ian D. Coulter, PhD

RAND Health,
Santa Monica, CA.
pherman@rand.org


OBJECTIVES:   The purpose of this project was to examine the policy implications of politically defining complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) professions by their treatment modalities rather than by their full professional scope.

METHODS:   This study used a 2-stage exploratory grounded approach. In stage 1, we identified how CAM is represented (if considered as professions vs modalities) across a purposely sampled diverse set of policy topic domains using exemplars to describe and summarize each. In stage 2 we convened 2 stakeholder panels (12 CAM practitioners and 9 health policymaker representatives), and using the results of stage 1 as a starting point and framing mechanism, we engaged panelists in a discussion of how they each see the dichotomy and its impacts. Our discussion focused on 4 licensed CAM professions: acupuncture and Oriental medicine, chiropractic, naturopathic medicine, and massage.

RESULTS:   Workforce policies affected where and how members of CAM professions could practice. Licensure affected whether a CAM profession was recognized in a state and which modalities were allowed. Complementary and alternative medicine research examined the effectiveness of procedures and modalities and only rarely the effectiveness of care from a particular profession. Treatment guidelines are based on research and also focus on procedures and modalities. Health plan reimbursement policies address which professions are covered and for which procedures/modalities and conditions.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Alternative Medicine Articles Section

Continue reading Results of a National Survey and Examination of Mapping the Health Care Policy Landscape for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Professions Using Expert Panels and Literature Analysis

Comparing 2 Whiplash Grading Systems
To Predict Clinical Outcomes

Comparing 2 Whiplash Grading Systems
To Predict Clinical Outcomes

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Chiropractic Medicine 2016 (Jun); 15 (2): 81–86

Arthur C. Croft, PhD, DC, MSc, MPH, Alireza Bagherian, DC,
Patrick K. Mickelsen, DC, Stephen Wagner, DC

Spine Research Institute of San Diego,
San Diego, CA.


OBJECTIVE:   Two whiplash severity grading systems have been developed: Quebec Task Force on Whiplash-Associated Disorders (QTF-WAD) and the Croft grading system. The majority of clinical studies to date have used the modified grading system published by the QTF-WAD in 1995 and have demonstrated some ability to predict outcome. But most studies include only injuries of lower severity (grades 1 and 2), preventing a broader interpretation. The purpose of this study was assess the ability of these grading systems to predict clinical outcome within the context of a broader injury spectrum.

METHODS:   This study evaluated both grading systems for their ability to predict the bivalent outcome, recovery, within a sample of 118 whiplash patients who were part of a previous case-control designed study. Of these, 36% (controls) had recovered, and 64% (cases) had not recovered. The discrete bivariate distribution between recovery status and whiplash grade was analyzed using the 2-tailed cross-tabulation statistics.

RESULTS:   Applying the criteria of the original 1993 Croft grading system, the subset comprised 1 grade 1 injury, 32 grade 2 injuries, 53 grade 3 injuries, and 32 grade 4 injuries. Applying the criteria of the modified (QTF-WAD) grading system, there were 1 grade 1 injury, 89 grade 2 injuries, and 28 grade 3 injuries. Both whiplash grading systems correlated negatively with recovery; that is, higher severity grades predicted a lower probability of recovery, and statistically significant correlations were observed in both, but the Croft grading system substantially outperformed the QTF-WAD system on this measure.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Whiplash Page

Continue reading Comparing 2 Whiplash Grading Systems
To Predict Clinical Outcomes

PRESCRIPTION RIGHTS: The Timex Topic:
It Took A Licking But Kept On Ticking

PRESCRIPTION RIGHTS: The Timex Topic:
It Took A Licking But Kept On Ticking

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2016 (Aug 24)

Peter C. Emary, Taco A. W. Houweling,
Martin Wangler, Stephen J. Burnie,
Katherine J. Hood and W. Mark Erwin

201C Preston Parkway,
Cambridge, ON
N3H 5E8 Canada.


The last I heard, all the significant National and International Associations, who comprise the Chiropractic Summit had all agreed (back in 2013) that chiropractic should maintain Drug-Free. However, I am also a member of a FaceBook group (Evidence-Informed Chiropractic Medicine) and the topic keeps popping up.

Our Blog has posted on medical resistance to chiropractic’s use of manipulation under anesthesia (MUA), and that one STILL has me scratching my head. After all, the DC isn’t knocking anyone out, a medical anesthesiologist does that, so this inter-professional service benefits both our professions, as well (in theory) the Patient.

We have also posted on the “expanded practice” movement in general, and we don’t need to revisit that here.

So, I have collected all our Blog postings on the prescription rights and “expanded practice” movements into one nice neat package in the new Prescription Rights and Expanded Practice Debate page.

The upper Background Materials section contains all our Blog postings, and the lower Recent Additions section contains this and earlier thoughtful articles on the expanded-practice and prescription rights movement,

The last section is titled Drug Evidence and it includes articles discussing the evidence base for various drugs for spinal pain.

I have no interest in rehashing all those conversations. I hope that if this is a hot topic for you, that you will read all these materials, and then let them percolate. It’s called informed decision. You have to get informed before you set your Profession on a different course. I hope you will take the time to absorb these materials.

A Commentary on the Implications of Medication Prescription Rights for the Chiropractic Profession

Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2016 (Aug 24)

There is a growing desire within the chiropractic profession to expand the scope of practice to include limited medication prescription rights for the treatment of spine-related and other musculoskeletal conditions. Such prescribing rights have been successfully incorporated into a number of chiropractic jurisdictions worldwide. If limited to a musculoskeletal scope, medication prescription rights have the potential to change the present role of chiropractors within the healthcare system by paving the way for practitioners to become comprehensive specialists in the conservative management of spine / musculoskeletal disorders.

However, if the chiropractic profession wishes to lobby to expand the scope of practice to include limited prescriptive authority, several issues must first be addressed. These would include changes to chiropractic education and legislation, as well as consideration of how such privileges could impact the chiropractic profession on a more theoretical basis. In this commentary, we examine the arguments in favour of and against limited medication prescription rights for chiropractors and discuss the implications of such privileges for the profession.

KEYWORDS:   Attitudes; Behaviour; Chiropractic; Drug prescriptions; Evidence-based practice; Knowledge


From the FULL TEXT Article:

Background

Despite a growing number of surveys demonstrating a positive attitude among chiropractors and patients towards the limited use of medication within chiropractic practice, chiropractors remain unable to prescribe medication in most parts of the world [1–8]   (2007 and 2011 Ontario Chiropractic Association member surveys: B. Haig; personal communication, 3 November 2014).   In many countries, chiropractors also lack direct access to musculoskeletal (MSK) diagnostic imaging and laboratory testing – limitations that have real implications for the clinician in accurately diagnosing and managing their patient. Meanwhile, allied health care professions such as optometry, chiropody, and naturopathy have been steadily expanding their respective scopes’ of practice and gaining limited medication prescription rights relevant to their areas of training and expertise. [9–11]   Most notable for chiropractors is that physiotherapists are also interested in and have been granted prescriptive authority in some countries. [12, 13]   Moreover, there are increasing examples of physiotherapists with advanced training in medication prescription and diagnostic testing who now manage patients with MSK disorders at the primary care level. [14–16]

There are more articles like this @ our:

The Prescription Rights and
Expanded Practice Debate Page

Continue reading PRESCRIPTION RIGHTS: The Timex Topic:
It Took A Licking But Kept On Ticking

Is There a Difference in Head Posture and Cervical Spine Movement in Children With and Without Pediatric Headache?

Is There a Difference in Head Posture and Cervical Spine Movement in Children With and Without Pediatric Headache?

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Eur J Pediatr. 2013 (Oct); 172 (10): 1349–1356

Kim Budelmann, Harry von Piekartz, Toby Hall

University of Applied Science,
Osnabrück, Germany


Pediatric headache is an increasingly reported phenomenon. Cervicogenic headache (CGH) is a subgroup of headache, but there is limited information about cervical spine physical examination signs in children with CGH. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was designed to investigate cervical spine physical examination signs including active range of motion (ROM), posture determined by the craniovertebral angle (CVA), and upper cervical ROM determined by the flexion-rotation test (FRT) in children aged between 6 and 12 years. An additional purpose was to determine the degree of pain provoked by the FRT.

Thirty children (mean age 120.70 months [SD 15.14]) with features of CGH and 34 (mean age 125.38 months [13.14]) age-matched asymptomatic controls participated in the study. When compared to asymptomatic controls, symptomatic children had a significantly smaller CVA (p < 0.001), significantly less active ROM in all cardinal planes (p < 0.001), and significantly less ROM during the FRT (p < 0.001), especially towards the dominant headache side (p < 0.001). In addition, symptomatic subjects reported more pain during the FRT (p < 0.001) and there was a significant negative correlation (r = -0.758, p < 0.001) between the range recorded during the FRT towards the dominant headache side and FRT pain intensity score. This study found evidence of impaired function of the upper cervical spine in children with CGH and provides evidence of the clinical utility of the FRT when examining children with CGH.


From the FULL TEXT Article:

Introduction

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Pediatrics Section

and our:

Headache and Chiropractic Page

and our:

Forward Head Posture Page

Continue reading Is There a Difference in Head Posture and Cervical Spine Movement in Children With and Without Pediatric Headache?

Cost-Effectiveness of Non-Invasive and
Non-Pharmacological Interventions for Low Back Pain

Cost-Effectiveness of Non-Invasive and Non-Pharmacological Interventions for Low Back Pain:
A Systematic Literature Review

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Applied Health Econ & Health Policy 2016 (Aug 22)

Lazaros Andronis, Philip Kinghorn, Suyin Qiao,
David G. T. Whitehurst, Susie Durrell, Hugh McLeod

Health Economics Unit,
Public Health Building,
University of Birmingham,
Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK.
l.andronis@bham.ac.uk


BACKGROUND:   Low back pain (LBP) is a major health problem, having a substantial effect on peoples’ quality of life and placing a significant economic burden on healthcare systems and, more broadly, societies. Many interventions to alleviate LBP are available but their cost effectiveness is unclear.

OBJECTIVES:   To identify, document and appraise studies reporting on the cost effectiveness of non-invasive and non-pharmacological treatment options for LBP.

METHODS:   Relevant studies were identified through systematic searches in bibliographic databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database), ‘similar article’ searches and reference list scanning. Study selection was carried out by three assessors, independently. Study quality was assessed using the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria checklist. Data were extracted using customized extraction forms.

RESULTS:   Thirty-three studies were identified. Study interventions were categorised as:

(1) combined physical exercise and psychological therapy,

(2) physical exercise therapy only,

(3) information and education, and

(4) manual therapy.

Interventions assessed within each category varied in terms of their components and delivery. In general, combined physical and psychological treatments, information and education interventions, and manual therapies appeared to be cost effective when compared with the study-specific comparators. There is inconsistent evidence around the cost effectiveness of physical exercise programmes as a whole, with yoga, but not group exercise, being cost effective.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Low Back Pain and Chiropractic Page

and the:

Cost-Effectiveness of Chiropractic Page

Continue reading Cost-Effectiveness of Non-Invasive and
Non-Pharmacological Interventions for Low Back Pain

Diagnostic Testing Considerations in
Pediatric Cervicogenic Headache

Diagnostic Testing Considerations in
Pediatric Cervicogenic Headache

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   ACA News ~ May 23, 2016

Robert Vining, DC and Janice Kane, DC

The Neurological Institute,
Taipei Veterans General Hospital,
Taipei, Taiwan.


We are all aware that children commonly complain of headaches, but determining a specific diagnosis can be challenging. That’s partly because pediatric patients may not describe their symptoms as well as adults. Therefore, we asked this question: “Is there a diagnostic test that helps classify headache in pediatric patients in the range of 6-12 years?” If an evidence-based diagnostic test is available, it may help providers diagnose and develop management strategies.

Cervicogenic headache is common in pediatric patients and is defined by the International Headache Society as a condition caused by cervical spine dysfunction that is usually accompanied by neck pain. We chose this type of headache because it is commonly seen in chiropractic offices. With these thoughts in mind, we performed a search for office-based tests to help substantiate a diagnosis of cervicogenic headache diagnosis in a pediatric patient.

An evidence-based consideration

A PubMed search using the terms pediatric AND headache AND posture produced only a few articles. Included in this list is an article authored by Budelmann et al. describing a cross-sectional study entitled:

Is there a difference in head posture and cervical spine movement in children with and without pediatric headache?
Eur J Pediatr. 2013 (Oct);   172 (10):   1349-56

What happened in this study?

Investigators recruited 34 asymptomatic children from a high school and handball club in Germany and 30 symptomatic patients from physiotherapy departments in the Netherlands. Both groups had a mean age of 10 years (range of 6-12 years).

Criteria utilized for probable cervicogenic headaches were patient reports of:

There are more articles like this @ our:

Headache and Chiropractic Page

Continue reading Diagnostic Testing Considerations in
Pediatric Cervicogenic Headache

The Use of Spinal Manipulation to Treat
an Acute on Field Athletic Injury

The Use of Spinal Manipulation to Treat an Acute on Field Athletic Injury: A Case Report

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Can Chiropr Assoc. 2016 (Jun); 60 (2): 158–163

Sean A. Duquette, BA, DC and
Mohsen Kazemi, RN, DC, MSc., FRCCSS(C), FCCPOR(C),
PhD (Candidate)

Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College.


This case describes the utilization of spinal manipulative therapy for an acute athletic injury during a Taekwondo competition. During the tournament, an athlete had a sudden, non-traumatic, ballistic movement of the cervical spine. This resulted in the patient having a locked cervical spine with limited active motion in all directions. The attending chiropractor assessed the athlete, and deemed manipulation was appropriate. After the manipulation, the athlete’s range of motion was returned and was able to finish the match. Spinal manipulation has multiple positive outcomes for an athlete with an acute injury including the increase of range of motion, decrease in pain and the relaxation of hypertonic muscles. However, there should be some caution when utilizing manipulation during an event.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Case Reports Section

Continue reading The Use of Spinal Manipulation to Treat
an Acute on Field Athletic Injury