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DCs Treating the Multiple Sclerosis Patient

DCs Treating the Multiple Sclerosis Patient

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   ACA News ~ May 2015

By Lori A. Burkhart


Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common disabling neurological disease of young adults, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), most often appearing when people are between 20 and 40 years old. However, it can also affect children and adults over 40. The U.S. National Library of Medicine defines MS as an autoimmune disease that affects the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). The myelin sheath, a protective membrane that wraps around the axon of a nerve cell, is destroyed in a patient with MS; this is caused by inflammation. That damage causes nerve signals to slow down or stop. MS affects women more than men.

Since doctors of chiropractic are recognized as primary contact neuromusculoskeletal specialists, most will have patients with undiagnosed MS come into their practices. The DC will diagnose the patient, treat certain symptoms and make the appropriate referrals.


Diagnosis

Diagnosis of MS is complicated in that it can be severe or mild and can go into remission. NIH points out that initial symptoms often are double or blurred vision, red-green color distortion or blindness in one eye. Most MS patients experience muscle weakness in their extremities and difficulty with coordination and balance.

According to Larry Wyatt, DC, DACBR, FICC, professor and senior faculty, division of clinical sciences at Texas Chiropractic College, MS is diagnosed in a number of ways, as its clinical course is distinctive in each patient and there are different types of MS. Some patients with obvious MS are diagnosed by clinical signs and symptoms (i.e., attacks) alone. These patients will have MS attacks that often relapse for months or even years. In other patients further testing is necessary. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), often with gadolinium enhancement, is the mainstay of diagnosis in most cases. “Patients with MS will very often have multiple high-signal intensity lesions in the brain and/or spinal cord on T2-weighted images,” Dr. Wyatt says. “In addition, cerebrospinal fluid analysis for immunoglobulin content can be quite helpful. There is a specific set of criteria, called the McDonald Criteria, which outline the findings necessary for the diagnosis of the different forms of MS.”

Jason West, DC, DCBCN, a fourth-generation DC who operates a clinic in Pocatello, Idaho, says the majority of the diagnosis comes from the patient history, but he points out that usually when patients with MS come in, they already are diagnosed and they are unhappy with their medical treatment options. “If they weren’t diagnosed, one of the standards is to do an MRI and look for white lesions, and there is also a spinal tap to look for antibodies,” Dr. West says. “Usually these patients have a history of peripheral neuropathy or neurological disease or processes occurring.”


Symptom Management

Continue reading DCs Treating the Multiple Sclerosis Patient

Memorial Day (2015)
In Memory of Those Who Have Fallen

Memorial Day (2015)
In Memory of Those Who Have Fallen

The Chiro.Org Blog


The Bivouac of the Dead

The muffled drum’s sad roll has beat
The soldier’s last tattoo’
No more on life’s parade shall meet
That brave and fallen few;

On Fame’s eternal camping ground
Their silent tents are spread;
But Glory guards with solemn round
The bivouac of the dead.

Continue reading Memorial Day (2015)
In Memory of Those Who Have Fallen

Case Report of a Patient Presenting With Post-concussion Syndrome and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

A Case Report on the Management of a Patient Presenting With Post-concussion Syndrome and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, Using the Upper Cervical Chiropractic Technique

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Topics in Integrative Health Care 2015 (Mar 31);   6 (1)

Scott Bales, DC

180 Parsons Rd #11
Alliston, Ontario, Canada L9R1E8


Introduction:   This case report describes the chiropractic management of a patient with a history of multiple mild traumatic brain injuries, using Upper Cervical manipulative technique.

Clinical Features:   A 42 year old man presenting with symptoms of post-concussion syndrome, and diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.

Intervention and Outcome:   The Kale Upper Cervical Procedure was utilized to assess, monitor, and correct the effects of an upper cervical subluxation in a patient over an 8 week period. The patient reported significant improvement in symptoms of post- concussion syndrome, and small positive improvements in PTSD symptoms. Follow up at 11 months showed continued improvement in most symptoms.

Continue reading Case Report of a Patient Presenting With Post-concussion Syndrome and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder

The Alamo, Part 2: The Texas Medical Association
Continues to Suppress Chiropractic

The Alamo, Part 2: The Texas Medical Association
Continues to Suppress Chiropractic

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Texas Medicine ~ May 2015

By Kara Nuzback


Edited from their article:

The Affordable Care Act promotes collaboration and team treatment of patients. The Texas Medical Association agrees collaborative care is crucial, but the association wants to ensure physicians remain the head of the team. With the Texas Legislature in full swing, physicians face several bills that would challenge that leadership and expand the scope of practice for nurses, chiropractors, and other health professionals without a license to practice medicine.

Fort Worth pediatrician Gary Floyd, MD, says he started testifying before the legislature in defense of patients in the 1990s. Every session, a similar onslaught of bills arises from nonphysician practitioners aiming to expand their scope of practice.

“A lot of them are reaching beyond what they’ve been educated and trained to do, and beyond what their skill sets allow them to do,” he said. “That puts patients in danger.”

These medical professionals also put their own licenses at risk, he says. “When you over-reach, you get in trouble,” he added.

Dr. Floyd does not downplay the need for nurses and other midlevel professionals, but he emphasizes the importance of physician supervision. “They are part of a physician-led health care team,” he said. “We strongly believe that is the best model for delivering care.”


That roughly translates into: They can only do what WE permit, and no more!


This section is quite revealing:

Chiropractors:

TMA has gone up to bat against the Texas Board of Chiropractic Examiners (TBCE) in the past to fight rule changes that would expand chiropractors’ scope.

In 2006, TMA took TBCE to court to invalidate the board’s adoption of rules that would have allowed chiropractors to make diagnoses and perform needle electromyography (EMG) and spinal manipulation under anesthesia (MUA). In 2012, an appellate court invalidated TBCE’s rules allowing EMG and MUA, but it said it had no jurisdiction to consider the diagnosis rule. TMA appealed the diagnosis decision to the Texas Supreme Court the same year, but in 2013, the high court decided not to hear the case. The issue of chiropractors diagnosing medical conditions is not yet resolved.

Continue reading The Alamo, Part 2: The Texas Medical Association
Continues to Suppress Chiropractic

Happy Mother’s Day! (2015)

Happy Mother’s Day!

The Chiro.Org Blog



Women are the backbone of Civilization

Navigating HIPAA in the Electronic Age:
What DCs Must Know

Navigating HIPAA in the Electronic Age:
What DCs Must Know

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   ACA News ~ March 2015

By Gina Shaw


It has been nearly 20 years since the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) was passed and more than five years since its privacy protections for health care consumers were significantly strengthened by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009, as more healthcare transactions became electronic.

But even so, many clinicians — especially those in smaller, often non-hospital-affiliated practices such as chiropractic — may not be up to speed on what they need to do to protect their patients’ privacy in the electronic age and comply with laws like HIPAA and HITECH, says Steven Baker, DC, DABFP, DABCO, a councilor with the Council on Chiropractic Education.

“Pretty much every office has a HIPAA form that they have their patients sign, saying here’s what we can do with your information,” he says. “But often they have just picked it up from a practice management group, and they may not really know what’s on that form or what it obligates them to do.”

So here are a few things every doctor of chiropractic (DC) and chiropractic office staffer should know about electronic privacy:



1.   Do the laws apply to you?

Most health care practitioners are considered “covered entities” under HIPAA and HITECH — but not necessarily all. Healthcare providers are considered covered entities if they electronically transmit “PHI” — protected health information. You can collect individually identifiable health information without transmitting it electronically, although that’s becoming rare these days.

Learn more about HIPPA @ our:

HIPAA Compliance Page

Continue reading Navigating HIPAA in the Electronic Age:
What DCs Must Know

Tylenol Is Ineffective For Treating Low Back Pain or Disability.

The Limits of Tylenol for Pain Relief

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   New York Times ~ April 1, 2015

By Nicholas Bakalar


Acetaminophen, also known as paracetamol (Tylenol) is widely recommended for the relief of back pain and the pain of knee and hip arthritis. But a systematic review of randomized trials has found that it works no better than a placebo.

Australian researchers reviewed three randomized trials that compared acetaminophen with a placebo for the relief of spinal pain, and 10 trials that compared their use for easing the pain of osteoarthritis. All together, the analysis included 5,366 patients. Acetaminophen was given orally in doses between 3,000 and 4,000 milligrams a day, except for one study in which a dose of 1,000 milligrams was administered intravenously.

The review, published online in BMJ (British Medical Journal), found high quality evidence that Tylenol is ineffective in treating low back pain or disability. It also found evidence that the drug quadruples the risk of an abnormal liver function test, but the clinical significance of that finding is unclear.

[Editor’s Note:   Actually, reports as far back as 2001 suggest that 36 percent of acute liver failures are linked to acetaminophen use. Would you like to guess what it costs for a liver transplant, plus the added costs of anti-rejection drugs for a lifetime?   Another review in the American Journal of Medicine estimates that 107,000 patients are hospitalized annually for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-related gastrointestinal (GI) complications (internal bleeding) and at least 16,500 NSAID-related deaths occur each year among arthritis patients alone.   The figures for all NSAID users would be overwhelming, yet the scope of this problem is generally under-appreciated, and under-reported.]

There are more articles like this @ our:

Iatrogenic Injury Page

Continue reading Tylenol Is Ineffective For Treating Low Back Pain or Disability.

Real-Time Visualization of Joint Cavitation

Real-Time Visualization of Joint Cavitation

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   PLoS One. 2015 (Apr 15); 10 (4): e0119470

Gregory N. Kawchuk, Jerome Fryer, Jacob L. Jaremko,
Hongbo Zeng, Lindsay Rowe, Richard Thompson

Department of Physical Therapy,
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine,
University of Alberta,
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


Cracking sounds emitted from human synovial joints have been attributed historically to the sudden collapse of a cavitation bubble formed as articular surfaces are separated. Unfortunately, bubble collapse as the source of joint cracking is inconsistent with many physical phenomena that define the joint cracking phenomenon. Here we present direct evidence from real-time magnetic resonance imaging that the mechanism of joint cracking is related to cavity formation rather than bubble collapse. In this study, ten metacarpophalangeal joints were studied by inserting the finger of interest into a flexible tube tightened around a length of cable used to provide long-axis traction. Before and after traction, static 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired. During traction, rapid cine magnetic resonance images were obtained from the joint midline at a rate of 3.2 frames per second until the cracking event occurred. As traction forces increased, real-time cine magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated rapid cavity inception at the time of joint separation and sound production after which the resulting cavity remained visible. Our results offer direct experimental evidence that joint cracking is associated with cavity inception rather than collapse of a pre-existing bubble. These observations are consistent with tribonucleation, a known process where opposing surfaces resist separation until a critical point where they then separate rapidly creating sustained gas cavities. Observed previously in vitro, this is the first in-vivo macroscopic demonstration of tribonucleation and as such, provides a new theoretical framework to investigate health outcomes associated with joint cracking.

Enjoy this live video demonstration on CTV News Edmonton
NOTE: 30 second commercial as a lead in… sorry

From the FULL TEXT Article:

Introduction

Background

Sounds emitted from human synovial joints vary in their origin. Joint sounds that occur repeatedly with ongoing joint motion arise typically when anatomic structures rub past one another. In contrast, “cracking” sounds require time to pass before they can be repeated despite ongoing joint motion. Although various hypotheses have been proposed over many decades regarding the origin of cracking sounds, none have been validated; the underlying mechanism of cracking sounds remains unknown.

History

Continue reading Real-Time Visualization of Joint Cavitation

JAMA Recommends Chiropractic

JAMA Recommends Chiropractic as First Means of Back Pain Treatment

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   FOX2now

John Pertzborn



Continue reading JAMA Recommends Chiropractic

A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study adding high dose vitamin D to analgesic regimens in patients with musculoskeletal pain

Source Pub Med pubmed/25801891

Lupus. 2015 Apr;24(4-5):483-9. doi: 10.1177/0961203314558676.
Gendelman O, Itzhaki D, Makarov S, Bennun M, Amital H.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The current mode of therapy for many patients with musculoskeletal pain is unsatisfactory.

PURPOSE:

We aimed to assess the impact of adding 4000 IU of vitamin D on pain and serological parameters in patients with musculoskeletal pain.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

This was a randomized, double-blinded and placebo-controlled study assessing the effect of 4000 IU of orally given vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) (four gel capsules of 1000 IU, (SupHerb, Israel) vs. placebo on different parameters of pain. Eighty patients were enrolled and therapy was given for 3 months. Parameters were scored at three time points: prior to intervention, at week 6 and week 12. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores of pain perception were recorded following 6 and 12 weeks. We also measured serum levels of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by ELISA.

Continue reading A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study adding high dose vitamin D to analgesic regimens in patients with musculoskeletal pain

ACA House of Delegates Passes 2 Controversial Resolutions

ACA House of Delegates Passes 2 Controversial Resolutions

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic – April 15, 2015


The American Chiropractic Association’s House of Delegates voted on 30 resolutions at its annual business meeting in Washington D.C., but two in particular took immediate center stage due to their controversial nature.

The first is “Resolution #2 – The Six Key Elements of a Modern Chiropractic Act.” Resolution #2 includes two “elements” that call for “prescriptive authority.” The second, “Resolution #12 – Establishment of College of Pharmacology & Toxicology” establishes the “College of Chiropractic Pharmacology and Toxicology of the American Chiropractic Association.”

To better understand how these resolutions are viewed by ACA delegates – and perhaps the profession at large – we asked Michael Taylor, DC (Oklahoma delegate) and Edward McKenzie, DC (Kansas delegate) to give their opinions regarding the resolutions. (Dr. Taylor, an author on both resolutions, deferred to Tony Hamm, DC, newly re-elected ACA president, who is also an author on Resolution #12.)

Dynamic Chiropractic:   The Six Key Elements of a Modern Chiropractic Act (Resolution #2) includes the following four elements:

1)   “Chiropractic Physician” and “Chiropractic Medicine” as the Regulatory Terms of Licensure;

2)   Scope of Practice Determined by Doctoral and Post-Doctoral Education, Training and Experience Obtained Through Appropriately Accredited Institutions;

3)   Full Management, Referral and Prescription Authority for Patient Examination, Diagnosis, Differential Diagnosis and Health Assessment; and

4)   Full Management, Referral and Prescription Authority for the Care and Treatment of Neuromusculoskeletal and Other Health Conditions or Issues.

In your opinion, do these four elements suggest doctors of chiropractic should have the authority to prescribe drugs?

Dr. Hamm:   No. The American Chiropractic Association supports the Summit statement: “The drug issue is a non-issue because no chiropractic organization in the Summit promotes the inclusion of prescription drug rights and all chiropractic organizations in the Summit support the drug-free approach to health care.”

Dr. McKenzie:   There is a saying in the Midwest: “If it looks like a pig, acts like a pig and smells like a pig … it probably is a pig … and no matter how much lipstick you put on it … it is still a pig.”

In my opinion, it would be hard to draw any other conclusion than to suggest that these elements are there explicitly for the purpose of furthering the agenda towards acquiring prescription authority.

Continue reading ACA House of Delegates Passes 2 Controversial Resolutions

Infant Probiotic Exposure Dramatically Reduces
ADHD or Aspergers

A Possible Link Between Early Probiotic Intervention and the Risk of Neuropsychiatric Disorders Later in Childhood: A Randomized Trial

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Pediatr Res. 2015 (Mar 11) [Epub ahead of print]

Pärtty A, Kalliomäki M, Wacklin P, Salminen S, Isolauri E

Department of Pediatrics,
University of Turku and Turku University Hospital,
Turku, Finland

Finnish Red Cross Blood Service,
Helsinki, Finland.

Functional Foods Forum,
University of Turku,
Turku, Finland.


BACKGROUND:   Recent experimental evidence suggests that gut microbiota may alter function within the nervous system providing new insight on the mechanism of neuropsychiatric disorders.

METHODS:   Seventy-five infants who were randomized to receive Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (ATCC 53103) or placebo during the first 6 mo of life were followed-up for 13 y. Gut microbiota was assessed at the age of 3 wk, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 mo, and 13 y using fluorescein in situ hybridization (FISH) and qPCR, and indirectly by determining the blood group secretor type at the age of 13 y. The diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and Asperger syndrome (AS) by a child neurologist or psychiatrist were based on ICD-10 diagnostic criteria.

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Acidophilus and Pre/Probiotics Page

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ADHD or Aspergers

The Bambino Had A Secret Weapon: Chiropractic

The Bambino Had A Secret Weapon: Chiropractic

The Chiro.Org Blog


Thanks to Dr. Bob Funk, Chiropractor for sharing this photo with us all!

A Randomized Controlled Trial on Treatment of Cervicogenic Sudden Hearing Loss With Chiropractic

A Randomized Controlled Trial on Treatment of Cervicogenic Sudden Hearing Loss With Chiropractic

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Zhongguo Gu Shang. 2015 (Jan);   28 (1):   62–65

Zhou X, Luo HS, He JY, Wang R, Zhuang Y, Zhan Q.


OBJECTIVE:   To investigate the clinical effect and safety of chiropractic in treating cervicogenic sudden hearing loss.

METHODS:   From January 2011 to October 2013, 90 patients with cervicogenic sudden hearing loss were randomly divided into treatment group and control group according to the random number table produced by SPSS 19.0 software. In the treatment group, there were 17 males and 28 females, aged from 31 to 62 years old with an average of (47.57±9.43) years; course of disease was from 1 to 3 days with an average of (1.43±0.68) days; pure-tone audiometry score was from 46.5 to 77.8 dB with the mean of (61.20±9.83) dB; Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ) score was from 17 to 31 scores with an average of (23.46±7.18) scores. In the control group, there were 15 males and 30 females, aged from 28 to 64 years old with an average of (45.77±6.99) years; course of disease was from 1 to 3 days with an average of (1.50±0.73) days; pure-tone audiometry score was from 48.1 to 75.0 dB with the mean of (63.91±8.05) dB; Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ) score was from 20 to 29 scores with an average of (25.61±10.43) scores. The patients of control group were treated with dexamethasone intravenous drip of 10 mg, 3 days later, decreased to 5 mg, 3 days again. And with the methycobal intravenous drip of 500 μg, treatment continued for 10 days. The patients of treatment group were treated with chiropractic additionally except for the therapeutic methods of control group. Chiropractic included local muscle loosening, attacking point, bilateral pulling atlanto-axial joint, and continuous treatment for 10 days. The pure-tone audiometry score and NPQ score were compared between two groups after treatment.

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Deafness and Chiropractic Page

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Cross-Sectional Analysis of Telomere Length in People 33-80 Years of Age: Effects of Dietary Supplementation

Cross-Sectional Analysis of Telomere Length in People 33-80 Years of Age: Effects of Dietary Supplementation

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Poster Presentation at the American College of Nutrition’s
55th Annual Conference


Calvin B. Harley, PhD (1); Joanne Chan, BS (1);
Marsha Blauwkamp, PhD (1); Francis C. Lau, PhD, FACN (2);
Jamie F. McManus, MD, FAAFP (2); Drew Watson, PhD (1);
Evangelos Hytopoulos, PhD (1); and
Bruce P. Daggy, PhD, FACN (2)

(1)   Telomere Diagnostics Inc., Menlo Park, CA;
(2)   Shaklee Research Center, Pleasanton, CA.


Abstract

Telomere length has been associated with aging, age-related diseases, adverse conditions, and mortality. Moreover, studies in humans suggest a causal role of short telomeres or accelerated telomere shortening in disease and mortality risk. A previous cross-sectional study has shown that Shaklee supplement usage significantly improved various health parameters and nutritional status. [1] The objective of the current cross-sectional study was to explore the effect of dietary supplementation on telomere length.

The normal range of telomere lengths was determined from saliva samples in a population of healthy, non-smoking subjects aged 33-80 from the San Francisco Bay Area (control group; n=324; 147 males and 177 females) who took no more than 3 supplements daily. The telomere lengths of heavy supplement users (supplement group; n=80; 21 males and 59 females), the majority of whom took more than 12 Shaklee supplements at least 4 days per week, were compared to the age-matched control group. Disease and smoking status were not exclusion criteria for the supplement group. Telomere length was measured by quantitative PCR to determine the telomere-to-single copy gene (T/S) ratio. Change in T/S ratio over time was fitted to a linear regression. Blood biomarkers were also assessed.

Overall, women had longer telomeres than men in the control group, but this trend was reversed in the supplement group. (Refer to Figures 3 & 4 below) T/S ratio of the supplement group was 11.2% greater than that of the control group (p<0.0001). Supplementation resulted in a greater treatment effect in men vs. women (p<0.005). By linear regression, the rate of change in T/S ratio was reduced by 40% in the supplement group vs control. Blood biomarkers in both groups were comparable and were within the normal physiological ranges.

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All About Telomeres Page

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