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Frank M. Painter

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About Frank M. Painter

I was introduced to Chiro.Org in early 1996, where my friend Joe Garolis helped me learn HTML, the "mark-up language" for websites. We have been fortunate that journals like JMPT have given us permission to reproduce some early important articles in Full-Text format. Maintaining the Org website has been, and remains, my favorite hobby.

Nontraditional Therapies (Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine and Chiropractic) in Exotic Animals

By |April 22, 2018|Acupuncture, Chiropractic Care|

Nontraditional Therapies (Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine and Chiropractic) in Exotic Animals

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract. 2018 (May); 21 (2): 511–528

Jessica A. Marziani, DVM, CVA, CVC, CCRT

CARE Veterinary Services PLLC,
PO Box 132082, Houston, TX 77219, USA


The nontraditional therapies of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine and chiropractic care are adjunct treatments that can be used in conjunction with more conventional therapies to treat a variety of medical conditions. Nontraditional therapies do not need to be alternatives to Western medicine but, instead, can be used simultaneously. Exotic animal practitioners should have a basic understanding of nontraditional therapies for both client education and patient referral because they can enhance the quality of life, longevity, and positive outcomes for various cases across multiple taxa.

Keywords:   Acupuncture; Alternative therapies; Chiropractic; Complementary therapies; Integrative therapies; Nontraditional therapies; Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine


From the FULL TEXT Article:

KEY POINTS

  • Nontraditional therapies can be used in conjunction with conventional Western therapies to enhance patient outcome.

  • Nontraditional therapies are often sought out by exotic pet owners; therefore,
    overall understanding is important for general practitioners.

  • Exotic animal species can benefit from the application of nontraditional therapies.

  • Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine is tailored to the individual patient
    to optimize health.

  • Chiropractic care can be used as preventative form of treatment and for
    chronic conditions.


INTRODUCTION

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Dean Smith, D.C., PhD Becomes the 2018 ACA Researcher of the Year

By |April 21, 2018|Announcement|

Dean Smith, D.C., PhD Becomnes the 2018 ACA Researcher of the Year

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Miami University Apr 18, 2018

James M. Loy, Miami University



ACA Researcher of the Year Explores Chiropractic’s Untapped Potential

As with all health professions, there are still many mysteries surrounding chiropractic care. Even though the practice is growing, the extent of its effects and applications are not yet well known.

However, research and awareness continue to expand. And the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) has recently honored Dean Smith, Miami University senior clinical faculty member, for his contributions with the 2018 George B. McClelland Researcher of the Year Award.

Upon receiving the news, “I was in disbelief,” Smith says. “Because when I look at the list of previous winners, they are the stars of our profession. So I couldn’t believe anybody would think of me in that kind of category. This definitely surpasses anything I could even dream about.”

As an exercise science specialist in Miami’s College of Education, Health and Society, Smith explores the intersections of chiropractic treatment, exercise, and human performance. His work also studies how various adjustments can affect speed, accuracy, and postural control, as well as the overall quality of movement.

More recently, Smith and his colleagues completed a lengthy study funded by the U.S. Department of Defense. By working with special operation forces, they examined how chiropractic can impact the response rates of both simple and complicated movements.

“We had them do 100 button presses and we looked at how fast they could do them before and after a series of treatments,” says Smith. “And the results essentially showed that that particular task really seemed to show the effect. People got faster.”

His additional projects have demonstrated that as little as 30 minutes of exercise can also improve movement time, and that lower body joint adjustments can improve the balance of healthy young adults.

And alongside his research, Smith also founded and hosts a podcast called Chiropractic Science, which brings together leading researchers and professionals to discuss current trends and new findings.

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The Provision of Chiropractic, Physiotherapy and Osteopathic Services Within the Australian Private Health-care System

By |April 20, 2018|Chiropractic Care|

The Provision of Chiropractic, Physiotherapy and Osteopathic Services Within the Australian Private Health-care System: A Report of Recent Trends

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2014 (Jan 15); 22 (1): 3

Roger M Engel, Benjamin T Brown, Michael S Swain, and Reidar P Lystad

Department of Chiropractic,
Macquarie University,
Balaclava Rd, North Ryde 2109,
Australia.


BACKGROUND:   Chiropractors, physiotherapists, and osteopaths receive training in the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal conditions. As a result there is considerable overlap in the types of conditions that are encountered clinically by these practitioners. In Australia, the majority of benefits paid for these services come from the private sector. The purpose of this article is to quantify and describe the development in service utilization and the cost of benefits paid to users of these healthcare services by private health insurers. An exploration of the factors that may have influenced the observed trends is also presented.

METHODS:   A review of data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency, and the Australian Government Private Health Insurance Administration Council was conducted. An analysis of chiropractic, physiotherapy and osteopathic service utilisation and cost of service utilisation trend was performed along with the level of benefits and services over time.

RESULTS:   In 2012, the number of physiotherapists working in the private sector was 2.9 times larger than that of chiropractic, and 7.8 times that of the osteopathic profession. The total number of services provided by chiropractors, physiotherapists, and osteopaths increased steadily over the past 15 years. For the majority of this period, chiropractors provided more services than the other two professions. The average number of services provided by chiropractors was approximately two and a half times that of physiotherapists and four and a half times that of osteopaths.

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Patients’ Experiences and Expectations of Chiropractic Care

By |April 19, 2018|Patient Expectations|

Patients’ Experiences and Expectations of Chiropractic Care:
A National Cross-sectional Survey

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2015 (Jan 16); 23 (1): 3

Hugh MacPherson, Elizabeth Newbronner, Ruth Chamberlain and Ann Hopton

Department of Health Sciences,
University of York,
York, UK.


BACKGROUND:   Not enough is understood about patients’ views of chiropractic care. The aims of this research were to explore patients’ experiences and expectations, their perceptions of benefits and risks, and the implications for chiropractors’ continuing fitness to practise.

METHODS:   Survey questions were formulated from existing literature, published guidance on good practice from the General Chiropractic Council, and from 28 telephone interviews and a small focus group with chiropractic patients using a semi-structured topic guide. In its final form, the survey elicited patients’ ratings on expectations regarding 33 aspects of care. In a national cross-sectional survey, a number of sampling methods were required as a consequence of the low practitioner response rate.

RESULTS:   In total, 544 completed questionnaires were received from chiropractic patients, a lower response rate than expected (8%). The two main benefits that patients reported regarding their chiropractic care were reduced pain (92%) and increased mobility (80%). Of respondents, 20% reported unexpected or unpleasant reactions to their treatment, most commonly tiredness or fatigue (32%), and extra pain (36%). In most cases they expressed low levels of concern about these reactions. Patients’ expectations were met for most aspects of care. The four aspects of practice where expectations were least well met comprised: having more information on the cost of the treatment plan at the first consultation (80%); the chiropractor contacting the patient’s general practitioner if necessary (62%); having a discussion about a referral to another healthcare practitioner (62%); and providing a method for confidential feedback (66%).

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The Chiropractic Profession: A Scoping Review of Utilization Rates, Reasons for Seeking Care, Patient Profiles, and Care Provided

By |April 18, 2018|Chiropractic Care|

The Chiropractic Profession: A Scoping Review of Utilization Rates, Reasons for Seeking Care, Patient Profiles, and Care Provided

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2017 (Nov 22);   25:   35

Peter J. H. Beliveau, Jessica J. Wong, Deborah A. Sutton, Nir Ben Simon, André E. Bussières, Silvano A. Mior and Simon D. French

Department of Public Health Sciences,
Queen’s University,
Kingston, Canada.


BACKGROUND:   Previous research has investigated utilization rates, who sees chiropractors, for what reasons, and the type of care that chiropractors provide. However, these studies have not been comprehensively synthesized. We aimed to give a global overview by summarizing the current literature on the utilization of chiropractic services, reasons for seeking care, patient profiles, and assessment and treatment provided.

METHODS:   Systematic searches were conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Index to Chiropractic Literature using keywords and subject headings (MeSH or ChiroSH terms) from database inception to January 2016. Eligible studies: 1) were published in English or French; 2) were case series, descriptive, cross-sectional, or cohort studies; 3) described patients receiving chiropractic services; and 4) reported on the following theme(s): utilization rates of chiropractic services; reasons for attending chiropractic care; profiles of chiropractic patients; or, types of chiropractic services provided. Paired reviewers independently screened all citations and data were extracted from eligible studies. We provided descriptive numerical analysis, e.g. identifying the median rate and interquartile range (e.g., chiropractic utilization rate) stratified by study population or condition.

RESULTS:   The literature search retrieved 14,149 articles; 328 studies (reported in 337 articles) were relevant and reported on chiropractic utilization (245 studies), reason for attending chiropractic care (85 studies), patient demographics (130 studies), and assessment and treatment provided (34 studies). Globally, the median 12-month utilization of chiropractic services was 9.1% (interquartile range (IQR): 6.7%-13.1%) and remained stable between 1980 and 2015. Most patients consulting chiropractors were female (57.0%, IQR: 53.2%-60.0%) with a median age of 43.4 years (IQR: 39.6-48.0), and were employed (median: 77.3%, IQR: 70.3%-85.0%). The most common reported reasons for people attending chiropractic care were (median) low back pain (49.7%, IQR: 43.0%-60.2%), neck pain (22.5%, IQR: 16.3%-24.5%), and extremity problems (10.0%, IQR: 4.3%-22.0%). The most common treatment provided by chiropractors included (median) spinal manipulation (79.3%, IQR: 55.4%-91.3%), soft-tissue therapy (35.1%, IQR: 16.5%-52.0%), and formal patient education (31.3%, IQR: 22.6%-65.0%).

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Validity and Reliability of Clinical Prediction Rules used to Screen for Cervical Spine Injury in Alert Low-risk Patients with Blunt Trauma to the Neck

By |April 17, 2018|Cervical Spine Trauma|

Validity and Reliability of Clinical Prediction Rules used to Screen for Cervical Spine Injury in Alert Low-risk Patients with Blunt Trauma to the Neck: Part 2. A Systematic Review from the Cervical Assessment and Diagnosis Research Evaluation (CADRE) Collaboration

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SOURCE:   European Spine Journal 2017 (Sep 22) [Epub]

N. Moser, N. Lemeunier, D. Southerst, H. Shearer, K. Murnaghan, D. Sutton, P. Cote

Division of Graduate Education and Research,
Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC),
6100 Leslie Street,
Toronto, ON, Canada.


PURPOSE: To update findings of the 2000-2010 Bone and Joint Decade Task Force on Neck Pain and its Associated Disorders (Neck Pain Task Force) on the validity and reliability of clinical prediction rules used to screen for cervical spine injury in alert low-risk adult patients with blunt trauma to the neck.

METHODS: We searched four databases from 2005 to 2015. Pairs of independent reviewers critically appraised eligible studies using the modified QUADAS-2 and QAREL criteria. We synthesized low risk of bias studies following best evidence synthesis principles.

RESULTS: We screened 679 citations; five had a low risk of bias and were included in our synthesis. The sensitivity of the Canadian C-spine rule ranged from 0.90 to 1.00 with negative predictive values ranging from 99 to 100%. Inter-rater reliability of the Canadian C-spine rule varied from k = 0.60 between nurses and physicians to k = 0.93 among paramedics. The inter-rater reliability of the Nexus Low-Risk Criteria was k = 0.53 between resident physicians and faculty physicians.

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