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John Wiens DC

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About John Wiens DC

Dr Wiens created the very first chiropractic information page on the web in Nov 1994. In 1995 he joined chiro.org as chief designer. He lives in Canada.

Chiropractic Science – Podcast interview with Scott Haldeman

By |February 9, 2018|Podcast|

Source Chiropractic Science

Dr. Haldeman is a pioneer of chiropractic science and a world leader in spine research. Dr. Haldeman holds the positions of Adjunct Professor, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, and Clinical Professor, Department of Neurology, University of California, Irvine.

He is Past President of the North American Spine Society, the American Back Society, the North American Academy of Manipulative Therapy, and the Orange County Neurological Society, and is currently Chairman Emeritus of the Research Council of the World Federation of Chiropractic. He is certified by the American Board of Neurology and Psychiatry and is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada and a Fellow of the American Academy of Neurology. He is a Diplomat of the American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine, the American Board of Electroencephalography and Neurophysiology and the American Board of Clinical Physiology. He also served on the US department of Health AHCPR Clinical Guidelines Committee on Acute Low Back Problems in Adults as well as four other Clinical Guidelines Committees. He presided over The Bone and Joint Decade 2000 to 2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders.

You can find the podcast here.

He also happens to be the uncle of innovator Elon Musk.

JFK’s assassination aided by his bad back, records show

By |November 22, 2017|back pain|

Source CNN

Every November the United States remembers Camelot: a shining time of promise led by John F. Kennedy, the nation’s youngest president brought to an abrupt and bloody end on this day in 1963. While conspiracy theorists debate who pulled the trigger, there’s another culprit that often goes unmentioned: Kennedy’s lifelong struggle with back pain.

It was his habit of wearing a tightly laced back brace that may have kept him from recoiling to the floor of his car after the assassin’s first bullet struck him in the neck.

“The brace was a firmly bound corset, around his hips and lower back and higher up,” said Dr. Thomas Pait, a spinal neurosurgeon who co-authored a paper about Kennedy’s failed back surgeries and other treatments such as manipulation under anesthesia.  “He tightly laced it and put a wide Ace bandage around in a figure eight around his trunk. If you think about it, if you have that brace all the way up your chest, above your nipples, and real tight, are you going to be able to bend forward?”

Read more on the CNN website.

Elon Musk’s chiropractic connection

By |May 16, 2017|History, Uncategorized|

Source Regina Leader-Post

Dr. Scott Haldeman is a board certified Neurologist in active clinical practice in Santa Ana, California. He currently is a distinguished Professor at the University of California, the Chairman of the Research Council for the World Federation of Chiropractic and the Founder/President of World Spine Care.

 

Accomplished in his own right, he also happens to be the uncle of one of the worlds great innovators, Elon Musk. Read how the young Musk spent time on the Haldeman family farm in Saskatchewan. Both Scott’s father and his grandmother (Musk’s great-grandmother) were chiropractors. In fact, Almeda Haldeman became Canada’s first known chiropractor in the early 1900’s.

You can read the rest of the story here.

Information on the Haldeman’s and other chiropractic pioneers can be found in Dr J.C. Keating’s notes in our Chiropractic History section.

Australian study indicates common painkillers ineffective for back pain

By |February 7, 2017|NSAIDs|

Commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs used to treat back pain provide little benefit and may make things worse according to new research from The George Institute for Global Health.

The findings of the systematic review, published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, reveal only one in six patients treated with the pills, also known as NSAIDs, achieve any significant reduction in pain.

The study is the latest work from The George Institute questioning the effectiveness of existing medicines for treating back pain. Earlier research has already demonstrated paracetamol does not speed recovery or reduce pain for acute low back pain, and opioids provide minimal benefit over placebo.

Lead author Associate Professor Manuela Ferreira says the study highlights an urgent need to develop new therapies to treat back pain which affects 80 per cent of Australians during their lifetime.

A/Prof Ferreira, Senior Research Fellow at The George Institute and at the Institute of Bone and Joint Research, said: “Back pain is the leading cause of disability worldwide and is commonly managed by prescribing medicines such as anti-inflammatories. But our results show anti-inflammatory drugs actually only provide very limited short term pain relief. They do reduce the level of pain, but only very slightly, and arguably not of any clinical significance.”

A/Prof Ferreira added: “When you factor in the side effects which are very common, it becomes clear that these drugs are not the answer to providing pain relief to the many millions of Australians who suffer from this debilitating condition every year.”

The team at The George Institute, which examined 35 trials involving more than 6000 people, also found patients taking anti-inflammatories were 2.5 times more likely to suffer from gastro-intestinal problems such as stomach ulcers and bleeding.

Research Fellow Gustavo Machado, of The George Institute and the School of Medicine at the University of Sydney, said: “Millions of Australians are taking drugs that not only don’t work very well, they’re causing harm. We need treatments that will actually provide substantial relief of these people’s symptoms.

“Better still we need a stronger focus on preventing back pain in the first place. We know that education and exercise programs can substantially reduce the risk of developing low back pain.”

Most clinical guidelines currently recommend NSAIDs as the second line analgesics after paracetamol, with opioids coming at third choice.

 

An Inspiring Story

By |April 1, 2016|Video|

This powerful video shows the story of a young man whose life was dramatically altered by a relatively short course of properly applied chiropractic treatment. In the spirit of sharing, this video appears to have been produced to demonstrate chiropractic technique rather than as a vehicle for self-promotion.

“Find it, fix it, and leave it alone”

Unfortunately, this video has been removed by the author.

 

A Giant in Chiropractic Radiology: Remembering Dr. Lindsay Rowe (1956-2016)

By |March 23, 2016|News|

Source Dynamic Chiropractic

By Deborah Pate, DC, DACBR

Lindsay Rowe, DC, MD, DACBR, was a giant in the field of chiropractic radiology who enjoyed careers as a chiropractor, medical doctor, radiologist and educator.

A distinguished international lecturer and author, he wrote more than 50 scientific papers and numerous book chapters; and together with Dr. Terry Yochum, co-authored the internationally respected text Essentials of Skeletal Radiology, now in its third edition. It is the standard text in most chiropractic colleges and has been enthusiastically reviewed in scientific journals such as The New England Journal of Medicine and Radiology.

Dr. Rowe earned his chiropractic degree (MAppSc – Chiropractic) with honors from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Australia. He subsequently practiced chiropractic and later earned board certification in chiropractic radiology at a time when few chiropractors entered into the specialty. He chaired the Department of Radiology at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College in Toronto, Ontario. Later, he held the same position at Northwestern College of Chiropractic in Minneapolis, Minn.

Dr. Rowe received a medical degree from the University of Newcastle, Australia, followed by residencies in emergency medicine and diagnostic and interventional radiology at the same institution. He was associate professor at the University of Newcastle, an adjunct professor at Northwestern Health Sciences University and Murdoch University, staff radiologist at the Center for Diagnostic Imaging (a national medical imaging network) and John Hunter Hospital in Melbourne. He was also a prolific presenter at professional meetings in Australia and many countries around the world.

Dr. Rowe’s accomplishments in skeletal radiology have contributed much to the advancement of chiropractic’s acceptance in the medical community, especially chiropractic radiology. He was a leader and a trailblazer, bridging the gap between allopathic and chiropractic; creating respect for our profession within the modern health care community.