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John Wiens DC

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About John Wiens DC

Dr Wiens created the very first chiropractic information page on the web in Nov 1994. In 1995 he joined chiro.org as chief designer. He lives in Canada.

A Giant in Chiropractic Radiology: Remembering Dr. Lindsay Rowe (1956-2016)

By |March 23, 2016|News|

Source Dynamic Chiropractic

By Deborah Pate, DC, DACBR

Lindsay Rowe, DC, MD, DACBR, was a giant in the field of chiropractic radiology who enjoyed careers as a chiropractor, medical doctor, radiologist and educator.

A distinguished international lecturer and author, he wrote more than 50 scientific papers and numerous book chapters; and together with Dr. Terry Yochum, co-authored the internationally respected text Essentials of Skeletal Radiology, now in its third edition. It is the standard text in most chiropractic colleges and has been enthusiastically reviewed in scientific journals such as The New England Journal of Medicine and Radiology.

Dr. Rowe earned his chiropractic degree (MAppSc – Chiropractic) with honors from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Australia. He subsequently practiced chiropractic and later earned board certification in chiropractic radiology at a time when few chiropractors entered into the specialty. He chaired the Department of Radiology at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College in Toronto, Ontario. Later, he held the same position at Northwestern College of Chiropractic in Minneapolis, Minn.

Dr. Rowe received a medical degree from the University of Newcastle, Australia, followed by residencies in emergency medicine and diagnostic and interventional radiology at the same institution. He was associate professor at the University of Newcastle, an adjunct professor at Northwestern Health Sciences University and Murdoch University, staff radiologist at the Center for Diagnostic Imaging (a national medical imaging network) and John Hunter Hospital in Melbourne. He was also a prolific presenter at professional meetings in Australia and many countries around the world.

Dr. Rowe’s accomplishments in skeletal radiology have contributed much to the advancement of chiropractic’s acceptance in the medical community, especially chiropractic radiology. He was a leader and a trailblazer, bridging the gap between allopathic and chiropractic; creating respect for our profession within the modern health care community.

Flu Vaccine for All: A Critical Look at the Evidence

By |December 30, 2015|Vaccination|

Flu Vaccine for All:
A Critical Look at the Evidence

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Medscape
NOTE: you need to create a free account to view this source


Question

Does the evidence support the call for universal influenza vaccination?

Response from Eric A. Biondi, MD, MS
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Pediatric Hospitalist, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York
Response from C. Andrew Aligne, MD, MPH
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Director of The Hoekelman Center, University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry, Rochester, New York

Influenza vaccination is a yearly ritual. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommend annual influenza vaccination for all healthy persons 6 months of age or older who are without contraindications.

In an interview published in The Atlantic, Tom Jefferson, head of the Vaccine Field Group at the Cochrane Database Collaboration (the world’s leading producer of evidence-based medical reviews), voiced serious reservations about the data supporting influenza vaccine recommendations, stating that “The vast majority of the studies [are] deeply flawed. Rubbish is not a scientific term, but I think it’s the term that applies.”

A critical look at the evidence raises further questions about the flu shot recommendations. A 2012 Cochrane review examining the efficacy of pediatric influenza vaccination noted that:

…industry-funded studies were published in more prestigious journals and cited more than other studies, independent of methodological quality and size. Studies funded from public sources were significantly less likely to report conclusions favorable to [influenza] vaccines… reliable evidence on influenza vaccines is thin but there is evidence of widespread manipulation of conclusions and spurious notoriety of the studies.

And a 2014 Cochrane review examining use of flu vaccine in healthy adults, including pregnant women, concluded that:

[Influenza] vaccination shows no appreciable effect on working days lost or hospitalization.

Read about the virology of influenza and it’s relationship with vitamin D.
(more…)

Concussion study: UBC’s Thunderbirds use their heads to advance science

By |November 27, 2015|Concussion|

Source CBC News

Canadian Chiropractic Research Foundation funds concussion study at the University of British Columbia.

UBC football players are helping advance the science around concussions — using their own heads.

When the Thunderbirds take to the field for the national semi-finals today a number of them will be wearing head sensors that take measurements to help researchers unravel the impact of concussions on athletes.

“What we’re trying to do is get a little more info on what’s occurring in head trauma and football,” said Harrison Brown, a PhD candidate at UBC in Kinesiology.

The study is also uncovering patterns or trends, such as,  “the differences between positions, practices and games, for example,” Brown said.

More than a dozen players, including the starting quarterback and starting running back, volunteered for the study, funded by the Canadian Chiropractic Research Foundation.

Brown said sensors called “xPatches” — an impact sensing patch — are put behind the players’ ears and worn during practices and games.

Researchers study the number, and the intensity, of hits players take, as well as the effects.

So, while the UBC Thunderbirds take on St. Francis Xavier’s X-men in the hopes of advancing to the Vanier Cup, they will advance science no matter what the final score of the game.

The results of the 2-year study are expected next spring.

Natural anti-inflammatory agents for pain relief

By |November 24, 2015|Pain Relief|

Source US National Library of Medicine

Abstract

The use of both over-the-counter and prescription nonsteroidal medications is frequently recommended in a typical neurosurgical practice. But persistent long-term use safety concerns must be considered when prescribing these medications for chronic and degenerative pain conditions. This article is a literature review of the biochemical pathways of inflammatory pain, the potentially serious side effects of nonsteroidal drugs and commonly used and clinically studied natural alternative anti-inflammatory supplements. Although nonsteroidal medications can be effective, herbs and dietary supplements may offer a safer, and often an effective, alternative treatment for pain relief, especially for long-term use.

Read the full article…

 

Chronicles of Health Creation: RAND Report Begs New Look at Integrative Medicine and Health Professionals in the Triple Aim Era

By |November 20, 2015|Complementary and Alternative Medicine|

Excerpted from Huffington Post
John Weeks

A recent report from the RAND Corporation describes how regular medicine reduced complementary and alternative medicine professionals to “thing” status — as “modalities” — in the first years of the integrative medicine era.

The title of the report is “Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Professions or Modalities?” The discussions among policy makers, practitioners and delivery system leaders synthesized in the 75-page document beg a more significant question: Does the emergence of values-based medicine urge a major re-think regarding the potential contributions of these professionals?

The case statement by RAND’s Patricia Herman, ND, PhD and Ian Coulter, PhD begins with a blunt irony. “One of the hallmarks of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is treatment of the whole person.” Yet in the fee-for-service procedure and production orientation of the medical industry, licensed practitioners of chiropractic, acupuncture and Oriental medicine, and naturopathic medicine were typically stripped of this core value — treating the whole person — before being put to any use.

Regular medicine’s dominant influence when “CAM” integration by medical delivery organizations began in the mid-1990s was the industrial value of service production. Mayo Clinic’s director of innovation captures this concisely when he recently spoke of medicine’s historic focus on “producing” services rather than on “creating health.”

In such an industrial setting, a chiropractor became a thing to be use sparingly. Chiropractor = spinal manipulation for low back pain.

A precedent for this boiling down of a chiropractor’s potential value in human health to thing status was set for chiropractors decades earlier in Medicare. In that even more intransigent fee-for-service era, only adjustment of the spine for low back pain made the grade. Unremunerated was the time that a chiropractor spends in evaluation and management. Most of the chiropractic professional’s education and practice rights were dumped overboard. No value was placed on a chiropractor’s counseling of patients on diet, lifestyle, dietary supplements, or ergonomics, for instance.

Getting into Medicare at all back then was a victory for the field. But a consequence of this limited economic relationship was the rack ’em and crack ’em – as fast as possible method of treatment. Produce!