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Nontraditional Therapies (Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine and Chiropractic) in Exotic Animals

By |April 22, 2018|Acupuncture, Chiropractic Care|

Nontraditional Therapies (Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine and Chiropractic) in Exotic Animals

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract. 2018 (May); 21 (2): 511–528

Jessica A. Marziani, DVM, CVA, CVC, CCRT

CARE Veterinary Services PLLC,
PO Box 132082, Houston, TX 77219, USA


The nontraditional therapies of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine and chiropractic care are adjunct treatments that can be used in conjunction with more conventional therapies to treat a variety of medical conditions. Nontraditional therapies do not need to be alternatives to Western medicine but, instead, can be used simultaneously. Exotic animal practitioners should have a basic understanding of nontraditional therapies for both client education and patient referral because they can enhance the quality of life, longevity, and positive outcomes for various cases across multiple taxa.

Keywords:   Acupuncture; Alternative therapies; Chiropractic; Complementary therapies; Integrative therapies; Nontraditional therapies; Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine


From the FULL TEXT Article:

KEY POINTS

  • Nontraditional therapies can be used in conjunction with conventional Western therapies to enhance patient outcome.

  • Nontraditional therapies are often sought out by exotic pet owners; therefore,
    overall understanding is important for general practitioners.

  • Exotic animal species can benefit from the application of nontraditional therapies.

  • Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine is tailored to the individual patient
    to optimize health.

  • Chiropractic care can be used as preventative form of treatment and for
    chronic conditions.


INTRODUCTION

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Provider and Patient Perspectives on Opioids and Alternative Treatments for Managing Chronic Pain

By |April 15, 2017|Acupuncture, Complementary and Alternative Medicine|

Provider and Patient Perspectives on Opioids and Alternative Treatments for Managing Chronic Pain:
A Qualitative Study

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   BMC Fam Pract. 2017 (Mar 24); 17 (1): 164

Lauren S. Penney, Cheryl Ritenbaugh, Lynn L. DeBar,
Charles Elder and Richard A. Deyo

South Texas Veterans Health Care System,
7400 Merton Minter Blvd,
San Antonio, TX, 78229, USA


BACKGROUND:   Current literature describes the limits and pitfalls of using opioid pharmacotherapy for chronic pain and the importance of identifying alternatives. The objective of this study was to identify the practical issues patients and providers face when accessing alternatives to opioids, and how multiple parties view these issues.

METHODS:   Qualitative data were gathered to evaluate the outcomes of acupuncture and chiropractic (A/C) services for chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) using structured interview guides among patients with CMP (n = 90) and primary care (medical) providers (PCPs) (n = 25) purposively sampled from a managed care health care system as well as from contracted community A/C providers (n = 14). Focus groups and interviews were conducted patients with CMP with varying histories of A/C use. Plan PCPs and contracted A/C providers took part in individual interviews. All participants were asked about their experiences managing chronic pain and experience with and/or attitudes about A/C treatment. Audio recordings were transcribed and thematically coded. A summarized version of the focus group/interview guides is included in the Additional file 1.

RESULTS:   We identified four themes around opioid use:

(1)   attitudes toward use of opioids to manage chronic pain;
(2)   the limited alternative options for chronic pain management;
(3)   the potential of A/C care as a tool to help manage pain; and
(4)   the complex system around chronic pain management.

Despite widespread dissatisfaction with opioid medications for pain management, many practical barriers challenged access to other options. Most of the participants’ perceived acupuncture and chiropractic (A/C) care as helpful for short term pain relief. We identified that problems with timing, expectations, and plan coverage limited A/C care potential for pain relief treatment.

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Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Symptoms in a 31-Year-Old Woman Using Cervical Manipulation and Acupuncture

By |September 13, 2016|Acupuncture|

Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Symptoms in a 31-Year-Old Woman Using Cervical Manipulation and Acupuncture: A Case Report

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Chiropractic Medicine 2015 (Sep); 14 (3): 220–224

Danielle M. Gergen, DC

Oxboro Family Chiropractic,
Bloomington, MN.


OBJECTIVE:   The objective was to describe chiropractic and acupuncture care of a patient with acute mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) symptoms.

CLINICAL FEATURES:   A 31-year-old woman had acute neck pain, headache, dizziness, nausea, tinnitus, difficulty concentrating, and fatigue following a fall. She was diagnosed at an urgent care facility with mTBI immediately following the fall. Pharmaceutical intervention had been ineffective for her symptoms.

INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME:   The patient was treated with chiropractic adjustments characterized as high velocity, low amplitude thrusts directed to the cervical spine and local acupuncture points in the cervical and cranial regions. The patient received care for a total of 8 visits over 2.5 weeks with resolution of concussive symptoms.

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Acupuncture and Chiropractic Care Utilization

By |November 9, 2015|Acupuncture, Chiropractic Care|

Acupuncture and Chiropractic Care: Utilization and Electronic Medical Record Capture

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Am J Manag Care. 2015 (Jul 1); 21 (7): e414-21 ~ FULL TEXT

Charles Elder, MD, MPH; Lynn DeBar, PhD, MPH;
Cheryl Ritenbaugh, PhD, MPH; et. al

Kaiser Permanente Northwest,
Center for Health Research,
3800 N Interstate Ave,
Portland, OR 97227
Charles.Elder@kpchr.org


This recent study, published in the American Journal of Managed Care, underscores why so many chiropractic patients have to go “out of network” in order to get the care they need: Managed care appears to be be effectively locking them out. This study reviews chiropractic and acupuncture utilization by adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain at Kaiser Permanente Northwest, an HMO.

Evidently, physician referral for acupuncture is strictly limited to chronic pain complaints, while referral for chiropractic benefits is limited to acute pain. This is why 43-54% of those individuals who sought chiropractic care had to seek “out-of-plan” (aka out-of-pocket) care.

Physician referrals within this Kaiser program was tipped in favor of acupuncture, with 55% of them being referred for care, versus only 9% of the chiropractic patients.

Thanks to Dynamic Chiropractic for their brief review of this study!

OBJECTIVES:   To describe acupuncture and chiropractic use among patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) at a health maintenance organization, and explore issues of benefit design and electronic medical record (EMR) capture.

STUDY DESIGN:   Cross-sectional survey.

METHODS:   Kaiser Permanente members meeting EMR diagnostic criteria for CMP were invited to participate. The survey included questions about self-identified presence of chronic musculoskeletal pain, use of acupuncture and chiropractic care, use of ancillary self-care modalities, and communication with conventional medicine practitioners. Analysis of survey data was supplemented with a retrospective review of EMR utilization data.

RESULTS:   Of 6068 survey respondents, 32% reported acupuncture use, 47% reported chiropractic use, 21% used both, and 42% used neither. For 25% of patients using acupuncture and 43% of those using chiropractic care, utilization was undetected by the EMR. Thirty-five percent of acupuncture users and 42% of chiropractic users did not discuss this care with their health maintenance organization (HMO) clinicians. Among chiropractic users, those accessing care out of plan were older (P < .01), were more likely to use long-term opioids (P = .03), and had more pain diagnoses (P = .01) than those accessing care via clinician referral or self-referral. For acupuncture, those using the clinician referral mechanism exhibited these same characteristics.

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Acupuncture and Chiropractic Care for Chronic Painin an Integrated Health Plan: A Mixed Methods Study

By |December 9, 2011|Acupuncture, Research, Spinal Manipulation|

Acupuncture and Chiropractic Care for Chronic Pain
in an Integrated Health Plan: A Mixed Methods Study

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   BMC Complement Altern Med. 2011 (Nov 25); 11 (1): 118

DeBar LL, Elder C, Ritenbaugh C, Aickin M, Deyo R, Meenan R, Dickerson J, Webster JA, Jo Yarborough B.

Kaiser Permanente, The Center for Health Research, Portland, Oregon, USA. lynn.debar@kpchr.org


BACKGROUND: Substantial recent research examines the efficacy of many types of complementary and alternative (CAM) therapies. However, outcomes associated with the “real-world” use of CAM has been largely overlooked, despite calls for CAM therapies to be studied in the manner in which they are practiced. Americans seek CAM treatments far more often for chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) than for any other condition. Among CAM treatments for CMP, acupuncture and chiropractic (A/C) care are among those with the highest acceptance by physician groups and the best evidence to support their use. Further, recent alarming increases in delivery of opioid treatment and surgical interventions for chronic pain–despite their high costs, potential adverse effects, and modest efficacy–suggests the need to evaluate real world outcomes associated with promising non-pharmacological/non-surgical CAM treatments for CMP, which are often well accepted by patients and increasingly used in the community. (more…)

Commonly Used Meridian Points

By |June 20, 2010|Acupuncture, Diagnosis, Education, Meridian Points|

Commonly Used Meridian Points

The Chiro.Org Blog


We would all like to thank Dr. Richard C. Schafer, DC, PhD, FICC for his lifetime commitment to the profession. In the future we will continue to add materials from RC’s copyrighted books for your use.

This is Chapter 3 from RC’s best-selling book:

“Applied Physiotherapy in Chiropractic”

These materials are provided as a service to our profession. There is no charge for individuals to copy and file these materials. However, they cannot be sold or used in any group or commercial venture without written permission from ACAPress.


Chapter 3:   Commonly Used Meridian Points

This chapter delineates a few of the many theories attempting to explain the mechanisms of acupuncture point (acupoint) stimulation and meridian therapy. Stimulation of specific points on the body as a mechanism for pain control has achieved great interest in this country in recent years. The majority of studies center on stimulating endorphin production in the body. See Table 3.1. Antidotal and clinical evidence as well as patient records from Oriental cultures point to numerous cases where specific point stimulation has affected visceral and functional disease processes. In the context of physiologic therapeutics, the location, primary indications, and precautions associated with the major points (ie, those most commonly used) are reviewed.

Both Western and Eastern cultures developed systems for treating specific points on the body. It is hoped that future generations will be able to integrate the best of traditional Western and Oriental medicine into a single health-care delivery system for all people. [1]

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