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Agents of Change: How Do Complementary and Alternative Medicine Providers Play a Role in Health Behavior Change?

By |June 4, 2018|Alternative Medicine|

Agents of Change: How Do Complementary and Alternative Medicine Providers Play a Role in Health Behavior Change?

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Altern Ther Health Med. 2011 (Jan); 17 (1): 22–30

Pamela A. Williams-Piehota, PhD; Fuschia M. Sirois, PhD; Carla M. Bann, PhD; Karen B. Isenberg, MPH; Edith G. Walsh, PhD

RTI International,
Research Triangle Park,
North Carolina, USA.


BACKGROUND:   Recent investigations indicate that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use may be conducive to health behavior change.

OBJECTIVE:   The goal of this study was to investigate how this change occurs.

METHODS:   Using Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) and Self-determination Theory (SDT) as guiding frameworks, we surveyed a convenience sample of 216 CAM consumers abouttheir CAM therapy and iors and conducted focus groups with 36 CAM consumers.

RESULTS:   Consumers reported encouragement from providers and improved energy resulting from treatments as reasons for making health behavior changes. Multivariate analysis showed that increased odds of self-reported dietary change were significantly associated with increasing body awareness as a result of therapy, endorsing the statement that sustained improvement for their health conditions required self-care, using an acupuncturist, and being 44 years or younger. Comparable results were found for exercise change, except using an acupuncturist was a significant negative predictor and age was not significant. Focus group findings echoed these themes.

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The Manipulative Therapies: Osteopathy and Chiropractic

By |March 2, 2018|Alternative Medicine, Complementary Medicine|

The Manipulative Therapies: Osteopathy and Chiropractic

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   British Medical Journal 1999 (Oct 30); 319 (7218): 1176-1179

Andrew Vickers and Catherine Zollman


Osteopathy and chiropractic share a common origin. Their roots can be found in folk traditions of “bone setting,” and both were systematised in the late 19th century in the United States: Daniel D Palmer, the founder of chiropractic, is said to have met with Andrew Taylor Still, the founder of osteopathy, before setting up his own school. The therapies remain relatively similar, and many textbooks and journals are relevant to both. The term “manipulative therapy” refers to both osteopathy and chiropractic.


From the FULL TEXT Article:

Background

Osteopathy and chiropractic are therapies of the musculoskeletal system: practitioners work with bones, muscles, and connective tissue, using their hands to diagnose and treat abnormalities of structure and function.

The best known technique is the “high velocity thrust,” a short, sharp motion usually applied to the spine. This maneuver is designed to release structures with a restricted range of movement. High velocity thrusts often produce the sound of joint “cracking,” which is associated with manipulative therapy. There are various methods of delivering a high velocity thrust. Chiropractors are more likely to push on vertebrae with their hands, whereas osteopaths tend use the limbs to make levered thrusts. That said, osteopathic and chiropractic techniques are converging, and much of their therapeutic repertoire is shared.

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Alternative Medicine, Worker Health, and Absenteeism in the United States

By |June 25, 2017|Alternative Medicine, Complementary and Alternative Medicine|

Alternative Medicine, Worker Health,
and Absenteeism in the United States

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Complement Ther Med. 2017 (Jun); 32: 116–128

Kate Rybczynski

Department of Economics,
University of Waterloo,
200 University Avenue West,
Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada


Health related absenteeism costs an estimated $153 billion annually in the United States (Witters and Agrawal, 2011).   Chronic conditions (major contributors to absenteeism) are often successfully managed by Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM). As CAM becomes an increasingly visible component of healthcare, firms may wish to consider whether CAM therapies can help reduce illness-related absenteeism. This paper aims to extend the literature on healthcare utilization and absenteeism by exploring whether CAM treatment is associated with fewer workdays missed due to illness.

METHODS:   Using the 2007 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and propensity score matching (PSM), this study estimates the relationship between visits to CAM practitioners, health, and illness-related absenteeism.

RESULTS:   In a sample of 8,820 workers, the average annual number of workdays lost due to illness is 3.69. Visiting an acupuncturist correlates with lower absenteeism among men (1.182 fewer workdays missed, p<0.05), whereas visiting a naturopathic doctor correlates with 2.359 and 2.521 fewer workdays missed for women and men, respectively (both p<0.001). Active mind-body practices, massage, chiropractic and acupuncture treatments are all significantly associated with improved health.

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