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JFK’s assassination aided by his bad back, records show

By |November 22, 2017|back pain|

Source CNN

Every November the United States remembers Camelot: a shining time of promise led by John F. Kennedy, the nation’s youngest president brought to an abrupt and bloody end on this day in 1963. While conspiracy theorists debate who pulled the trigger, there’s another culprit that often goes unmentioned: Kennedy’s lifelong struggle with back pain.

It was his habit of wearing a tightly laced back brace that may have kept him from recoiling to the floor of his car after the assassin’s first bullet struck him in the neck.

“The brace was a firmly bound corset, around his hips and lower back and higher up,” said Dr. Thomas Pait, a spinal neurosurgeon who co-authored a paper about Kennedy’s failed back surgeries and other treatments such as manipulation under anesthesia.  “He tightly laced it and put a wide Ace bandage around in a figure eight around his trunk. If you think about it, if you have that brace all the way up your chest, above your nipples, and real tight, are you going to be able to bend forward?”

Read more on the CNN website.

High Prevalence of Daily and Multi-site pain — A Cross-sectional Population-based Study Among 3000 Danish Adolescents

By |July 19, 2015|back pain, Pediatrics|

High Prevalence of Daily and Multi-site pain — A Cross-sectional Population-based Study Among 3000 Danish Adolescents

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SOURCE:   BMC Pediatr. 2013 (Nov 19);   13:   191 ~ FULL TEXT

Michael S Rathleff, Ewa M Roos, Jens L Olesen, and Sten Rasmussen

HEALTH,
Aarhus University,
Vennelyst Boulevard 9,
8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.
misr@rn.dk


BACKGROUND:   Daily pain and multi-site pain are both associated with reduction in work ability and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among adults. However, no population-based studies have yet investigated the prevalence of daily and multi-site pain among adolescents and how these are associated with respondent characteristics. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported daily and multi-site pain among adolescents aged 12-19 years and associations of almost daily pain and multi-site pain with respondent characteristics (sex, age, body mass index, HRQoL and sports participation).

METHODS:   A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 4,007 adolescents aged 12-19 years in Denmark. Adolescents answered an online questionnaire during physical education lessons. The questionnaire contained a mannequin divided into 12 regions on which the respondents indicated their current pain sites and pain frequency (rarely, monthly, weekly, more than once per week, almost daily pain), characteristics, sports participation and HRQoL measured by the EuroQoL 5D. Multivariate regression was used to calculate the odds ratio for the association between almost daily pain, multi-site pain and respondent characteristics.

RESULTS:   The response rate was 73.7%. A total of 2,953 adolescents (62% females) answered the questionnaire. 33.3% reported multi-site pain (pain in > 1 region) while 19.8% reported almost daily pain. 61% reported current pain in at least one region with knee and back pain being the most common sites. Female sex (OR: 1.35-1.44) and a high level of sports participation (OR: 1.51-2.09) were associated with increased odds of having almost daily pain and multi-site pain. Better EQ-5D score was associated with decreased odds of having almost daily pain or multi-site pain (OR: 0.92-0.94).

CONCLUSION:   In this population-based cohort of school-attending Danish adolescents, nearly two out of three reported current pain and, on average, one out of three reported pain in more than one body region. Female sex, and high level of sports participation were associated with increased odds of having almost daily pain and multi-site pain. The study highlights an important health issue that calls for investigations to improve our understanding of adolescent pain and our capacity to prevent and treat this condition.


From the Full-Text Article:

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Is Back Pain During Childhood or Adolescence Associated with Muscle Strength, Muscle Endurance or Aerobic Capacity?

By |July 18, 2015|back pain, Pediatrics|

Is Back Pain During Childhood or Adolescence Associated with Muscle Strength, Muscle Endurance or Aerobic Capacity: Three Systematic Literature Reviews with one Meta-analysis

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SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2015 (Jul 16);   23:   21 ~ FULL TEXT

Arnaud Lardon, Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde, and
Christine Le Scanff

EA 4532 CIAMS,
Université Paris-Sud, UFR STAPS,
Orsay, 91405, France
alardon@ifec.net


Background   Back pain is a common condition during childhood and adolescence. The causes of back pain are largely unknown but it seems plausible that some physical factors such as back muscle strength, back muscle endurance and aerobic capacity may play a role in its development, in particular in the early years.

Objectives   The objectives of this review were to investigate in childhood and adolescence 1) if muscular strength in trunk extension is associated with back pain, 2) if muscular endurance in trunk extension is associated with back pain and 3) if aerobic capacity is associated with back pain.

Design   Three systematic critical literature reviews with one meta-analysis.

Methods   Systematic searches were made in June 2014 in PubMed, Embase and SportDiscus including longitudinal, retrospective or cross-sectional studies on back pain for subjects <20 years. Articles were accepted if they were written in French or English. The review process followed the AMSTAR recommendations. The possibility of conducting a meta-analysis was assessed for each research question.

Results   Four articles were included for the first objective, four for the second and three for the last. None of the included articles found an association between back muscle strength in extension and back pain. For the second objective, a protective association between back muscle endurance in extension and back pain was found, later confirmed in a meta-analysis (OR = 0.75, 95 % CI 0.58-0.98). The association between aerobic capacity and back pain is not clear.

Conclusions   High back muscle endurance in extension appears protective of back pain in youngsters, but the roles of high back muscle strength in extension and aerobic capacity are less clear.

Keywords:   Back pain; Adolescent; Children; Back muscle endurance; Back muscle strength; Aerobic capacity; Meta-analysis; Systematic review


From the Full-Text Article:

Background

Pain is relatively common in childhood and adolescence [1]. For example, in a population of circa 3000 adolescents, 61 % reported musculoskeletal pain at least in one area [2]. Back pain (BP) was noted to be the second most common type with 25 % reporting daily complaints [2]. BP is common during childhood and has been shown to be a predictor of low back pain (LBP) in adulthood [3]. Therefore, more knowledge is needed about BP in the early years, as attention needs to be focused on this period of life.

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