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Schoolbags and Back Pain in Children Between 8 and 13 Years

By |July 9, 2017|Backpacks, Pediatrics|

Schoolbags and Back Pain in Children Between 8 and 13 Years: A National Study

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Br J Pain. 2017 (May); 11 (2): 81–86 ~ FULL TEXT

Karl Spiteri, Maria-Louisa Busuttil,
Samuel Aquilina, Dorothy Gauci,
Erin Camilleri, and Victor Grech

Malta Association of Physiotherapists,
Gzira, Malta.


Schoolbag weight in schoolchildren is a recurrent and contentious issue within the educational and health sphere. Excessive schoolbag weight can lead to back pain in children, which increases the risk of chronic back pain in adulthood. There is limited research regarding this among the Maltese paediatric population. A cross-sectional study was undertaken across all schools in Malta among students aged 8–13 years (inclusive). Data were collected using a questionnaire detailing schoolbag characteristics, self-reported pain and demographic variables, such as age and gender. Structured interviews with participants were also carried out by physiotherapists. A total of 4,005 participants were included in the study, with 20% of the total Malta schoolchildren population. Over 70% of the subjects had a schoolbag that exceeded the recommended 10% bag weight to body ratio. A total of 32% of the sample complained of back pain, with 74% of these defining it as low in intensity on the face pain scale-revised. The presence of back pain was statistically related to gender, body mass index (BMI), school and bag weight to body weight ratio. After adjusting for other factors, self-reported back pain in schoolchildren is independently linked to carrying heavy schoolbags. This link should be addressed to decrease the occurrence of back pain in this age group.


From the FULL TEXT Article:

Introduction

Carrying schoolbags and school attendance is a daily routine for students. The incorrect handling of schoolbags with excessive bag weight can lead to back pain in children. [1–4
] It is recommended that the total weight of the schoolbag does not exceed 10% of body weight. [1] The development of back pain in children is of concern since it increases the risk of developing chronic back pain in adulthood. [5] Studies have shown that the prevalence of low back pain in schoolchildren ranges from 25% to 55% in those aged between 10 and 15 years. [6–8] In most cases, the pain intensity is relatively low.[7]

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Posturing for Wellness: Good Health Begins with Good Posture

By |February 13, 2013|Backpacks, Chiropractic Care, Posture|

Posturing for Wellness: Good Health Begins with Good Posture

The Chiro.Org Blog



SOURCE:   The ACA


Doctors of chiropractic have long emphasized the importance of posture and other lifestyle factors in the body’s ability to function optimally. In a broad sense, good posture can be considered an ongoing battle against bad habits. “The body endures hundreds of insults each day,” says Scott W. Donkin, DC, DACBOH, “but we have the choice of controlling how they affect us. Once destructive habits are identified, people can change, prevent, and relieve both present and future physical problems. The quality of our later years can be enhanced and many physical problems prevented if we understand and deal early on with the underlying issues.” Dr. Donkin is the author of Sitting on the Job. [1]

Lifetime Regimen

What most people don’t know is that the following should be a lifetime regimen-for everyone-and not just when the back hurts. ACA Council on Chiropractic Orthopedics vice president Gary L. Carver, DC, DABCO, says that when they first get up in the morning, “People should use their hands and arms for support to get into a seated position. Next, they should swing their legs to the floor and stand up-using the hinge of the hips, rather than the back.”

But once the body is upright, is it up right? In other words, are the muscles, joints, and skeleton in a balanced posture? Too often, the answer is “no.” “As long as our body is performing, we take it for granted. We don’t concentrate on what we need to do to maintain good posture habits,” says Leo Bronston, DC, DABCO, DACAN, CCSP, and secretary of the ACA Council on Chiropractic Orthopedics. “Generally, we tend to hunch forward when we should be rolling our shoulders back and opening up the chest wall. That is something we need to practice-activating the proper postural muscles. We see many patients who simply don’t know how to achieve a more balanced trunk and neutral spine. Just as we learned to eat with a fork and that became automatic, we can train our muscles for good posture and balance, whether we’re standing, rising from a seated position, or getting out of bed.”

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Effect of Backpack Load Carriage on Cervical Posture in Primary Schoolchildren

By |February 11, 2012|Backpacks, Forward Head Posture, Pediatrics|

Effect of Backpack Load Carriage on Cervical Posture in Primary Schoolchildren

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Work. 2012 (Jan 1);   41 (1):   99—108

By Fran Kistner, Ira Fiebert, Kathryn Roach

School of Physical Therapy, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Worcester, MA, USA.


Objective:   This study examined the effects of various backpack loads on elementary schoolchildren’s posture and postural compensations as demonstrated by a change in forward head position.

Subjects:   A convenience sample of 11 schoolchildren, aged 8-11 years participated.

Methods:   Sagittal digital photographs were taken of each subject standing without a backpack, and then with the loaded backpack before and after walking 6 minutes (6MWT) at free walking speed. This was repeated over three consecutive weeks using backpacks containing randomly assigned weights of 10%, 15%, or 20% body weight of each respective subject. The craniovertebral angle (CVA) was measured using digitizing software, recorded and analyzed. (more…)

Trading Backpacks For Rolling Luggage Fails in German Primary School Study

By |December 19, 2010|Backpacks, Books, Low Back Pain, News, Pediatrics|

Trading Backpacks For Rolling Luggage Fails in German Primary School Study

The Chiro.Org Blog


It’s well understood that heavy backpacks are taking a heavy toll (excuse the pun!) on adolescent spines. [1] A recent standing magnetic resonance imaging study by the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California, at San Diego revealed that: “Increasing backpack loads significantly compressed lumbar disc heights measured in the midline sagittal plane” and that: “student subjects reported significant increases in back pain, associated with increasing backpack loads from 4, to 8, and finally to 12 kgs of carried weight”. (more…)