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Effects of Upper and Lower Cervical Spinal Manipulative Therapy on Blood Pressure

By |January 14, 2016|Blood Pressure|

Effects of Upper and Lower Cervical Spinal Manipulative Therapy on Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Variability in Volunteers and Patients With Neck Pain: A Randomized Controlled, Cross-Over, Preliminary Study

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Chiro Med 2015 (Mar); 14 (1): 1–9 ~ FULL TEXT

Ni Ni Win, MBBS, PhD, Anna Maria S. Jorgensen, PhD,
Yu Sui Chen, PhD, and Michael T. Haneline, DC, MPH

Senior Lecturer, International Medical University,
Chiropractic, School of Health Sciences,
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia


OBJECTIVE:   The aims of this study were to examine autonomic nervous system responses by using heart rate variability analysis (HRV), hemodynamic parameters and numeric pain scale (NPS) when either upper (C1 and C2) or lower (C6 and C7) cervical segments were manipulated in volunteers, and whether such response would be altered in acute mechanical neck pain patients after spinal manipulative therapy (SMT).

METHODS:   A randomized controlled, cross-over, preliminary study was conducted on 10 asymptomatic normotensive volunteers and 10 normotensive patients complaining of acute neck pain. HRV, blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR), and NPS were recorded after upper cervical and lower cervical segments SMT in volunteer and patient groups.

RESULTS:   The standard deviation of average normal to normal R-R intervals (SDNN) increased (83.54 ± 22 vs. 105.41 ± 20; P = .02) after upper cervical SMT. The normalized unit of high frequency (nuHF), which shows parasympathetic activity, was predominant (40.18 ± 9 vs. 46.08 ± 14) after upper cervical SMT (P = .03) with a significant decrease (109 ± 10 vs. 98 ± 5) in systolic BP (P = .002). Low frequency to high frequency (LF/HF) ratio, which shows predominance of sympathetic activity increased (1.05 ± 0.7 vs. 1.51 ± 0.5; P = .02) after lower cervical SMT in the healthy volunteers group. However, there was an increase in SDNN (70.48 ± 18 vs. 90.23 ± 20; P = .02 and 75.19 ± 16 vs 97.52 ± 22; P = .01), a decrease in LF/HF ratio (1.33 ± 0.3 vs. 0.81 ± 0.2; P = .001 and 1.22 ± 0.4 vs. 0.86 ± 0.3; P = .02), which was associated with decreased systolic BP (105 ± 10 vs. 95 ± 9; P = .01 and 102 ± 9 vs. 91 ± 10; P = .02) and NPS scores (3 ± 1 vs. 0; P = .01 and 3 ± 1 vs. 1 ± 1; P = .03) following both upper and lower cervical SMT in the patient’s group. The baseline HR was 67 ± 9 vs 64 ± 5 (upper cervical) and 65 ± 7 vs 69 ± 11 (lower cervical) in both the healthy volunteer’ and patient’ groups.

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Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Responses to Specific Diversified Adjustments to Chiropractic Vertebral Subluxations of the Cervical and Thoracic Spine

By |November 27, 2015|Blood Pressure|

Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Responses to Specific Diversified Adjustments to Chiropractic Vertebral Subluxations of the Cervical and Thoracic Spine

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Chiropractic Medicine 2008 (Sep);   7 (3):   86–93

Arlene Welch, DC, Ralph Boone, PhD, DC

Instructor of Clinical Sciences and Health Center Faculty Doctor,
Sherman College of Straight Chiropractic,
Spartanburg, SC 29304


OBJECTIVE:   The aims of this study were to investigate the response of the autonomic nervous system based upon the area of the spine adjusted and to determine if a cervical adjustment elicits a parasympathetic response and if a thoracic adjustment elicits a sympathetic response.

METHODS:   Forty patients (25-55 years old) met inclusion criteria that consisted of normal blood pressure, no history of heart disease, and being asymptomatic. Patients were evaluated pre- and post-chiropractic adjustment for the following autonomic responses: blood pressure and pulse rate. Seven patients were measured for heart rate variability. The subjects received either a diversified cervical segment adjustment or a diversified thoracic segment adjustment.

RESULTS:   Diastolic pressure (indicating a sympathetic response) dropped significantly postadjustment among those receiving cervical adjustments, accompanied by a moderate clinical effect (0.50). Pulse pressure increased significantly among those receiving cervical adjustments, accompanied by a large effect size (0.82). Although the decrease in pulse pressure for those receiving thoracic adjustments was not statistically significant, the decrease was accompanied by a moderate effect size (0.66).

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Why Chiropractic Care Reduces Blood Pressure

By |July 17, 2011|Blood Pressure, Chiropractic Technique|

Why Chiropractic Care Reduces Blood Pressure

The Chiro.Org Blog


Several news stories reported on a study performed at the University of Leeds in England, and published in the August 1, 2007 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience [1], that showed links between neck muscles and the brain and that this link plays a crucial role in controlling blood pressure.

One report by UPI on August 2, 2007 starts off by stating:

A University of Leeds chance discovery in a British laboratory shows why a chiropractic adjustment for a pain in the neck may do wonders for blood pressure.

This article quotes study leader Professor Jim Deuchars, who notes that his finding found pathways between the neck and the brain and shows how the neck muscles could play an important role in controlling blood pressure, and why chiropractic care works so well with blood pressure.

He states, “By identifying the pathways we can see why these treatments might work and it could also explain why some people suffering whiplash injuries may experience a change in their blood pressure.”

As he mentions in the article, Professor Deuchars notes that the Leeds study further corroborates the work done at the Hypertension Center at the University of Chicago Medical Center and published in the March 2, 2007 issue of the Journal of Human Hypertension. In that previous study 25 people in the study group receiving the chiropractic adjustments all showed a significant reduction in blood pressure compared with groups in the study that did not get chiropractic adjustments. (more…)

Palmer Recruiting for Next Blood Pressure Study

By |December 24, 2009|Blood Pressure, Research|

Palmer Recruiting for Next Blood Pressure Study

The Chiro.Org Blog


The Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research is recruiting subjects with high blood pressure to participate in a clinical research study designed to evaluate the potential impact of chiropractic care on hypertension.

The Chiropractic for Hypertension in Patients (CHiP) study, a collaborative investigation involving the Palmer Center, Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami, Fla., and Trinity at Terrace Park Family Practice in Bettendorf, Iowa, is one of three research projects to emerge from a $2.8 million grant awarded to the Palmer Center in 2008 by the National Institutes of Health to create a multidisciplinary Developmental Center for Clinical and Translational Science in Chiropractic. (more…)

Upper Cervical Care Reduces Blood Pressure

By |February 18, 2009|Blood Pressure, Research, Spinal Manipulation|

Upper Cervical Care Reduces Blood Pressure

The Chiro.Org Blog


Anatomical abnormalities of the cervical spine at the level of the Atlas vertebra are associated with relative ischaemia of the brainstem circulation and increased blood pressure (BP). Manual correction of this mal-alignment has been associated with reduced arterial pressure.

Read the FULL-TEXT at the:
Journal of Human Hypertension 2007 (May); 21 (5): 347–352

From Good Morning America