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Systematic Review of Self-Reported Prognosis in Adults After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

By |July 21, 2017|Chiropractic Management, Mild Traumatic Brain Injury|

Systematic Review of Self-Reported Prognosis in Adults After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Results of the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis

The Chiro.Org Blog


Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014 (Mar); 95 (3 Suppl): S132–151

J. David Cassidy, PhD, DrMedSc, Carol Cancelliere, DC, MPH,
Linda J. Carroll, PhD, Pierre Côté, DC, PhD,
Cesar A. Hincapié, DC, MHSc, Lena W. Holm, et al.

Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics,
Faculty of Health, University of Southern Denmark,
Odense, Denmark


OBJECTIVE:   To update the mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) prognosis review published by the World Health Organization Task Force in 2004.

DATA SOURCES:   MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Embase, CINAHL, and SPORTDiscus were searched from 2001 to 2012. We included published, peer-reviewed studies with more than 30 adult cases.

STUDY SELECTION:   Controlled trials and cohort and case-control studies were selected according to predefined criteria. Studies had to assess subjective, self-reported outcomes. After 77,914 titles and abstracts were screened, 299 articles were eligible and reviewed for scientific quality. This includes 3 original International Collaboration on MTBI Prognosis (ICoMP) research studies.

DATA EXTRACTION:   Eligible studies were critically appraised using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria. Two reviewers independently reviewed each study and tabled data from accepted articles. A third reviewer was consulted for disagreements.

DATA SYNTHESIS:   Evidence from accepted studies was synthesized qualitatively into key findings, and prognostic information was prioritized according to design as exploratory or confirmatory. Of 299 reviewed studies, 101 (34%) were accepted and form our evidence base of prognostic studies. Of these, 23 addressed self-reported outcomes in adults, including 2 of the 3 original ICoMP research studies. These studies show that common postconcussion symptoms are not specific to MTBI/concussion and occur after other injuries as well. Poor recovery after MTBI is associated with poorer premorbid mental and physical health status and with more injury-related stress. Most recover over 1 year, but persistent symptoms are more likely in those with more acute symptoms and more emotional stress.

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Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Page

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Is EBM Damaging the Social Conscience of Chiropractic?

By |December 7, 2016|Chiropractic Management, Evidence-based Medicine|

Commentary: Is EBM Damaging the Social Conscience of Chiropractic?

The Chiro.Org Blog


Chiropractic J Australia 2016 (Dec); 44 (3): 203–213 ~ FULL TEXT

Phillip Stuart Ebrall, BAppSc(Chiropr), GradCert (Learn&Teach), PhD

Senior Education Advisor,
Tokyo College of Chiropractic;
Faculty of Medicine,
International Medical University,
Kuala Lumpur


Introduction:   One expression of the social conscience of chiropractic is the provision by chiropractic educational institutions of low-cost or free chiropractic care to disadvantaged communities. It is expected that institutions offer to all patients the same full standard of care that is the hallmark of traditional chiropractic.

Objective:   To explore whether an observed schism occurring within chiropractic education, where a minority of institutions are minimising the major premise of the discipline and replacing it with an emphasis on only the science or literature component of the evidence-based triad, has any potential impact on the quality of care provided particularly within the charitable context.

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Chiropractic Subluxation Page

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Chiropractic Management of a Patient With Breast Cancer Metastases

By |November 3, 2015|Cancer, Chiropractic Management|

Chiropractic Management of a Patient With Breast Cancer Metastases to the Brain and Spine: A Case Report

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Can Chiropr Assoc 2015 (Sep);   59 (3):   269–278 ~ FULL TEXT

Ismat Kanga, BSc, DC, FCCS(C) 1 and Igor Steiman, MSc, DC, FCCS(C) 2

1 Private Practice,
Mumbai, India.

2 Professor, Division of Undergraduate Studies,
Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College,
Toronto, Ontario


Cancers of the breast, kidney, lungs, prostate and thyroid metastasize to the musculoskeletal system in the majority of patients with malignancy. This report chronicles the case of a 65-year-old female with a known history of breast cancer who presented to a chiropractic clinic. Once metastasis was ruled out as the cause of her complaint, the patient was treated with manual therapies and exercises. As the patient’s treatments progressed and her pain improved, she presented with a new complaint of ‘pressure’ in her head. Advanced imaging revealed metastasis to the brain and subsequently to the spine. The aim of this case is to heighten awareness of the presentation of metastasis to the brain and the spine in a chiropractic patient, and to demonstrate the benefit of chiropractic care in the management of such patients.

KEYWORDS:   brain metastases; breast cancer; chiropractic; chiropractic care; spinal metastases


From the FULL TEXT Article:

Introduction

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Cancer and Chiropractic Page

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The Chiropractic Profession in Norway

By |December 9, 2014|Chiropractic Management|

The Chiropractic Profession in Norway

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2014 (Dec 8)   22   44

Ole C Kvammen and Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde

Private practice,
Fokus Helse og Trening,
Aagaards pl. 5,
Sandefjord 3211, Norway


Background   The chiropractic profession in Norway has increased five-fold in the last two decades. As there is no academic graduate program in Norway, all chiropractors have been trained outside of Norway, in either Europe, America or Australia. This might have given Norwegian chiropractors heterogenic characteristics concerning practice routines and clinical settings. However, little is known about what characterizes this profession and how it compares to other chiropractic professions in Europe. The aim of this survey was to describe major characteristics of the chiropractic profession in Norway.

Method   Two surveys were distributed to all 530 registered chiropractors in Norway in 2011. One survey was for all chiropractors (Survey 1) and the other for clinic owners (Survey 2). Results have been reported as tables and as approximate percentages in the text for ease of reading.

Result   Response rates were 61% (Survey 1, N = 320) and 71% (Survey 2, N = 217). More than two-thirds of the chiropractors in Norway had been in practice for under a decade. Only one in four chiropractors worked in solo practice and the majority shared premises with at least one colleague, typically at least one physiotherapist and one additional health practitioner. Today, only one in five clinics possessed radiologic equipment and one in ten had access to diagnostic ultrasound equipment. The majority of the chiropractors reported to apply mainly similar treatment modalities. More than 90% reported to use manipulation techniques on most patients, with soft tissue techniques and exercise modalities being almost as common. More than 3/4 of the profession reported that their clinical practice was in accordance with available clinical guidelines and about one third were positive about participating in future clinical research.

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Pre-Eclampsia and the Impact on Chiropractic Management of the Pregnant Patient

By |August 3, 2014|Chiropractic Management, Pre-Eclampsia, Pregnancy|

Pre-Eclampsia and the Impact
on Chiropractic Management
of the Pregnant Patient

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Clinical Chiropractic Pediatrics 2012 (Dec)

Sharon Gordon, BAppSc(Chiro), DICCP and Sherryn Silverthorne, M Clinical Chiro, RN, RM

Sharon Gordon, BAppSc(Chiro), DICCP
Private Practice, Gippsland, Victoria, Australia

Sherryn Silverthorne, M Clinical Chiro, RN, RM
Private Practice, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia


Up to 10% of women develop pre-eclampsia during pregnancy. It is a significant cause of mortality, responsible for 10-15% of maternal deaths. Its diagnosis is based on the presence of hypertension, with or without proteinuria and edema. As primary contact health care providers, chiropractors must be aware of the risk factors, clinical signs of pre-eclampsia, and the need to modify their management appropriately. An open internet search was conducted for current guidelines in scientific journal databases, in the diagnosis and management of pre-eclampsia. Although there is little literature outlining the role of the chiropractor in patient management, it is clear that specific history and examination procedures must be performed for appropriate co-management and referral.

Key Words:   pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, toxemia, hypertension, pregnancy, chiropractic


From the Full-Text Article:

Introduction

Pre-eclampsia (also known as toxemia of pregnancy) is one of the major causes of maternal mortality and morbidity. 10%-15% of maternal deaths are directly associated with pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. [1] Up to 10% of pregnant women develop pre-eclampsia. [2] The incidence of pre-eclampsia in the nulliparous woman is cited as being between 3%-7% and for the multiparous woman 1%-3%. [1, 3] This diagnosis is based on the presence of hypertension, proteinuria, with or without edema. As primary contact health care providers, chiropractors must be aware of the risk factors, clinical signs of pre-eclampsia, and the need to modify their management appropriately.


Objective

To review the diagnostic criteria, risk factors and complications of pre-eclampsia, and discuss how this may affect chiropractic management of the pregnant patient.


Methods

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Chiropractic Pediatrics Section and our:

Female Issues and Chiropractic Page

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