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Is Neck Pain Associated with Worse Health-related Quality of Life 6 Months Later? A Population-based Cohort Study

By |October 16, 2018|Chronic Neck Pain|

Is Neck Pain Associated with Worse Health-related Quality of Life 6 Months Later? A Population-based Cohort Study

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SOURCE:   Spine J. 2015 (Apr 1);   15 (4):   675–684

Paul S. Nolet, DC, MS, MPHa, Pierre Cote, DC, PhD, Vicki L. Kristman, PhD, Mana Rezai, DC, MHS, Linda J. Carroll, PhD, J. David Cassidy, DC, PhD, DrMedSc

Department of Graduate Education and Research,
Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College,
6100 Leslie Street,
North York, Ontario, Canada. M2H 3J1.


BACKGROUND CONTEXT:   Current evidence suggests that neck pain is negatively associated with health-related quality of life (HRQoL). However, these studies are cross-sectional and do not inform the association between neck pain and future HRQoL.

PURPOSE:   The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between increasing grades of neck pain severity and HRQoL 6 months later. In addition, this longitudinal study examines the crude association between the course of neck pain and HRQoL.

STUDY DESIGN:   This is a population-based cohort study.

PATIENT SAMPLE:     Eleven hundred randomly sampled Saskatchewan adults were included.

OUTCOME MEASURES:   Outcome measures were the mental component summary (MCS) and physical component summary (PCS) of the Short-Form-36 (SF-36) questionnaire.

METHODS:   We formed a cohort of 1,100 randomly sampled Saskatchewan adults in September 1995. We used the Chronic Pain Questionnaire to measure neck pain and its related disability. The SF-36 questionnaire was used to measure physical and mental HRQoL 6 months later. Multivariable linear regression was used to measure the association between graded neck pain and HRQoL while controlling for confounding. Analysis of variance and t tests were used to measure the crude association among four possible courses of neck pain and HRQoL at 6 months. The neck pain trajectories over 6 months were no or mild neck pain, improving neck pain, worsening neck pain, and persistent neck pain. Finally, analysis of variance was used to examine changes in baseline to 6-month PCS and MCS scores among the four neck pain trajectory groups.

RESULTS:   The 6-month follow-up rate was 74.9%. We found an exposure-response relationship between neck pain and physical HRQoL after adjusting for age, education, arthritis, low back pain, and depressive symptomatology. Compared with participants without neck pain at baseline, those with mild (β=–1.53, 95% confidence interval [CI]=–2.83, –0.24), intense (β=–3.60, 95% CI=–5.76, –1.44), or disabling (β=–8.55, 95% CI=–11.68, –5.42) neck pain had worse physical HRQoL 6 months later. We did not find an association between neck pain and mental HRQoL. A worsening course of neck pain and persistent neck pain were associated with worse physical HRQoL.

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Group and Individual-level Change on Health-related Quality of Life in Chiropractic Patients with Chronic Low Back or Neck Pain

By |October 13, 2018|Chronic Neck Pain, Low Back Pain|

Group and Individual-level Change on Health-related Quality of Life in Chiropractic Patients with Chronic Low Back or Neck Pain

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2018 (Oct 11) [Epub]

Ron D. Hays, Ph.D., Karen L. Spritzer, B.S., Cathy D. Sherbourne, Ph.D., Gery W. Ryan, Ph.D., Ian D. Coulter, Ph.D.

Division of General Internal Medicine & Health Services Research
UCLA Department of Medicine
911 Broxton Avenue
Los Angeles, CA


STUDY DESIGN:   Prospective observational study.

OBJECTIVE:   To evaluate group-level and individual-level change in health-related quality of life among persons with chronic low back pain or neck pain receiving chiropractic care in the United States.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:   Chiropractors treat chronic low back and neck pain, but there is limited evidence of the effectiveness of their treatment

METHODS:   A 3–month longitudinal study of 2,024 patients with chronic low back pain or neck pain receiving care from 125 chiropractic clinics at 6 locations throughout the United States was conducted. Ninety-one percent of the sample completed the baseline and 3–month follow-up survey (n = 1,835). Average age was 49, 74% females, and most of the sample had a college degree, were non-Hispanic White, worked full-time, and had an annual income of $60,000 or more. Group-level (within group t-tests) and individual-level (coefficient of repeatability) changes on the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) v2.0 profile measure was evaluated: 6 multi-item scales (physical functioning, pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, social health, emotional distress) and physical and mental health summary scores.

RESULTS:   Within group t-tests indicated significant group-level change (p < 0.05) for all scores except for emotional distress, and these changes represented small improvements in health (absolute value of effect sizes ranged from 0.08 for physical functioning to 0.20 for pain). From 13% (physical functioning) to 30% (PROMIS-29 Mental Health Summary Score) got better from baseline to 3 months later according to the coefficient of repeatability.

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Characteristics of Chiropractic Patients Being Treated for Chronic Low Back and Neck Pain

By |September 1, 2018|Chronic Neck Pain, Low Back Pain|

Characteristics of Chiropractic Patients Being Treated for Chronic Low Back and Neck Pain

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SOURCE:   J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2018 (Aug 15) [Epub]

Scott Haldeman, Claire D. Johnson, Roger Chou, Margareta Nordin, Pierre Côté, Eric L. Hurwitz, Bart N. Green, Christine Cedraschi et. al.

RAND Corporation,
Santa Monica, California.


OBJECTIVES:   Chronic low back pain (CLBP) and chronic neck pain (CNP) are the most common types of chronic pain, and chiropractic spinal manipulation is a common nonpharmacologic treatment. This study presents the characteristics of a large United States sample of chiropractic patients with CLBP and CNP.

METHODS:   Data were collected from chiropractic patients using multistage systematic stratified sampling with 4 sampling levels: regions and states, sites (ie, metropolitan areas), providers and clinics, and patients. The sites and regions were San Diego, California; Tampa, Florida; Minneapolis, Minnesota; Seneca Falls and Upstate New York; Portland, Oregon; and Dallas, Texas. Data were collected from patients through an iPad-based prescreening questionnaire in the clinic and emailed links to full screening and baseline online questionnaires. The goal was 20 providers or clinics and 7 patients with CLBP and 7 with CNP from each clinic.

RESULTS:   We had 6342 patients at 125 clinics complete the prescreening questionnaire, 3333 patients start the full screening questionnaire, and 2024 eligible patients completed the baseline questionnaire: 518 with CLBP only, 347 with CNP only, and 1159 with both. In general, most of this sample were highly-educated, non-Hispanic, white females with at least partial insurance coverage for chiropractic care who have been in pain and using chiropractic care for years. Over 90% reported high satisfaction with their care, few used narcotics, and avoiding surgery was the most important reason they chose chiropractic care.

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Chronic Neck Pain and Chiropractic
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Back and Neck Pain Exhibit Many Common Features in Old Age

By |June 20, 2018|Chronic Low Back Pain, Chronic Neck Pain|

Back and Neck Pain Exhibit Many Common Features in Old Age: A Population-based Study of 4,486 Danish Twins 70-102 Years of Age

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SOURCE:   Spine 2004 (Mar 1); 29 (5): 576–580

Jan Hartvigsen, DC, PhD, Kaare Christensen, MD, PhD, and Henrik Frederiksen, MD, PhD

Nordic Institute of Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics,
Institute of Public Health,
University of Southern Denmark,
Odense C, Denmark.


STUDY DESIGN:   Cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of data comprising 4,486 Danish twins 70-102 years of age.

OBJECTIVES:   To describe the 1-month prevalence of back pain, neck pain, and concurrent back and neck pain and the development of these over time, associations with other health problems, education, smoking, and physical, and mental functioning.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:   Back pain and neck pain are prevalent symptoms in the population; however, there is little research addressing these conditions in older age groups.

METHODS:   Extensive interview data on health, lifestyle, social, and educational factors were collected in a nationwide cohort-sequential study of 70+ year-old Danish twins. Data for back pain, neck pain, lifetime prevalence of a comprehensive list of diseases, education, and self-rated health were based on self-report. Physical and mental functioning were measured using validated performance tests. Data including associated factors were analyzed in a cross-sectional analysis for answers given at entry into the study, and longitudinal analysis was performed for participants in all four surveys.

RESULTS:   The overall 1-month prevalence for back pain only was 15%, for neck pain only 11%, and for concurrent back and neck pain 11%. The prevalence varied negligibly over time and between the age groups, and 63% of participants in all surveys had no episodes or only one episode of back or neck pain. Back pain and neck pain were associated with a number of other diseases and with poorer self-rated health. Back and neck pain sufferers had significantly lower scores on physical but not cognitive functioning.

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Association Between Centralization and Directional Preference and Functional and Pain Outcomes in Patients With Neck Pain

By |June 3, 2018|Chronic Neck Pain, McKenzie|

Association Between Centralization and Directional Preference and Functional and Pain Outcomes in Patients With Neck Pain

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2014 (Feb); 44 (2): 68–75

Susan L. Edmond, PT, DSc, OCS, Guillermo Cutrone, PT, DSc, OCS, Cert MDT, FAAOMPT, Mark Werneke, PT, MS, Dip MDT et. al.

Rutgers,
The State University of New Jersey,
Newark, NJ.


STUDY DESIGN:   Retrospective cohort.

OBJECTIVES:   In subjects with neck pain, the present study aimed (1) to describe the prevalence of centralization (CEN), noncentralization (non-CEN), directional preference (DP), and no directional preference (no DP); (2) to determine if age, sex, fear-avoidance beliefs about physical activity, number of comorbid conditions, or symptom duration varies among subjects who demonstrate CEN versus non-CEN and DP versus no DP; and (3) to determine if CEN and/or DP are associated with changes in function and pain.

BACKGROUND:   CEN and DP are prevalent among patients with low back pain and should be considered when determining treatment strategies and predicting outcomes; however, these findings are not well investigated in patients with neck pain.

METHODS:   Three hundred four subjects contributed data. CEN and DP prevalence were calculated, as was the association between CEN and DP, and age, sex, number of comorbid conditions, fear-avoidance beliefs, and symptom duration. Multivariate models assessed whether CEN and DP predicted change in function and pain.

RESULTS:   CEN and DP prevalence were 0.4 and 0.7, respectively. Younger subjects and those with fewer comorbid conditions were more likely to centralize; however, subjects who demonstrated DP were more likely to have acute symptoms. Subjects who centralized experienced, on average, a 3.6-point (95% confidence interval: -0.3, 7.4) improvement in function scores, whereas subjects with a DP averaged a 5.4-point (95% confidence interval: 0.8, 10.0) improvement. Neither CEN nor DP was associated with pain outcomes.

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Association of Subclinical Neck Pain With Altered Multisensory Integration

By |March 11, 2018|Chronic Neck Pain|

Association of Subclinical Neck Pain With Altered Multisensory Integration at Baseline and 4-Week Follow-up Relative to Asymptomatic Controls

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2018 (Feb); 41 (2): 81–91

Bassem Farid, BHSc (Hons), Paul Yielder, PhD, Michael Holmes, PhD, Heidi Haavik, PhD, Bernadette A. Murphy, DC, PhD

Health Sciences,
University of Ontario Institute of Technology,
Oshawa, Ontario, Canada.


 

OBJECTIVE:   The purpose of this study was to test whether people with subclinical neck pain (SCNP) had altered visual, auditory, and multisensory response times, and whether these findings were consistent over time.

METHODS:   Twenty-five volunteers (12 SCNP and 13 asymptomatic controls) were recruited from a Canadian university student population. A 2-alternative forced-choice discrimination task with multisensory redundancy was used to measure response times to the presentation of visual (color filled circles), auditory (verbalization of the color words, eg, red or blue), and multisensory (simultaneous audiovisual) stimuli at baseline and 4 weeks later.

RESULTS:   The SCNP group was slower at both visual and multisensory tasks (P = .046, P = .020, respectively), with no change over 4 weeks. Auditory response times improved slightly but significantly after 4 weeks (P = .050) with no group difference.

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