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Wellness-related Use of Common Complementary Health Approaches Among Adults

By |November 16, 2015|Chiropractic Care, Complementary Medicine|

Wellness-related Use of Common Complementary Health Approaches Among Adults: United States, 2012

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SOURCE:   Natl Health Stat Report. 2015 (Nov 4);   (85):   1–12 ~ FULL TEXT

Barbara J. Stussman, B.A., Lindsey I. Black, M.P.H.,
Patricia M. Barnes, M.A., and Tainya C. Clarke, Ph.D., M.P.H.,
and Richard L. Nahin, Ph.D., M.P.H.

National Institutes of Health
National Center for Health Statistics


Objective   This 12 page National Institutes of Health report presents national estimates of selected wellness-related reasons for the use of natural product supplements, yoga, and spinal manipulation among U.S. adults in 2012. Self-reported perceived health outcomes were also examined.

Methods   Data from 34,525 adults aged 18 and over collected as part of the 2012 National Health Interview Survey were analyzed for this report. In particular, whether adults who used selected complementary health approaches did so to treat a specific health condition or for any of five wellness-related reasons was examined, as well as whether these adults perceived that this use led to any of nine health-related outcomes. Sampling weights were used to produce national estimates that are representative of the civilian noninstitutionalized U.S. adult population.

Results   Users of natural product supplements and yoga were more likely to have reported using the approach for a wellness reason than for treatment of a specific health condition, whereas more spinal manipulation users reported using it for treatment rather than for wellness. The most common wellness-related reason reported by users of each of the three approaches was for ‘‘general wellness or disease prevention.’’ The majority of users of all three health approaches reported that they perceived this use improved their overall health and made them feel better. Yoga users perceived higher rates of all of the self-reported wellness-related health outcomes than users of natural product supplements or spinal manipulation.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Maintenance Care, Wellness and Chiropractic Page

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The Collateral Benefits Of Having Chiropractic Available In A Public Central Hospital

By |February 1, 2014|Chiropractic Care, Complementary Medicine, Evidence-based Medicine, Integrative Care, Non-Musculoskeletal Conditions|

The Collateral Benefits Of Having Chiropractic Available In A Public Central Hospital

The Chiro.Org Blog


Journal of Hospital Administration 2013 (Aug 8); 2 (4): 138–143 ~ FULL TEXT

Jan Roar Orlin, Andrè Didriksen, Helge Hagen, Anders Sørfonden

Dept. of Orthopedics, Central Hospital (FSS), Førde, Norway, and
Dept. of Ear-Nose-Throat, Central Hospital (FSS), Førde, Norway


Thanks to Dana Lawrence, DC for drawing our attention to this article!


Following previous reports on the co-operation between a chiropractor and a central hospital, experiences from the past five years are presented. The objective of this paper is to show that improved management of muscular and skeletal problems within a hospital setting depends on the availability of chiropractic health care as a treatment option.

The following pain groups were sampled:

1) sacro-lumbar dysfunction and sciatic leg symptoms, with or without joint dysfunction and sciatica;

2) myo-fascial referred pain syndromes, frequently caused by peripheral nerve entrapment; and

3) tinnitus, dizziness/vertigo, facial pain, ear plug and swallowing difficulties, frequently caused by biomechanical components.

A majority of pain patients, after being subjected to traditional conservative treatment, usually over a period of several years, fail to return to work despite younger than average age. The only effective procedures seem to be those of chiropractors. In order to benefit from their particular knowledge, public hospitals need to open their doors to chiropractors. For that to happen, determined hospital administrators are needed.


1.   Introduction

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A Practical Guide to Avoiding Drug-Induced Nutrient Depletion

By |June 25, 2012|Clinical Decision-making, Complementary Medicine, Diagnosis, Drug-Induced Nutrient Depletion, Evaluation & Management, Evidence-based Medicine, Iatrogenic Injury, Supplementation|

A Practical Guide to Avoiding Drug-Induced Nutrient Depletion

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SOURCE:   Nutrition Review ~ October 2011

By Hyla Cass, MD


A little known, but potentially life-saving fact is that common medications deplete your body of a host of vital nutrients essential to your health. This practical guide will show you how to avoid drug-induced nutrient depletion and discuss options for replacing nutrient-robbing medications with natural supplements.

America has been called a pill-popping society, and the statistics bear this out. Nearly 50 percent of all American adults regularly take at least one prescription drug, and 20 percent take three or more. [1] Our increasing reliance on prescription medications has contributed to the growing problem with nutrient depletion. The truth is that every medication, including over-the-counter drugs, depletes your body of specific, vital nutrients. This is especially concerning when you consider that most Americans are already suffering from nutrient depletion. Additionally, many of the conditions physicians see in their everyday practice may actually be related to nutrient depletion. The good news is that, armed with information and the right supplements, you can avoid the side effects of nutrient depletion, and even better, you may be able to control and prevent chronic diseases, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis.

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Nutrient Depletion Page

A Common Scenario

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