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The Stress Test

By |November 3, 2014|Continuing Education|

The Stress Test

The Chiro.Org Blog



I’m not sure exactly how it works, but this is an amazingly accurate test.
The attached photo (see below) has 2 virtually identical dolphins in it.

It was used in a case study on stress levels at St. Mary’s Hospital.

Look at both dolphins jumping out of the water.

The dolphins are identical.

A closely monitored, scientific study of a group revealed that in spite of the fact that the dolphins are identical, a person under stress would observe some differences between the two dolphins.

If there are many differences found between both dolphins, it means that the person is experiencing a greater amount of stress.

Look at the photograph, and if you find more than one or two differences, you may need to take a vacation. (Keep scrolling down)

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Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: An Overview for Manual Therapists

By |October 16, 2014|Continuing Education|

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus:
An Overview for Manual Therapists

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Journal of Chiropractic Medicine 2012 (Mar);   11 (1):   64–76

Bart N. Green, MSEd, DC, Claire D. Johnson, MSEd, DC,
Jonathon Todd Egan, DC, MPH, Michael Rosenthal, PT, DSc, ATC, CDR,
Erin A. Griffith, DO, Marion Willard Evans, DC, PhD

Chiropractor, Chiropractic Division,
Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy,
Naval Medical Center, San Diego, CA


OBJECTIVE:   Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is associated with difficult-to-treat infections and high levels of morbidity. Manual practitioners work in environments where MRSA is a common acquired infection. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical overview of MRSA as it applies to the manual therapy professions (eg, physical and occupational therapy, athletic training, chiropractic, osteopathy, massage, sports medicine) and to discuss how to identify and prevent MRSA infections in manual therapy work environments.

METHODS:   PubMed and CINAHL were searched from the beginning of their respective indexing years through June 2011 using the search terms MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus aureus. Texts and authoritative Web sites were also reviewed. Pertinent articles from the authors’ libraries were included if they were not already identified in the literature search. Articles were included if they were applicable to ambulatory health care environments in which manual therapists work or if the content of the article related to the clinical management of MRSA.

RESULTS:   Following information extraction, 95 citations were included in this review, to include 76 peer-reviewed journal articles, 16 government Web sites, and 3 textbooks. Information was organized into 10 clinically relevant categories for presentation. Information was organized into the following clinically relevant categories: microbiology, development of MRSA, risk factors for infection, clinical presentation, diagnostic tests, screening tests, reporting, treatment, prevention for patients and athletes, and prevention for health care workers.

CONCLUSION:   Methicillin-resistant S aureus is a health risk in the community and to patients and athletes treated by manual therapists. Manual practitioners can play an essential role in recognizing MRSA infections and helping to control its transmission in the health care environment and the community. Essential methods for protecting patients and health care workers include being aware of presenting signs, patient education, and using appropriate hand and clinic hygiene.


From the FULL TEXT Article:

Introduction

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Clinical Presentation of a Patient with Thoracic Myelopathy

By |October 15, 2014|Continuing Education, Myelopathy|

Clinical Presentation of a Patient with Thoracic Myelopathy at a Chiropractic Clinic

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Chiropractic Medicine 2012 (Sep);   11 (2):   115–120

Charles W. Gay, Mark D. Bishop, and Jacqueline L. Beres

Graduate Research Assistant,
Rehabilitation Science Doctoral Program,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.


INTRODUCTION:   The purpose of this case report is to describe the clinical presentation, examination findings, and management decisions of a patient with thoracic myelopathy who presented to a chiropractic clinic.

CASE REPORT/METHODS:   After receiving a diagnosis of a diffuse arthritic condition and kidney stones based on lumbar radiograph interpretation at a local urgent care facility, a 45-year-old woman presented to an outpatient chiropractic clinic with primary complaints of generalized low back pain, bilateral lower extremity paresthesias, and difficulty walking. An abnormal neurological examination result led to an initial working diagnosis of myelopathy of unknown cause. The patient was referred for a neurological consult.

RESULTS:   Computed tomography revealed severe multilevel degenerative spondylosis with diffuse ligamentous calcification, facet joint hypertrophy, and disk protrusion at T9-10 resulting in midthoracic cord compression. The patient underwent multilevel spinal decompressive surgery. Following surgical intervention, the patient reported symptom improvement.

CONCLUSION:   It is important to include a neurologic examination on all patients presenting with musculoskeletal complaints, regardless of prior medical attention. The ability to recognize myelopathy and localize the lesion to a specific spinal region by clinical examination may help prioritize diagnostic imaging decisions as well as facilitate diagnosis and treatment.

KEYWORDS:   Spinal stenosis; Thoracic vertebrae


From the FULL TEXT Article:

Introduction

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Manipulative and Rehabilitative Therapy as a Treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis Without Psychological Sequelae

By |October 10, 2014|Continuing Education, Scoliosis|

Manipulative and Rehabilitative Therapy as a Treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis Without Psychological Sequelae

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Chiropractic Medicine 2012 (Jun);   11 (2):   109–114

Jorge H. Villafañe, PT, MSc, PhD, Guillermo B. Silva, MSc, PhD, Andrea Dughera, MSc

Physical Therapist, Department of Physical Therapy,
Residenze Sanitarie Assistenziali
“A. Maritano,” Sangano, Italy.


OBJECTIVE:   The purpose of this case report is to describe management and outcomes of a patient with scoliosis.

CLINICAL FEATURES:   A 9-year-old female patient with a double curve pattern with Cobb angles of 18° and 24° (thoracic/thoracolumbar) compatible with scoliosis presented for physical therapy treatment.

INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME:   Physiotherapy treatment with a combination of manipulative and rehabilitation techniques was used. After finishing the treatment, the patient had Cobb angles of 7° and 11°, an improvement of 55% and 54%, respectively. After 6 months, these effects were maintained, as the patient had Cobb angles of 11° and 11°. The clinical appearance of the patient improved after the course of care. The patient was evaluated for psychological outcomes by applying the following tests: Scoliosis Research Society 22, Bad Sobernheim Stress, and the Brace Questionnaire The patient had the maximum score in all tests at the conclusion of therapy.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Scoliosis and Chiropractic Page

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Pulmonary Embolism in a Female Collegiate Cross-country Runner Presenting as Nonspecific Back Pain

By |October 9, 2014|Continuing Education, Pulmonary Embolism|

Pulmonary Embolism in a Female Collegiate Cross-country Runner Presenting as Nonspecific Back Pain

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Chiropractic Medicine 2012 (Sep);   11 (3):   215–220

Warren H. Landesberg, DC, DACBSP

Doctor of Chiropractic, Private Practice,
Briarcliff Manor, NY.


OBJECTIVE:   The purpose of this case report is to describe a female athlete with back and right scapular pain due to pulmonary embolism.

CLINICAL FEATURES:   A 20-year-old female collegiate cross-country runner presented to a chiropractic clinic with pain in the right scapular area that was severe, stabbing, and worsened with respiration. She had a cough and experienced difficulty lying on her right side. She had an elevated d-dimer. Chest radiograph demonstrated pleural effusion, prompting a thoracic computed tomographic angiogram that showed a large right lower lobe embolus and pulmonary infarct.

INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME:   The patient was hospitalized, prescribed anticoagulant therapy, and monitored for 6 months. She was able to return to competitive running 8 months later.

CONCLUSION:   This case raises awareness of the occurrence of birth control medication for the purpose of enhanced performance in female athletes and the associated risks of using this medication for enhanced performance.


From the FULL TEXT Article:

Introduction

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The Cellular and Molecular Biology of the Intervertebral Disc:A Clinician’s Primer

By |September 21, 2014|Continuing Education, Disc Injury|

The Cellular and Molecular Biology
of the Intervertebral Disc: A Clinician’s Primer

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Can Chiropr Assoc. 2014 (Sep);   58 (3):   246–257

W. Mark Erwin, DC, PhD and Katherine E. Hood, DC

Assistant Professor, Divisions of Neurological and Orthopaedic Surgery,
University of Toronto, Toronto Western Hospital;
Scientist, Toronto Western Research Institute;
Associate Professor, Research Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College.


Clinicians routinely encounter patients suffering from both degenerative and acute spinal pain, often as a consequence of pathology affecting the intervertebral disc (IVD). The IVD is a complex structure essential to spinal function and is subject to degenerative disease and injury. However, due to the complexity of spinal pain syndromes it is often difficult to determine the extent of the IVD’s contribution to the genesis of spinal pain. The location of the IVD is within close proximity to vital neural elements and may in the event of pathological change or injury compromise those structures. It is therefore important that clinicians performing manual therapy understand the cellular and molecular biology of the IVD as well as its clinical manifestation of degeneration/injury in order to safely manage and appreciate the role played by the disc in the development of mechanical spinal pain syndromes.

Keywords:   spine, degenerative, pain, disc, intervertebral


The Full-Text Article:

Introduction:

The intervertebral disc (IVD) is a complex structure positioned between two adjacent vertebrae where in addition to protecting the spinal cord and segmental spinal nerves it confers flexibility, multi-axial spinal motion and load transmission to the spine. The IVD is vulnerable to injury and degeneration often leading to pain syndromes however much remains to be discovered concerning the development of axial and radicular pain syndromes, the biology of the disc and the capacity of the IVD to repair itself after injury. [1] From the clinician’s perspective, familiarity with the biology of the IVD is vital in order to understand the natural history of disc-related injury/illness and to develop appropriate therapeutic strategies. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the salient characteristics of IVD pathology with a particular emphasis upon degenerative disease and its role in the generation of clinical spinal pain syndromes.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Disc Herniation and Chiropractic Page

The disc as an organ:

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