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Prevention and Health Promotion by Chiropractors

By |August 15, 2017|Health Promotion|

Prevention and Health Promotion by Chiropractors

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   American J Lifestyle Medicine 2008;   2 (6):   537–545

Daniel Redwood, DC, and Gary Globe, MBA, DC, PhD

Cleveland Chiropractic College–Kansas City,
10850 Lowell Avenue,
Overland Park, KS 66210


Chiropractic care includes a variety of minimally invasive approaches, with both treatment and prevention as essential elements of clinical practice. Although chiropractic adjustment (manipulation) is the signature therapy and best-known identifier of the profession, the practice of chiropractic involves more than manual therapeutics. In general, chiropractors seek to bring a holistic worldview to the doctor–patient encounter, seeking not only to relieve pain and restore neuromusculoskeletal function but also to support the inherent self-healing and self-regulating powers of the body.

Aside from applying their diagnostic training to the evaluation of a variety of physical disorders and delivering manual adjustments and related therapeutic interventions, many chiropractors encourage patients to take an active role in restoring and maintaining health, with particular emphasis on doctor-guided self-care through exercise and nutrition. In this review, the authors summarize the peer-reviewed literature on chiropractic and prevention, describe health promotion and wellness approaches currently taught at chiropractic colleges and used in chiropractic clinical settings, discuss duration of care, emphasize the importance of interprofessional cooperation and collaboration, and address the hypothesis that chiropractic adjustments yield preventive effects.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Health Promotion, Wellness and Chiropractic Page

(more…)

Community-based Free Clinics

By |May 5, 2016|Health Promotion|

Community-based Free Clinics: Opportunities for Interprofessional Collaboration, Health Promotion, and Complex Care Management

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Chiropractic Education 2016 (Mar); 30 (1): 25-29

Martha A. Kaeser , MEd, DC, Cheryl Hawk , DC, PhD,
Michelle L. Anderson , Richard Reinhardt DC

Logan University
1851 Schoettler Rd,
Chesterfield, MO, 63017


Objective:   Free or outreach clinics offer students the opportunity to work with diverse patient populations. The objective of this study was to describe the demographics and clinical characteristics of a sample of chiropractic patients at a free community-based clinic to assess clinical and educational opportunities for students to work with diverse populations, collaborate with other professions and practice health promotion through patient education.

Methods:   This was a prospective, descriptive cross-sectional study conducted over 2 months. Data on demographics, health status, and health risks were collected from patients and their interns.

Results:   Of the 158 patients, 50.6% were women and 50.6% African-American, while only 20.9% were employed full-time. Of the 24.7% tobacco users, 48.7% expressed interest in cessation. Of 80.0% overweight or obese patients, 48.8% expressed interest in weight loss. By self-report, 16.5% were diabetic, 10.1% took hypertension medication, 36.7% used prescription pain medication (9.4% opiate use), 33.5% used nonprescription pain medication, and 9.4% were under the care of a mental health professional.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Health Promotion & Wellness Page

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Coenzyme Q10: A Building Block of Healthy Aging

By |June 27, 2013|Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Health Promotion, Nutrition|

Coenzyme Q10: A Building Block of Healthy Aging

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic

By Holly Lucille, ND, RN


Supporting biologic activity as we age with ubiquinol, the active form of CoQ10.

Coenzyme Q10 has gained enormous attention in recent years, and with good reason — it’s the Energizer Bunny of the cellular world.

This essential quinine molecule is found in the mitochondria of every single cell in the body, where it plays a key role in energy production. CoQ10 not only assists in the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), but also scavenges free radicals. [1]   To carry out these critical tasks, mitochondrial CoQ10 continuously cycles from ubiquinone, its ATP production state, to ubiquinol, its reduced active state. [2]

More than 4,000 published studies suggest that high CoQ10 levels are essential for optimal health — and this is especially true for the heart and brain. Since both of these organs require huge amounts of energy, supplementation can often help support their high biologic activity. [2, 3]   Research shows that CoQ10 supplementation can improve energy production and extend cell life by enhancing cellular mitochondrial levels of CoQ10. In turn, this supports not only the heart and brain, but also periodontal, skin, reproductive, and immune health. [4-9]   However, before you advise patients to add CoQ10 to their daily routine, be aware that there’s a catch to taking this multitalented nutrient in supplemental form.

CoQ10’s Critical Conversion

Creating ATP inside the mitochondria is quite complicated and involves a series of biochemical reactions. Since the body cannot store ATP, this multi-step process — known as the electron transport chain — ensures that this critical energy source is continually replaced. [1, 10]   Here’s how it works: Ubiquinone contributes to ATP production by passing electrons from one enzyme complex to another, much like a bucket brigade. [3]   During this process, ubiquinone is converted to its reduced active state, ubiquinol.

Surprisingly, our mitochondria are the most important cellular source of free radicals. [11]   While most of the oxygen radicals generated by the mitochondria stay with its membrane folds, about 2 percent “escape” and create toxins that can threaten the health and survival of the entire cell. [11-13]   Ubiquinol is able to neutralize these free radicals, both within the mitochondria and the cell membrane itself. [14]

There are many more articles like this @ our:

Coenzyme – Q10 (Co–Q10) Page

which is just one page from our

Nutrition Section

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Clinical Disorders and the Sensory System

By |April 11, 2013|Chiropractic Education, Diagnosis, Education, Evaluation & Management, General Health, Health Promotion, Neurology, Orthopedic Tests, Radiculopathy, Spinal Manipulation|

Clinical Disorders and the Sensory System

The Chiro.Org Blog


We would all like to thank Dr. Richard C. Schafer, DC, PhD, FICC for his lifetime commitment to the profession. In the future we will continue to add materials from RC’s copyrighted books for your use.

This is Chapter 4 from RC’s best-selling book:

“Basic Principles of Chiropractic Neuroscience”

These materials are provided as a service to our profession. There is no charge for individuals to copy and file these materials. However, they cannot be sold or used in any group or commercial venture without written permission from ACAPress.


Chapter 8: Clinical Disorders and the Sensory System

This chapter describes those sensory mechanisms, joint signals, and abnormal sensations (eg, pain, thermal abnormalities) that have particular significance within clinical diagnosis. The basis and differentiation of pain are described, as are the related subjects of trigger points and paresthesia. The chapter concludes with a description of the neurologic basis for the evaluation of the sensory system and the sensory fibers of the cranial nerves.


     THE ANALYSIS OF PAIN
     IN THE CLINICAL SETTING


Although all pain does not have organic causes, there is no such thing as “imagined” pain. Pain that can be purely isolated as a structural, functional, or an emotional effect is rare. More likely, all three are superimposed upon and interlaced with each other in various degrees of status. This is also true for neural, vascular, lymphatic, and hormonal mechanisms.

Common Causes of Pain and Paresthesia

The common causes of pain and paresthesia are:

(1) obvious direct trauma or injury;

(2) reflex origins in musculoskeletal lesions, which deep pressure often exaggerates, such as trigger areas;

(3) peripheral nerve injury (eg, causalgia), which results in an intense burning superficial pain;

(4) the presence of nerve inflammations and degeneration of the peripheral or CNS, which frequently cause other changes indicative of such lesions; (more…)

The Horizontal Neurologic Levels

By |April 8, 2013|Chiropractic Care, Chiropractic Education, Clinical Decision-making, Diagnosis, Education, Evaluation & Management, Health Promotion, Neurology|

The Horizontal Neurologic Levels

The Chiro.Org Blog


We would all like to thank Dr. Richard C. Schafer, DC, PhD, FICC for his lifetime commitment to the profession. In the future we will continue to add materials from RC’s copyrighted books for your use.

This is Chapter 4 from RC’s best-selling book:

“Basic Principles of Chiropractic Neuroscience”

These materials are provided as a service to our profession. There is no charge for individuals to copy and file these materials. However, they cannot be sold or used in any group or commercial venture without written permission from ACAPress.


Chapter 4: The Horizontal Neurologic Levels
and Related Clinical Concerns


This chapter describes the basic functional anatomy and clinical considerations of the horizontal aspects of the supratentorial, posterior fossa, spinal, and peripheral levels of the nervous system.


     OVERVIEW


The reader should keep in mind that the various aspects of the nervous system as described in this manual (eg, longitudinal and horizontal systems) are only reference guides that are visualizations of a patient’s nervous system in the upright position. They can be likened to the lines of longitude and latitude on a globe of the earth.

Such systems do not exist physically, but they do serve as excellent mental grid-like tools (viewpoints) during localization and areas in which and from which relationships can be described. For example, although the longitudinal systems take a general vertical course within the spinal column there are numerous alterations and they actually become horizontal when decussating. While the horizontal levels are spatially placed in and extend from the CNS in a general segmental manner, they soon take a widely diffuse course as they project toward their destinations. Thus, references to longitudinal and horizontal levels are just general viewpoints.

It is helpful for study purposes to isolate the body into certain systems, as described above, organize systems into organs, organs into tissues, tissues into cells, and cells into their components. However, we should keep in mind that, physically and functionally, there is only one integrated body and it is more than the sum of its parts. And even the body cannot be thought of as truly separate from its external environment. Although we may do this for study purposes, it is a limited viewpoint.

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When Research Challenges Our Assumptions

By |September 8, 2012|Chiropractic Care, Evidence-based Medicine, Guidelines, Health Care Reform, Health Promotion|

When Research Challenges Our Assumptions

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   ACA News ~ Sept 2012

By Daniel Redwood


When new research, research reviews or practice guidelines support our current beliefs and practices, enthusiasm comes easily. When the 2007 medical practice guidelines on low back pain (LBP) jointly prepared by the American Pain Society and the American College of Physicians recognized spinal manipulation as the only non-pharmacologic method providing “proven benefits” for acute LBP and as one of several methods (including exercise, rehabilitation, acupuncture and yoga) proven effective for chronic LBP, the American Chiropractic Association and doctors of chiropractic (DCs) everywhere welcomed this as a long-overdue recognition of the value of our primary treatment methods.

But when research challenges our assumptions, our responses are understandably mixed. Such findings, if confirmed in multiple studies, may create pressure to change our practice patterns or threaten reimbursement from insurance companies. Like members of other health professions, DCs do not find such developments pleasant. How we and members of other health professions respond to such research says a great deal about who we are, how fully we practice what we preach, and the depth of our commitment to providing the best possible care to our patients. (more…)