Chiro.org - Chiropractic Resource Organization.     Support Chiropractic Research!

News

Home/News

A Giant in Chiropractic Radiology: Remembering Dr. Lindsay Rowe (1956-2016)

By |March 23, 2016|News|

Source Dynamic Chiropractic

By Deborah Pate, DC, DACBR

Lindsay Rowe, DC, MD, DACBR, was a giant in the field of chiropractic radiology who enjoyed careers as a chiropractor, medical doctor, radiologist and educator.

A distinguished international lecturer and author, he wrote more than 50 scientific papers and numerous book chapters; and together with Dr. Terry Yochum, co-authored the internationally respected text Essentials of Skeletal Radiology, now in its third edition. It is the standard text in most chiropractic colleges and has been enthusiastically reviewed in scientific journals such as The New England Journal of Medicine and Radiology.

Dr. Rowe earned his chiropractic degree (MAppSc – Chiropractic) with honors from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Australia. He subsequently practiced chiropractic and later earned board certification in chiropractic radiology at a time when few chiropractors entered into the specialty. He chaired the Department of Radiology at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College in Toronto, Ontario. Later, he held the same position at Northwestern College of Chiropractic in Minneapolis, Minn.

Dr. Rowe received a medical degree from the University of Newcastle, Australia, followed by residencies in emergency medicine and diagnostic and interventional radiology at the same institution. He was associate professor at the University of Newcastle, an adjunct professor at Northwestern Health Sciences University and Murdoch University, staff radiologist at the Center for Diagnostic Imaging (a national medical imaging network) and John Hunter Hospital in Melbourne. He was also a prolific presenter at professional meetings in Australia and many countries around the world.

Dr. Rowe’s accomplishments in skeletal radiology have contributed much to the advancement of chiropractic’s acceptance in the medical community, especially chiropractic radiology. He was a leader and a trailblazer, bridging the gap between allopathic and chiropractic; creating respect for our profession within the modern health care community.

Year End Review

By |December 31, 2015|News|

“Americans’ Perceptions of Chiropractic”

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   A Chiro.Org Editorial


As 2015 draws to a close, let’s review one of the most interesting events of the year.

As tweeted by researcher Dr. Dana Lawrence on September 8th:

Gallup and Palmer College release first-ever national survey on Americans’ perception of chiropractic.


I am highlighting this Gallup survey for several reasons. The main reason is because we have so many different sources to draw from. I was particularly excited by the Palmer Homecoming presentation from Gallup researcher Cynthia English and the Dynamic Chiropractic webinar discussion by Dennis Marchiori, D.C., Ph.D. and William Meeker, D.C., M.P.H.

I hope you will find the following interviews as exciting as I did.


September 8th was when JMPT pre-published the article:

Public Perceptions of Doctors of Chiropractic


Gallup also released their own press release on the study on September 8th:

Majority in U.S. Say Chiropractic Works for Neck, Back Pain


You will also enjoy this fascinating Palmer Homecoming presentation from Gallup researcher Cynthia English about the gathering and meaning of the data they collected.

Gallup-Palmer Presentation from Palmer College of Chiropractic on Vimeo.


According to NewsUSA – Far more adults than anyone thought are seeking help from chiropractors, according to a new nationwide Gallup report.


The complete report “Americans’ Perceptions of Chiropractic
is available for your review.


(more…)

Chiropractic:   Profession or Modality?

By |December 28, 2015|News|

Chiropractic:   Profession or Modality?

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic ~ December 15, 2015


AND FROM:   HuffPost ~ 11-19-2015


Are you a thing or are you a human?

If someone wishes to assess your potential contributions to this life we live, what is the best starting assumption: thing or human?

The questions may seem silly. But a recent report from the RAND Corporation bores in on how regular medicine reduced complementary and alternative medicine professionals to “thing” status — as “modalities” — in the first years of the integrative medicine era.

The title of the report is “Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Professions or Modalities?”.  The discussions among policy makers, practitioners and delivery system leaders synthesized in the 75-page document beg a more significant question: Does the emergence of values-based medicine urge a major re-think regarding the potential contributions of these professionals?

The case statement by RAND’s Patricia Herman, ND, PhD and Ian Coulter, PhD begins with a blunt irony. “One of the hallmarks of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is treatment of the whole person.” Yet in the fee-for-service procedure and production orientation of the medical industry, licensed practitioners of chiropractic, acupuncture and Oriental medicine, and naturopathic medicine were typically stripped of this core value — treating the whole person — before being put to any use.

Read More Now

New RAND report examines the policy implications.

Dynamic Chiropractic ~ December 15, 2015


Is chiropractic a profession or a modality?

That’s the thought-provoking question explored in a new RAND report funded by the NCMIC Foundation.

“Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Professions or Modalities?”   focuses on

“a problem that confronts the complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) professions whereby a profession is defined politically not by its full professional scope but by its treatment modalities.”

Authored by Patricia Herman, ND, PhD, and Ian Coulter, PhD, the RAND report highlights chiropractic and four other major CAM disciplines:   acupuncture and Oriental medicine, massage therapy and naturopathic medicine, examining how the “profession vs. modalities” issue affects “policy implications for coverage, licensure, scope of practice, institutional privileges, and research.”

(more…)

World Spine Day – October 16th, 2015

By |October 9, 2015|News|

WSD-Logo-Hor

World Spine Day is a part of the Bone and Joint Decade Action Week which occurs each year in October. The 16th of October is the day dedicated as World Spine Day.

The theme “Straighten Up and Move” was introduced in 2012 and emphasized the importance of healthy spinal posture and activity which promote body awareness and minimizes the day-to-day wear and tear on a person’s spine. The theme of posture and movement supports the BJD’s Vision of “Keep People Moving”. The intent of WSD is to bring people from all walks of life – patients, health providers, health care organizations, associations and governments to help ease this global burden.

The aims of WSD:

  1. Raise awareness about spinal health and spine disorders within the interdisciplinary health care community and amongst public policy decision-makers and the general public;
  2. To provide an opportunity for and encourage ongoing discussion about the burden of spinal disorders; and
  3. To promote an interdisciplinary, collaborative approach to easing the burden of spinal disorders.

WSD Theme 2015- “Your Back at Work”

In 2015 a new theme is being introduced for WSD- “Your Back at Work”.  It is anticipated that this theme will continue for the next 2-3 years, building on the “Straighten Up and Move” theme.

Prevention, education and management of spine disorders in the workplace are of utmost importance and this year’s theme provides an important opportunity to highlight the importance of global, regional and local initiatives to address the burden of MSK disorders in the workplace.

World Spine Day Toolkit

Chiropractic Physicians Call for Conservative Treatments for Pain Management Amid Prescription Painkiller Epidemic

By |August 20, 2015|News|

Source American Chiropractic Association

American Chiropractic Association launches 2015 public awareness campaign aimed at curbing opioid overuse and abuse

During National Chiropractic Health Month (NCHM) in October, the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) will work with thousands of doctors of chiropractic (DCs), chiropractic assistants (CAs) and chiropractic doctoral students nationwide to bring attention to the public health crisis caused by pain, and in particular the overuse of prescription painkillers, with this year’s theme #PainFreeNation. The campaign is part of the profession’s ongoing efforts to educate the public about the value of exhaustingconservative forms of care for both acute and chronic pain before resorting to higher risk options, such as opioids.

“Opioid medications involve the risk of overuse and addiction. Beyond the risks of overuse and addiction, prescription drugs that numb pain may convince a patient that a musculoskeletal condition is less severe than it is, or that it has healed. This misunderstanding can lead to overexertion and a delay in the healing process or even to permanent injury,” said ACA President Anthony Hamm, DC.

President Hamm noted that people in pain should be informed of all management strategies, including non-drug approaches such as chiropractic, to reduce their risk of overuse and addiction.

Each patient is unique, and care plans should be tailored to focus on what is the safest, most effective treatment for the individual. Chiropractic physicians stand ready to work together with medical physicians to help address this epidemic that has caused unnecessary suffering, enormous loss of human potential and massive financial and personal costs,” he added.

Fortunately, health care quality organizations have begun to recognize the value of this conservative, multidisciplinary approach. Earlier this year, the Joint Commission, which certifies more than 20,000 health care organizations and programs in the United States, including every major hospital, revised its pain management standard to include chiropractic services and acupuncture. Clinical experts in pain management who provide input to the commission’s standards affirmed that treatment strategies may consider both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches.   

 

During NCHM this fall, ACA will offer chiropractic physicians resources to help them share information about their conservative approach and why it is especially significant to today’s health care consumers amidst the opioid epidemic.

Q&A With the First VA Chiropractic Residents

By |June 29, 2015|News, Veterans|

Q&A With the First VA Chiropractic Residents

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic ~ July 1, 2015 ~ FULL TEXT

By Clinton Daniels, DC, MS, Amanda Dluzneiwski, DC, Derek Golley, DC,
Benjamin Liang, DC and Rachel Perrucci, DC


The Inaugural class of 2015 shares their residency experiences.


As you may have read previously, a major step forward for the profession occurred in July 2014 when the Department of Veterans Affairs began piloting a chiropractic residency program at five locations.1-2 This program is the result of years of dedication and strategic planning by the VA chiropractic leadership, and is congruent with the VA’s mission to train providers to serve the VA and the nation at large.

As the inaugural class, we are honored to have participated in the first phase of the three-year pilot program.

In March 2015, we had the opportunity to gather for a VA meeting held in advance of the Association of Chiropractic Colleges /Research Agenda Conference in Las Vegas. At this meeting, we worked with representatives from VA Central Office, the five residency program directors, and representatives from each program’s academic affiliates: Logan University, New York Chiropractic College, Southern California University of Health Sciences and the University of Bridgeport.

After this, many of us attended the ACC/RAC conference itself, where we participated in workshops and observed several cutting-edge research presentations. In our interaction with many of the ACC/RAC attendees, we noted a tremendous amount of interest in the VA Chiropractic Residency Program. We received questions ranging from inquiries about our future career plans to how perspective residents may apply. The following are some of the most frequent questions we fielded, as well as personal residency experiences.


How long is the residency program and is it a paid position?

(more…)