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Introduction to Chiropractic Physiologic Therapeutics

By |November 10, 2012|Chiropractic Care, Diagnosis, Education, Physical Therapy|

Introduction to Chiropractic Physiologic Therapeutics

The Chiro.Org Blog


We would all like to thank Dr. Richard C. Schafer, DC, PhD, FICC for his lifetime commitment to the profession. In the future we will continue to add materials from RC’s copyrighted books for your use.

This is Chapter 10 from RC’s best-selling book:

“Basic Chiropractic Procedural Manual”

These materials are provided as a service to our profession. There is no charge for individuals to copy and file these materials. However, they cannot be sold or used in any group or commercial venture without written permission from ACAPress.


Chapter 10: Introduction to Chiropractic Physiologic Therapeutics

The use of physiotherapy and physical therapy to enhance the effects of the chiropractic adjustment in treatment can be significant in many cases. Superficial heat, diathermy, cold, microwaves, ultrasound, ultraviolet rays, galvanic and sinusoidal currents, traction, hydrotherapy, or therapeutic massage and exercise are among the therapies that may benefit the patient when properly applied. These procedures may help to reduce stiffness in joints, relieve tension, relax muscle spasm, and offer many other physiologic benefits.

Special precautions, however, must be observed when treating patients of advanced age. Special consideration must also be given to indications and contraindications, patient sensitivity, intensity, and duration of treatment.

Special caution must be used with patients that have heart and blood pressure problems, renal failure, diminished sensation or circulation, or an inability to tolerate heat or cold. For example, patients with Raynaud’s disease do not tolerate cold. Patients with other circulatory problems do not tolerate thermotherapy because they have less ability to dissipate the heat. Patients with a distinct loss of sensation will not realize if an area is being overheated or even being burned.

A patient’s tolerance cannot be the only guide to intensities and duration of treatment. Frequent checking, both visually for redness and by palpation to determine over heating, must be done during the treatment period. Reasonable examination, monitoring, and care by the doctor can avoid problems in most instances.


INTRODUCTION

Physiotherapy techniques are frequently used preparatory to the chiropractic adjustment to improve function, relieve spasm, minimize pain, and enhance circulation and drainage. They are often used before primary care to relax the patient and condition tissues, and posttherapy to relive pain and prevent deformities resulting from trauma or disease and to maintain what has been gained in treatment. There are also times when it may be considered primary therapy. Rehabilitation objectives are shown in Table 10.1. (more…)

A Basic Rehabilitative Template

By |May 24, 2012|Chiropractic Care, Clinical Decision-making, Diagnosis, Evaluation & Management, Evidence-based Medicine, Nutrition, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation|

A Basic Rehabilitative Template

The Chiro.Org Blog


Clinical Monograph 1

By R. C. Schafer, DC, PhD, FICC


INTRODUCTION

Injuries can be classified into 13 types: abrasions, contusions, strains, ruptures, sprains, subluxations, dislocations, fractures, incisions, lacerations, penetrations, perforations, and punctures. This paper will not detail the management of burns or injuries requiring referral for operative correction, suturing, or restricted chemotherapy.

Objectives

Except for the most minor injuries, traumatized neuromusculoskeletal tissues are benefited by alert restorative procedures. The more serious the injury, the more prolonged is and the greater the need for professionally guided rehabilitation. The first step in rehabilitation is to explain to the patient that rehabilitation is just as important as the initial care of the injury. The goal is not only to restore the injured part to normal activity or as near normal as possible in the shortest possible time but also to prevent posttraumatic deterioration. It is an individualized process that requires patient dedication. The author recognizes that it is easier to write about comprehensive planning than to motivate some patients to follow prescriptions after pain has subsided.

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Chiropractic Rehabilitation

Most authorities would agree with Harrelson when he lists the goals of rehabilitation as:

  1. decreased pain;
  2. decreased inflammatory response to trauma;
  3. return of full pain-free active joint ROM;
  4. decreased effusion;
  5. return of muscle strength, power, and endurance; and
  6. regain of full asymptomatic functional activities at the preinjury level (or better).

(more…)

New LBP Study Reveals Chiropractic Is Superior to PT and MD Care

By |March 17, 2011|Low Back Pain, Physical Therapy, Research|

New LBP Study Reveals Chiropractic Is Superior to PT and MD Care

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Occupational and Enviro Medicine 2011 (Mar 14)

Cifuentes M, Willetts J, Wasiak R.

The Center for Disability Research at the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety


This study is unique in that it was conducted by the Center for Disability Research at the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety and the University of Massachusetts Lowell, Hopkinton, Mass; and the Center for Health Economics & Science Policy at United BioSource Corporation, London, United Kingdom.

Their objective was to compare the occurrences of repeated disability episodes between types of health care providers, who treat claimants with new episodes of work-related low back pain (LBP). They followed 894 patients over 1-year, using workers’ compensation claims data.

By controlling for demographics and severity, they determined the hazard ratio (HR) for disability recurrence between 3 types of providers:
Physical Therapists (PT),
Physicians (MD), and
Chiropractors (DC).

The results are quite interesting: (more…)

Sports Management: Physiologic Therapeutics in Sports

By |October 17, 2009|Chiropractic Technique, Diagnosis, Education, Physical Therapy, Sports|

Sports Management:
Physiologic Therapeutics in Sports

The Chiro.Org Blog


We would all like to thank Dr. Richard C. Schafer, DC, PhD, FICC for his lifetime commitment to the profession. In the future we will continue to add materials from RC’s copyrighted books for your use.

This is Chapter 13 from RC’s best-selling book:

“Chiropractic Management of Sports and Recreational Injuries”

Second Edition ~ Wiliams & Wilkins

These materials are provided as a service to our profession. There is no charge for individuals to copy and file these materials. However, they cannot be sold or used in any group or commercial venture without written permission from ACAPress.


Chapter 13:   PHYSIOLOGIC THERAPEUTICS IN SPORTS

Chiropractic physiologic therapeutics is defined by the ACA Council on Physiotherapy as the application of forces and substances that induce a physiologic response and use and/or allow the body’s natural processes to return to a more normal state of health.

This section is not intended to be instructional in specific modality application, but rather to bring to attention commonly utilized procedures and their rationale within the management of sports injuries. For this reason, emphasis will be on application-rationale within athletics, indications, and contraindications, rather than technique.

Physiologic Therapeutics

Physiologic therapeutics make use of the therapeutic effects of mechanotherapy, hydrotherapy, electrotherapy, light, heat, cold, air, soft-tissue manipulation, and massage. The rational application of these natural forces requires a knowledge of the actions and effects on pathophysiologic processes.

The use of physiotherapy to facilitate basic chiropractic care has been popular within the profession since the turn of the century. However, any therapeutic agent possesses a potential for effectiveness and a potential for danger. Each modality has its indications and contraindications, and certain precautions must be observed if the modality is to be applied safely and effectively in line with the biophysics and physiologic responses involved. (more…)

The Rationale of Physiotherapy in Chiropractic

By |September 19, 2009|Chiropractic Care, Diagnosis, Education, Physical Therapy|

The Rationale of Physiotherapy in Chiropractic

The Chiro.Org Blog


We would all like to thank Dr. Richard C. Schafer, DC, PhD, FICC for his lifetime commitment to the profession. In the future we will continue to add materials from RC’s copyrighted books for your use.

This is Chapter 1 from RC’s best-selling book:

“Applied Physiotherapy in Chiropractic”

These materials are provided as a service to our profession. There is no charge for individuals to copy and file these materials. However, they cannot be sold or used in any group or commercial venture without written permission from ACAPress.


Chapter 1:   The Rationale of Physiotherapy in Chiropractic

The effects of electric current on the body have stimulated profound excitement in the field of physiologic therapeutics. Becker’s text, Body Electric, [1] clearly elucidates the effects that electric stimulation can have on the body. His work and that of others have flamed interest in types of modalities that might even duplicate the body’s intrinsic electric currents. Picker demonstrated that microcurrent stimuli could increase ATP production, increase protein syntheses, and impact positively on membrane transport. [2] Along with this new emphasis on duplicating the body’s energies, the chiropractic profession holds a great interest in rehabilitating the injured patient. Recent advances in electrotherapeutics such as the arrival of Russian stimulation and advanced technology in rehabilitation equipment have further nurtured this concern.

It is hoped that practitioners will use adjunctive procedures as a part of a holistic approach to total case management. Emphasis should be on those therapies duplicating the body’s natural responses, those that alleviate symptoms, and those that aid in restoring normal functions of the body.


INTRODUCTION


(more…)