Chiro.org - Chiropractic Resource Organization.     Support Chiropractic Research!

Spinal Joint Pain

Home/Spinal Joint Pain

Elevated Production of Nociceptive CC-chemokines and sE-selectin in Patients with Low Back Pain and the Effects of Spinal Manipulation: A Non-randomized Clinical Trial

By |April 22, 2017|Low Back Pain, Spinal Joint Pain|

Elevated Production of Nociceptive CC-chemokines and sE-selectin in Patients with Low Back Pain and the Effects of Spinal Manipulation: A Non-randomized Clinical Trial

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Clin J Pain. 2017 (Apr 19) [Epub]

Julita A. Teodorczyk-Injeyan, PhD,
Marion McGregor, PhD, DC,
John J. Triano, DC, PhD,
H. Stephen Injeyan, PhD, DC

Graduate Education and Research Programs,
Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College,
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


BACKGROUND:   The involvement of inflammatory components in the pathophysiology of low back pain is poorly understood. It has been suggested that spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) may exert anti-inflammatory effects.

PURPOSE:   To determine the involvement of inflammation-associated chemokines (CC series) in the pathogenesis of non-specific low back pain and to evaluate the effect of SMT on that process.

METHODS:   Patients presenting with non-radicular, non-specific low back pain (minimum pain score 3 on 10 point visual analogue scale, VAS) were recruited according to stringent inclusion criteria. They were evaluated for appropriateness to treat using a high velocity low amplitude manipulative thrust (HVLT) in the lumbar-lumbosacral region. Blood samples were obtained at baseline and following the administration of a series of 6 HVLTs on alternate days over the period of two weeks. The in vitro levels of CC chemokines (CCL2, CCL3 and CCL4) production and plasma levels of an inflammatory biomarker, soluble E-selectin, were determined at baseline and at the termination of treatments two weeks later.

RESULTS:   Compared with asymptomatic controls baseline production of all chemokines was significantly elevated in acute (P=0.004 – <0.0001), and that of CCL2 and CCL4 in chronic LBP patients (P<0.0001). Furthermore, CCL4 production was significantly higher (P<0.0001) in the acute versus chronic LBP group. sE-selectin levels were significantly higher (P=0.003) in chronic but not in acute LBP patients. Following SMT, patient reported outcomes showed significant (P<0.0001) improvements in VAS and ODI scores. This was accompanied by a significant decline in CCL 3 production (P<0.0001) in both groups of patients. Change scores for CCL4 production differed significantly (P<0.0001) only for the acute LBP cohort, and no effect on the production of CCL2 or plasma sE-selectin levels was noted in either group.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Low Back Pain and Chiropractic Page and the:

Chiropractic and Spinal Pain Management

(more…)

Spinal Pain in Danish School Children –
How Often and How Long?

By |April 7, 2017|Pediatrics, Spinal Joint Pain|

Spinal Pain in Danish School Children –
How Often and How Long? The CHAMPS Study-DK

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2017 (Mar 27); 18 (1): 67

Kristina Boe Dissing, Lise Hestbæk, Jan Hartvigsen,
Christopher Williams, Steven Kamper, Eleanor Boyle,
and Niels Wedderkopp

Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics,
Faculty of Health Sciences,
University of Southern Denmark,
Campusvej 55, DK-5230, Odense M, Denmark.


BACKGROUND:   Spinal pain in children and adolescents is a common condition, usually transitory, but the picture of spinal pain still needs elucidation, mainly due to variation in measurement methods. The aim of this study was to describe the occurrence of spinal pain in 8-15 year-old Danish school children, over a 3-year period. Specifically determining the characteristics of spinal pain in terms of frequency and duration.

METHODS:   The study was a 3-year prospective longitudinal cohort study including 1,400 school children. The outcomes were based on weekly text messages (SMS) to the parents inquiring about the child’s musculoskeletal pain, and on clinical data from examinations of the children.

RESULTS:   The 3-year prevalence was 55%. The prevalence was 29%, 33% and 31% for each of the three study years respectively, and increased statistically significantly with age, especially for lumbopelvic pain. Most children had few and short-lasting episodes with spinal pain, but more than one out of five children had three or more episodes during a study year and 17% of all episodes lasted for more than 4 weeks.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Pediatrics Section

(more…)

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use by Children with Pain in the United States

By |March 28, 2017|Pediatrics, Spinal Joint Pain|

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use by Children with Pain in the United States

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Acad Pediatr. 2017 (Feb 20).  pii: S1876-2859(17)30063-3

Cornelius B. Groenewald, MBChB, Sarah E. Beals-Erickson, PhD, Jaime Ralston-Wilson, DAOM, LAc, Jennifer A. Rabbitts, MB, ChB, Tonya M. Palermo, PhD

Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine,
University of Washington School of Medicine and Seattle Children’s Hospital.
M/S MB.11.500, 4800 Sand Point Way NE,
Seattle, WA 98105, USA.


OBJECTIVE:   Chronic pain is reported by 15-25% of children. Growing evidence from clinical samples suggests that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies are desired by families and may benefit some children with pain conditions. The objective of this study is to provide estimates of CAM use by children with pain in the United States.

METHODS:   We analyzed data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to estimate patterns, predictors, and perceived benefits of CAM use among children 4-17 years of age with and without painful conditions in the US. We used χ2 tests to compare the prevalence rates of CAM use among children with pain to CAM use among children without pain. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with CAM use within the group of children with pain conditions.

RESULTS:   Parents reported that 26.6% of children had pain conditions (e.g. headache, abdominal, musculoskeletal pain) in the past year; of these children, 21.3% used CAM. In contrast only 8.1% of children without pain conditions used CAM (χ2: p< .001). CAM use among children with pain was associated with female sex (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=1.49, p=0.005), higher income (aOR=1.61, p=0.027), and presence of 4+ comorbidities (aOR=2.01, p=0.013). Among children with pain who used CAM the 2 most commonly used CAM modalities were biologically-based therapies (47.3%) (e.g., special diets and herbal supplements) and manipulative or body-based therapies (46.3%) (e.g., chiropractic and massage).

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Pediatrics Page and the:

Chiropractic and Spinal Pain Page

(more…)

Prevalence and Tracking of Back Pain
From Childhood to Adolescence

By |May 17, 2016|Pediatrics, Spinal Joint Pain|

Prevalence and Tracking of Back Pain
From Childhood to Adolescence

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:  

Per Kjaer, Niels Wedderkopp, Lars Korsholm
and Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde

Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics,
Part of Clinical Locomotion Network,
University of Southern Denmark,
Campusvej 55, DK-5230, Odense, Denmark.


BACKGROUND:   It is generally acknowledged that back pain (BP) is a common condition already in childhood. However, the development until early adulthood is not well understood and, in particular, not the individual tracking pattern. The objectives of this paper are to show the prevalence estimates of BP, low back pain (LBP), mid back pain (MBP), neck pain (NP), and care-seeking because of BP at three different ages (9, 13 and 15 years) and how the BP reporting tracks over these age groups over three consecutive surveys.

METHODS:   A longitudinal cohort study was carried out from the years of 1997 till 2005, collecting interview data from children who were sampled to be representative of Danish schoolchildren. BP was defined overall and specifically in the three spinal regions as having reported pain within the past month. The prevalence estimates and the various patterns of BP reporting over time are presented as percentages.

RESULTS:   Of the 771 children sampled, 62%, 57%, and 58% participated in the three back surveys and 34% participated in all three. The prevalence estimates for children at the ages of 9, 13, and 15, respectively, were for BP 33%, 28%, and 48%; for LBP 4%, 22%, and 36%; for MBP 20%, 13%, and 35%; and for NP 10%, 7%, and 15%. Seeking care for BP increased from 6% and 8% at the two youngest ages to 34% at the oldest. Only 7% of the children who participated in all three surveys reported BP each time and 30% of these always reported no pain. The patterns of development differed for the three spinal regions and between genders. Status at the previous survey predicted status at the next survey, so that those who had pain before were more likely to report pain again and vice versa. This was most pronounced for care-seeking.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic Pediatrics Section

(more…)

Pain Characteristics of Adolescent Spinal Pain

By |December 4, 2015|Pediatrics, Spinal Joint Pain|

Pain Characteristics of Adolescent Spinal Pain

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   BMC Pediatr. 2015 (Apr 17);   15 (1):   42 ~ FULL TEXT

Brigitte Wirth and B Kim Humphreys

Institute of Human Movement Sciences and Sport,
ETH Zurich, Wolfgang Pauli Str. 27,
Zurich, 8093, Switzerland


BACKGROUND:   Although adolescent spinal pain increases the risk for chronic back pain in adulthood, most adolescents can be regarded as healthy. The aim of the present study was to provide data on localization, intensity and frequency of adolescent spinal pain and to investigate which physical and psycho-social parameters predict these pain characteristics.

METHOD:   On the occasion of Spine Day, an annual event where children and adolescents are examined by chiropractors on a voluntary basis for back problems, 412 adolescents (10 to 16 years) were tested (by questionnaire and physical examination). Pain characteristics (localization, intensity, and frequency) were identified and evaluated using descriptive statistics. Regression analyses were performed to investigate possible influencing psycho-social and physical influence factors.

RESULTS:   Adolescents who suffered from pain in more than one spinal area reported higher pain intensity and frequency than those with pain in only one spinal area. Sleep disorders were a significant predictor for pain in more than one spinal area (p < 0.01) as well as a trend for frequent pain (p = 0.06). Adolescents with frequent pain showed impaired balance on one leg standing with closed eyes (p = 0.02).

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic and Pain Page and the:

Chiropractic Pediatrics Page

(more…)

Spinal Pain in Adolescents

By |February 2, 2015|Pediatrics, Spinal Joint Pain, Spinal Manipulation|

Spinal Pain in Adolescents: Prevalence, Incidence, and Course: A School-based Two-year Prospective Cohort Study in 1,300 Danes Aged 11-13

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2014 (May 29);   15:   187 ~ FULL TEXT

Ellen Aartun, Jan Hartvigsen, Niels Wedderkopp,
and Lise Hestbaek

Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics,
University of Southern Denmark,
Odense, Denmark


BACKGROUND:   The severity and course of spinal pain is poorly understood in adolescents. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and two-year incidence, as well as the course, frequency, and intensity of pain in the neck, mid back, and low back (spinal pain).

METHODS:   This study was a school-based prospective cohort study. All 5th and 6th grade students (11-13 years) at 14 schools in the Region of Southern Denmark were invited to participate (N=1,348). Data were collected in 2010 and again two years later, using an e-survey completed during school time.

RESULTS:   The lifetime prevalence of spinal pain was 86% and 89% at baseline and follow-up, respectively. A group of 13.6% (95% CI: 11.8, 15.6) at baseline and 19.5% (95% CI: 17.1, 22.0) at follow-up reported that they had pain frequently. The frequency of pain was strongly associated with the intensity of pain, i.e., the majority of the participants reported their pain as relatively infrequent and of low intensity, whereas the participants with frequent pain also experienced pain of higher intensity. The two-year incidence of spinal pain varied between 40% and 60% across the physical locations. Progression of pain from one to more locations and from infrequent to more frequent was common over the two-year period.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Pediatrics Page

(more…)