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The Association Between Psychological and Social Factors and Spinal Pain in Adolescents

By |November 29, 2018|Pediatrics, Spinal Pain|

The Association Between Psychological and Social Factors and Spinal Pain in Adolescents

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SOURCE:   Eur J Pediatr. 2018 (Nov 21) [Epub]

Sarah Batley & Ellen Aartun & Eleanor Boyle & Jan Hartvigsen & Paula J. Stern & Lise Hestbæk

Graduate Studies,
Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College,
6100 Leslie Street,
Toronto, M2H 3J1, Canada.


Spinal pain, back pain, and/or neck pain begins early in life and is strongly associated with spinal pain in adulthood. Understanding the relationship between psychological and social factors and adolescent spinal pain may be important in both the prevention and treatment of spinal pain in this age group. We aimed to determine if psychological and social factors were associated with spinal pain in a cross-sectional study of a school-based cohort of 1279 Danish adolescents aged 11–13, who were categorized into “any” and “substantial” spinal pain.

“Substantial spinal pain” was defined as a lifetime frequency of “sometimes” or “often” and a pain intensity of at least two on the revised Faces Pain Scale. Logistic regression analyses, stratified by sex, were conducted for single and all variables together. Eighty-six percent of participants reported “any spinal pain” and 28% reported “substantial spinal pain”. Frequency of psychological and social factors was significantly higher in those with spinal pain compared to those without. As the frequency of psychological and social factors increased, the odds of both “any spinal pain” and “substantial spinal pain” also increased.

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Association Between Utilization of Chiropractic Services for Treatment of Low Back Pain and Risk of Adverse Drug Events

By |June 7, 2018|Spinal Pain|

Association Between Utilization of Chiropractic Services for Treatment of Low Back Pain and Risk of Adverse Drug Events

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 2018 (May 26) [Epub]

James M. Whedon, DC, MS, Andrew W.J. Toler, MS, Justin M. Goehl, DC, MS, Louis A. Kazal, MD

Health Services Research,
Southern California University of Health Sciences,
Whittier, California.


OBJECTIVES:   Mortality rates due to adverse drug events (ADEs) are escalating in the United States. Analgesics are among the drug classes most often associated with occurrence of an ADE. Utilization of nonpharmacologic chiropractic services for treatment of low back pain could lead to reduced risk of an ADE. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the association between utilization of chiropractic services and likelihood of an ADE.

METHODS:   We employed a retrospective cohort design to analyze health insurance claims data from the state of New Hampshire. After inversely weighting each participant by their propensity to be in their cohort, we employed logistic regression to compare recipients of chiropractic services to nonrecipients with regard to likelihood of occurrence of an ADE in an outpatient setting.

RESULTS:   The risk of an ADE was significantly lower among recipients of chiropractic services as compared with nonrecipients. The adjusted likelihood of an ADE occurring in an outpatient setting within 12 months was 51% lower among recipients of chiropractic services as compared to nonrecipients (OR 0.49; P = .0002). The reported ADEs were nonspecific with regard to drug category in the majority of incidents that occurred in both cohorts.

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Chiropractic and Spinal Pain Management Page

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Advancements in the Management of Spine Disorders

By |February 11, 2018|Chronic Neck Pain, Spinal Pain|

Advancements in the Management of Spine Disorders

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SOURCE:   Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 2012 (Apr); 26 (2): 263–280

Scott Haldeman, MD, Professor, Deborah Kopansky-Giles, DC, MSc, Eric L. Hurwitz, DC, PhD, Damian Hoy, BAppSc (Physio), MPH, PhD, W. Mark Erwin, DC, PhD, Simon Dagenais, DC, PhD, MSc, Greg Kawchuk, DC, PhD, Björn Strömqvist, MD, PhD, Nicolas Walsh, MD

Department of Neurology,
University of California,
Irvine, USA.


Spinal disorders and especially back and neck pain affect more people and have greater impact on work capacity and health-care costs than any other musculoskeletal condition. One of the difficulties in reducing the burden of spinal disorders is the wide and heterogeneous range of specific diseases and non-specific musculoskeletal disorders that can involve the spinal column, most of which manifest as pain. Despite, or perhaps because of its impact, spinal disorders remain one of the most controversial and difficult conditions for clinicians, patients and policymakers to manage. This paper provides a brief summary of advances in the understanding of back and neck pain over the past decade as evidenced in the current literature. This paper includes the following sections: a classification of spinal disorders; the epidemiology of spine pain in the developed and developing world; key advancements in biological and biomechanical sciences in spine pain; the current status of potential methods for the prevention of back and neck pain; rheumatological and systemic disorders that impact the spine; and evidence-based surgical and non-surgical management of spine pain.

The final section of this paper looks to the future and proposes actions and strategies that may be considered by the international Bone and Joint Decade (BJD), by providers, institutions and by policymakers so that we may better address the burden of spine disorders at global and local levels.


From the FULL TEXT Article:

Introduction

Spinal pain and its associated disorders affect more people and have greater impact on work capacity and health-care costs than any other musculoskeletal condition. Recent studies suggest that, in many societies, spinal disorders are a greater source of disability and impact the consumption of more health-care resources than any other class of diseases or health problems. [1] Despite, or perhaps because of its impact, spinal disorders remain one of the most controversial and difficult conditions for clinicians, patients and policymakers to manage.

One of the difficulties in reducing the impact of spinal pain is the wide and heterogeneous range of specific diseases and non-specific musculoskeletal disorders that can involve the spinal column, most of which manifest as spinal pain. These disorders have been classified in multiple ways but the most widely accepted classification includes four well-defined clinical categories as noted in Table 1.

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Chronic Neck Pain Page

Spinal Pain Management Page

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Patient Expectations of Benefit from Common Interventions for Low Back Pain and Effects on Outcome

By |October 12, 2017|Patient Expectations, Spinal Pain|

Patient Expectations of Benefit from Common Interventions for Low Back Pain and Effects on Outcome: Secondary Analysis of a Clinical Trial of Manual Therapy Interventions

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Man Manip Ther. 2011 (Feb);   19 (1):   20–25

Mark D Bishop, Joel E Bialosky & Josh A Cleland

Department of Physical Therapy,
University of Florida, USA.


OBJECTIVES:   The purpose of this secondary analysis was 1) to examine patient expectations related to a variety of common interventions for low back pain (LBP) and 2) to determine the influence that specific expectations about spinal manipulation might have had on self-report of disability.

METHODS:   We collected patients’ expectations about the benefit of specific interventions for low back pain. We also collected patients’ general expectations about treatment and tested the relationships among the expectation of benefit from an intervention, receiving that intervention and disability-related outcomes.

RESULTS:   Patients expected exercise and manual therapy interventions to provide more benefit than surgery and medication. There was a statistical association between expecting relief from thrust techniques and receiving thrust techniques, related to meeting the general expectation for treatment (chi-square: 15.5, P = 0.008). This was not the case for patients who expected relief from thrust techniques but did not receive it (chi-square: 6.9, P = 0.4). Logistic regression modeling was used to predict change in disability at treatment visit 5. When controlling for whether the general expectations for treatment were met, intervention assignment and the interaction between intervention assignment and expectations regarding thrust techniques, the parsimonious model only included intervention as the significant contributor to the model (P < 0.001). The adjusted odds ratio of success comparing thrust techniques to non-thrust in this study was 41.2 (11.0, 201.7).

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Patient Expectations of Relief

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Recommendations to the Musculoskeletal Health Network

By |September 14, 2017|Chiropractic Care, Spinal Pain|

Recommendations to the Musculoskeletal Health Network, Health Department of Western Australia related to the Spinal Pain Model of Care made on behalf of the Chiropractors Association of Australia (Western Australian Branch)

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Topics in Integrative Health Care 2014 (Jun 30); 5 (2)

Lyndon G. Amorin-Woods, BAppSci(Chiropractic),
Gregory F. Parkin-Smith, MTech(Chiro), MBBS, MSc, DrHC,
Vern Saboe, DC, DACAN, FACO,
Anthony L. Rosner, Ph.D., LL.D.[Hon.], LLC


The 2009 Spinal Model of Care published by the Western Australian Health Department via the Musculoskeletal Health Network would benefit from an update. Best-evidence synthesis and cost-risks-benefits estimations suggest that such guidelines should provide:

(1)   the early assessment of patients with non-malignant spinal pain (particularly low back) by a musculoskeletal clinician, be it a chiropractor, musculoskeletal physician, osteopath or musculoskeletal physiotherapist with referral within the early stages of the disorder; and

(2)   the provision of manipulative therapy, where indicated, as a first-line treatment while also providing rehabilitation, health promotion, and contemporary wellness/wellbeing management with the intention of avoiding chronicity.

Emerging workforce capacity suggests that early assessment and evidence-based management of non-malignant spinal pain is feasible, leading to better patient outcomes. The authors and the association are hopeful that providing this submission in open access may prove useful for advocates of the chiropractic profession in other jurisdictions.


From the FULL TEXT Article:

Background

The importance of addressing spinal pain in the Australian community in a cost effective and clinically appropriate manner is illustrated in a series of studies emerging from the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Project. [1] It is well-known that musculoskeletal conditions, such as low back pain, neck pain and arthritis, affect more than 1.7 billion people worldwide and are set to become more prevalent with a growing, ageing, developed world population. [2] Australian chiropractors may occupy a pivotal role in the cost effective management of these clinical presentations.

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Low Back Pain and Chiropractic Page

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Chiropractic and Spinal Pain Management

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