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Brain Atrophy in Cognitively Impaired Elderly

By |July 29, 2015|Alzheimer's Disease, Supplementation|

Brain Atrophy in Cognitively Impaired Elderly:
The Importance of Long-chain ω-3 Fatty Acids
and B Vitamin Status in a Randomized Controlled Trial

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 (Jul);   102 (1):   215–221

Fredrik Jernerén, Amany K Elshorbagy, Abderrahim Oulhaj,
Stephen M Smith, Helga Refsum, and A David Smith

From the Oxford Project to Investigate Memory and Ageing (OPTIMA),
Department of Pharmacology,
University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom;
fredrik.jerneren@pharm.ox.ac.uk



This study provides clarity to earlier studies that found that B vitamins and/or Omega-3 fatty acids were found to slow brain loss in areas of the brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease.


In a 2010 study, Smith et al. [1] (in the Oxford Project to Investigate Memory and Ageing study) gave 271 individuals with mild cognitive impairment high-dose B vitamins for 2 years.   Pre- and post-MRI studies were done, and they demonstrated that the B vitamin group experienced 30-percent slower rates of brain atrophy, on average, and in some cases patients experienced reductions as high as 53 percent.


In a 2012 study, Bowman et al. [2] (in the Oregon Brain Aging Study) reviewed blood nutrient levels in 104 dementia-free elders.   They found two nutrient biomarker patterns (NBPs) that were associated with more favorable cognitive and MRI measures: one was high plasma levels of the vitamins B, C, D, and E, and the second NBP was high plasma marine omega-3 fatty acids.   They also demonstrated that high trans fat blood levels were associated with less favorable cognitive function and less total cerebral brain volumes.

When this article was pre-released, the New York Times ran a banner headline titled:
4 Vitamins That Strengthen Older Brains. [3]


In a 2013 study, Douaud et al. [4] provided high-dose B-vitamin treatment to elderly subjects with increased dementia risk for 2 years.   They found that B vitamins reduced brain shrinkage and reduced levels of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy).   This is important because many cross-sectional and prospective studies have shown that high tHcy levels are associated with cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and vascular dementia.


The current study also helps explain why some trials that focused solely on the B vitamins or Omega-3s had mixed results. Apparently having high blood levels of BOTH the B vitamins AND Omega-3 fatty acids provides better results in preventing the deterioration of brain tissue in Alzheimer’s patients.


REFERENCES:

  1. Homocysteine-lowering by B Vitamins Slows the Rate of Accelerated Brain Atrophy in Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Randomized Controlled Trial
    PLoS One. 2010 (Sep 8); 5 (9): e12244

  2. Nutrient Biomarker Patterns, Cognitive Function, and MRI Measures of Brain Aging
    Neurology. 2012 (Jan 24); 78 (4): 241–249

  3. 4 Vitamins That Strengthen Older Brains
    The New York Times ~ January 2, 2012

  4. Preventing Alzheimer’s Disease-related Gray Matter Atrophy by B-vitamin Treatment
    Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 (Jun 4); 110 (23): 9523–9528

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Cross-Sectional Analysis of Telomere Length in People 33-80 Years of Age: Effects of Dietary Supplementation

By |March 28, 2015|Supplementation|

Cross-Sectional Analysis of Telomere Length in People 33-80 Years of Age: Effects of Dietary Supplementation

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Poster Presentation at the American College of Nutrition’s
55th Annual Conference


Calvin B. Harley, PhD; Joanne Chan, BS;
Marsha Blauwkamp, PhD; Francis C. Lau, PhD, FACN;
Jamie F. McManus, MD, FAAFP; Drew Watson, PhD;
Evangelos Hytopoulos, PhD; and
Bruce P. Daggy, PhD, FACN

Telomere Diagnostics,
Menlo Park, CA


Abstract

Telomere length has been associated with aging, age-related diseases, adverse conditions, and mortality. Moreover, studies in humans suggest a causal role of short telomeres or accelerated telomere shortening in disease and mortality risk. A previous cross-sectional study has shown that Shaklee supplement usage significantly improved various health parameters and nutritional status. [1] The objective of the current cross-sectional study was to explore the effect of dietary supplementation on telomere length.

The normal range of telomere lengths was determined from saliva samples in a population of healthy, non-smoking subjects aged 33-80 from the San Francisco Bay Area (control group; n=324; 147 males and 177 females) who took no more than 3 supplements daily. The telomere lengths of heavy supplement users (supplement group; n=80; 21 males and 59 females), the majority of whom took more than 12 Shaklee supplements at least 4 days per week, were compared to the age-matched control group. Disease and smoking status were not exclusion criteria for the supplement group. Telomere length was measured by quantitative PCR to determine the telomere-to-single copy gene (T/S) ratio. Change in T/S ratio over time was fitted to a linear regression. Blood biomarkers were also assessed.

Overall, women had longer telomeres than men in the control group, but this trend was reversed in the supplement group. (Refer to Figures 3 & 4 below) T/S ratio of the supplement group was 11.2% greater than that of the control group (p<0.0001). Supplementation resulted in a greater treatment effect in men vs. women (p<0.005). By linear regression, the rate of change in T/S ratio was reduced by 40% in the supplement group vs control. Blood biomarkers in both groups were comparable and were within the normal physiological ranges.

There are more articles like this @ our:

All About Telomeres Page

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Nutritional Factors Affecting Postpartum Depression

By |August 5, 2014|Nutrient Deficiency, Postpartum Depression, Supplementation|

Nutritional Factors Affecting Postpartum Depression

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Clin Chiropractic Pediatrics 2011 (Jun);   12 (1):   849–860

Lia M. Nightingale, PhD

Assistant Professor, Division of Life Sciences,
Palmer College of Chiropractic,
1000 Brady Street, Davenport, IA 52803, USA.
Email: lia.nightingale@palmer.edu


Pregnancy and lactation represent a period of substantial physiological changes for the mother and increased nutritional requirements to meet these adjustments. A number of nutritional depletions occur during pregnancy. Serum concentrations of iron and folate take months before they normalize to pre-pregnancy levels. Additionally, many micronutrients required during pregnancy interfere with each other, making absorption difficult. Postpartum depression is the primary complication of childbirth, possibly caused by several nutritional and non-nutritional factors. The current review highlights the impact nutrition may have on the etiology of this debilitating disorder, most notably on prevention of inflammation and maintenance of a healthy central nervous system. The most notable nutritional deficiencies associated with postpartum depression include omega-3 fatty acids, folate, iron, and zinc; however, supplementation trials for prevention of postpartum depression are severely lacking. Practical recommendations are given to minimize micronutrient interference and reduce the risk of postpartum depression.

Key Words:   postpartum depression, nutrition, diet, folate, essential fatty acids, iron, zinc


From the Full-Text Article:

Introduction

Depression is the second leading cause of disability for those of reproductive age. [1] Although all forms of depression are devastating, postpartum depression (PPD) has long-lasting consequences for all family members involved. Postpartum depression is the most common complication of childbirth, defined as having major or minor depressive episodes that occur within 12 months after delivery. [2, 3] Postpartum depression has been associated with impaired mother-child interactions, poorer child development, and more violent behavior in children with mothers displaying PPD. [4-6]

Pregnancy is a time of increased nutritional requirements to support fetal growth and development. There are several lines of thought concerning the cause of PPD, including the link between nutritional intake and risk of depression. Therefore, the goal of this review is to examine maternal depletion of nutrients, assess whether these nutritional factors may play a role in PPD, and summarize simple recommendations to implement in practice.


Prevalence

There are more articles like this @ our:

Women’s Health Page and the:

Chiropractic Pediatrics Page

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Get the Lead Out!

By |May 13, 2013|Iatrogenic Injury, Pediatrics, Pregnancy, Supplementation|

Get the Lead Out!

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   MedPage Today ~ May 13, 2013

By Nancy Walsh, Staff Writer, MedPage Today


When the FDA finally got around to testing 324 multivitamin-mineral products that target children and pregnant women, they found that only 4 of them were lead-free.   [1]

Now, new research published in the Pediatrics Journal suggests that even low levels of lead in a supplement can have adverse effects on your children.   [2]   Why not use a supplement made correctly, so you can protect your family?


Here’s the Bad news from MedPage Today:


Even Low Lead Exposure Hinders Kids’ Reading


Young children exposed to lead — even at low levels — are at risk for not meeting reading readiness benchmarks in kindergarten, a large study of urban children found.

On tests of reading readiness, children with blood lead levels between 5 and 9 µg/dL scored 4.5 points (95% CI −2.9 to −6.2) lower than those with levels below 5 µg/dL, according to Pat McLaine, DPH, of the University of Maryland in Baltimore, and colleagues.

And those with lead levels of 10 µg/dL and higher had scores 10.1 points (95% CI −7 to −13.3) lower, the researchers reported online in Pediatrics.  [2] (more…)

A Practical Guide to Avoiding Drug-Induced Nutrient Depletion

By |June 25, 2012|Clinical Decision-making, Complementary Medicine, Diagnosis, Drug-Induced Nutrient Depletion, Evaluation & Management, Evidence-based Medicine, Iatrogenic Injury, Supplementation|

A Practical Guide to Avoiding Drug-Induced Nutrient Depletion

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Nutrition Review ~ October 2011

By Hyla Cass, MD


A little known, but potentially life-saving fact is that common medications deplete your body of a host of vital nutrients essential to your health. This practical guide will show you how to avoid drug-induced nutrient depletion and discuss options for replacing nutrient-robbing medications with natural supplements.

America has been called a pill-popping society, and the statistics bear this out. Nearly 50 percent of all American adults regularly take at least one prescription drug, and 20 percent take three or more. [1] Our increasing reliance on prescription medications has contributed to the growing problem with nutrient depletion. The truth is that every medication, including over-the-counter drugs, depletes your body of specific, vital nutrients. This is especially concerning when you consider that most Americans are already suffering from nutrient depletion. Additionally, many of the conditions physicians see in their everyday practice may actually be related to nutrient depletion. The good news is that, armed with information and the right supplements, you can avoid the side effects of nutrient depletion, and even better, you may be able to control and prevent chronic diseases, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis.

There is more info like this at our:

Nutrient Depletion Page

A Common Scenario

(more…)

The Use of Botanicals During Pregnancy and Lactation

By |June 10, 2012|Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Supplementation|

The Use of Botanicals During Pregnancy and Lactation

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE: Alt Ther in Health and Med 2009 (Jan); 15 (1): 54-58 ~ FULL TEXT

Tieraona Low Dog, MD

Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine,
University of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson


Women are the largest consumers of healthcare, and this extends to their utilization of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Researchers have attempted to uncover the reasons why women turn to CAM in general and to botanical medicine in particular. Desire to have personal control over their health has been cited as the strongest motive for women to use herbal medicine. Second was dissatisfaction with conventional treatment and its disregard for a holistic approach, as well as concerns about the side effects of medications. [1]

These concerns may explain, in part, the fact that many women use herbal remedies during pregnancy. A survey of 578 pregnant women in the eastern United States reported that 45% of respondents had used herbal medicines, [2] and a survey of 588 women in Australia revealed that 36% had used at least 1 herbal product during pregnancy. [2] Women probably feel comfortable using herbal remedies because of their perceived safety, easy access, and the widespread availability of information about them (ie, Internet, magazines, books).

While it is true that many botanicals are mild in both treatment effects and side effects, the data regarding safety during pregnancy are very limited. Given the small sample sizes in clinical trials studying botanicals in pregnant women, only large differences in measures of pregnancy outcomes would likely be detected. For example, if an herb were thought to increase the rate of spontaneous abortion from 6% to 7%, a sample size of more than 19,000 women would be needed (to actually demonstrate that effect). It is highly unlikely that there will be any studies of a botanical (or any drug for that matter) with this large a sample size. (more…)