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Harvard Endorses Chiropractic

By |December 8, 2017|Uncategorized|

Harvard Endorses Chiropractic

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Dynamic Chiropractic 2017 (Deec); 35 (12)

By Donald M. Petersen Jr., BS, HCD(hc), FICC(h)


Harvard Health Publishing is an arm of the prestigious Harvard Medical School. The publisher’s tag line is “Trusted advice for a healthier life.” Probably the most popular Harvard Health publication is the Harvard Health Letter, which you’ve probably seen or heard referenced.

The Harvard Medical School is one of the more notable exceptions to the rule that medical establishments are generally anti-chiropractic. You may have seen its Special Health Report “Pain Relief: Natural and Alternative Remedies Without Drugs or Surgery,” published in 2015. [1]

While certainly not as all-encompassing as one would have hoped for, the report not only features a section on chiropractic, but also includes chiropractic in the low back pain section, as well as two patient “stories.” The first story (“Gary’s Story: A Journey to Pain Relief”) talks about Gary’s primary MD referring him to a chiropractor. The second story (“Alice’s Story: A Comprehensive Approach to Pain Relief”) talks about how Alice has been using chiropractic, along with other nondrug interventions, for years with positive results.

Last month the Harvard Health Letter featured an article: “Where to Turn for Low Back Pain Relief.” The article’s deck answers the question: “In most cases, a primary care doctor or chiropractor can help resolve the problem.” [2]

Under the section titled “Where to Turn,” we read that for people suffering from back pain, their first call should be to a primary care physician or a chiropractor. Dr. Matthew Kowalski, a DC at Harvard’s Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, is quoted as saying that 35-42 percent of people experiencing their first episode of back pain consult a doctor of chiropractic.

The report concludes by reminding patients that most common back pain issues will be effectively addressed by a primary care MD or a chiropractor. It also references Harvard’s 2014 report on back pain (which also includes information about chiropractic).

There are many observations that immediately come to mind when reading this 2017 report.

Here are my top three:

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Founder’s Day:   Chiropractic Turns 122 Today

By |September 18, 2017|Uncategorized|

Founder’s Day:   Chiropractic Turns 122 Today

The Chiro.Org Blog


     
Harvey Lillard (L)               D.D. Palmer (R)

The Story of Chiropractic

The year was 1895, the same year that x-rays were discovered. At that time, Health Care was provided by a diverse group of unregulated and unlicensed professions, including osteopaths, magnetic healers, and “medical” doctors.   In those days, most medical education consisted of working as an “apprentice” for a medical doctor, and learning the craft by observation.

D.D. Palmer, the Father of Chiropractic, was a magnetic healer,
with a huge practice in Davenport, Iowa.   He had doubts about the
“germ theory” as the complete explanation for the cause of all disease.

After all, if germs kill… shouldn’t we all be dead?   He asked himself:

how it was that 2 brothers could work in the same shop, eat the same food, sleep in the same bed, and that one would succumb to a disease while the other one would not”?

His theory evolved that it was not just the “seed” (or germ) which was the sole cause of dis-ease.   He felt that the “soil”, or the recuperative power of the body (which he later referred to as “innate intelligence”, and we now call homeostasis) was the missing component of the equation, which defines the continuum between health and “dis-ease”.

One day D.D. was talking with Harvey Lillard, the man who owned the janitor service in his building.   Harvey was deaf.   He mentioned to D.D. that years before, while lifting a heavy weight, he felt something “snap” at the base of his neck.   Shortly thereafter his hearing started to fade.

D.D. was intrigued, and asked Harvey if he could have permission examine his back.   What D.D. “felt” (we refer to this art as “palpation) was that one of the upper thoracic bones was sticking out much more than the one above or below it.   He explained to Harvey that he felt that this “bone out of place
could be causing pressure on his spinal cord, and that this could be the
reason that Harvey was now deaf.

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Effectiveness of Manual Therapy for Chronic Tension-type Headache

By |August 9, 2017|Chiropractic Care, Chronic Tension-type Headache, Uncategorized|

Effectiveness of Manual Therapy for Chronic Tension-type Headache: A Pragmatic, Randomised, Clinical Trial

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Cephalalgia. 2011 (Jan); 31 (2): 133–143

Rene F Castien, Danielle AWM van der Windt,
Anneke Grooten and Joost Dekker

Healthcare Centre Haarlemmermeer,
The Netherlands.


OBJECTIVE:   To evaluate the effectiveness of manual therapy (MT) in participants with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH).

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:   We conducted a multicentre, pragmatic, randomised, clinical trial with partly blinded outcome assessment. Eighty-two participants with CTTH were randomly assigned to MT or to usual care by the general practitioner (GP). Primary outcome measures were frequency of headache and use of medication. Secondary outcome measures were severity of headache, disability and cervical function.

RESULTS:   After 8 weeks (n = 80) and 26 weeks (n = 75), a significantly larger reduction of headache frequency was found for the MT group (mean difference at 8 weeks, -6.4 days; 95% CI -8.3 to -4.5; effect size, 1.6). Disability and cervical function showed significant differences in favour of the MT group at 8 weeks but were not significantly different at 26 weeks.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Headache and Chiropractic Page

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Changes in Muscle Spasticity in Patients With Cerebral Palsy After Spinal Manipulation

By |June 18, 2017|Cerebral Palsy, Uncategorized|

Changes in Muscle Spasticity in Patients With Cerebral Palsy After Spinal Manipulation: Case Series

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Chiropractic Medicine 2016 (Dec); 15 (4): 299—304

Oleh Kachmar, MD, PhD, Taras Voloshyn, MD,
and Mykhailo Hordiyevych, MD

Innovative Technologies Department,
International Clinic of Rehabilitation,
Truskavets, Ukraine.


OBJECTIVE:   The purpose of this case series was to report quantitative changes in wrist muscle spasticity in children with cerebral palsy after 1 spinal manipulation (SM) and a 2-week course of treatment.

METHODS:   Twenty-nine patients, aged 7 to 18 years, with spastic forms of cerebral palsy and without fixed contracture of the wrist, were evaluated before initiation of treatment, after 1 SM, and at the end of a 2-week course of treatment. Along with daily SM, the program included physical therapy, massage, reflexotherapy, extremity joint mobilization, mechanotherapy, and rehabilitation computer games for 3 to 4 hours’ duration. Spasticity of the wrist flexor was measured quantitatively using a Neuroflexor device, which calculates the neural component (NC) of muscle tone, representing true spasticity, and excluding nonneural components, caused by altered muscle properties: elasticity and viscosity.

RESULTS:   Substantial decrease in spasticity was noted in all patient groups after SM. The average NC values decreased by 1.65 newtons (from 7.6 ± 6.2 to 5.9 ± 6.5) after 1 SM. Another slight decrease of 0.5 newtons was noted after a 2-week course of treatment. In the group of patients with minimal spasticity, the decrease in NC after the first SM was almost twofold-from 3.93 ± 2.9 to 2.01 ± 1.0. In cases of moderate spasticity, NC reduction was noted only after the 2-week course of intensive treatment.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Cerebral Palsy and Chiropractic Page

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Elon Musk’s chiropractic connection

By |May 16, 2017|History, Uncategorized|

Source Regina Leader-Post

Dr. Scott Haldeman is a board certified Neurologist in active clinical practice in Santa Ana, California. He currently is a distinguished Professor at the University of California, the Chairman of the Research Council for the World Federation of Chiropractic and the Founder/President of World Spine Care.

 

Accomplished in his own right, he also happens to be the uncle of one of the worlds great innovators, Elon Musk. Read how the young Musk spent time on the Haldeman family farm in Saskatchewan. Both Scott’s father and his grandmother (Musk’s great-grandmother) were chiropractors. In fact, Almeda Haldeman became Canada’s first known chiropractor in the early 1900’s.

You can read the rest of the story here.

Information on the Haldeman’s and other chiropractic pioneers can be found in Dr J.C. Keating’s notes in our Chiropractic History section.

The Effect of Chiropractic Techniques on the Cobb Angle in Idiopathic Scoliosis Arising in Adolescence

By |May 20, 2016|Scoliosis, Uncategorized|

The Effect of Chiropractic Techniques on the Cobb Angle in Idiopathic Scoliosis Arising in Adolescence

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   J Phys Ther Sci. 2016 (Apr); 28 (4): 1106–1110

Sunghak Byun, PhD and Dongwook Han, PhD, PT

Department of Physical Therapy,
College of Health and Welfare,
Silla University, Republic of Korea.


Purpose   The purpose of this study was to examine whether chiropractic techniques would reduce the curvature of idiopathic scoliosis, which commonly occurs in elementary school children.

Subjects   The subjects of this study were 5 healthy elementary students who listened to an explanation of the study methods and purpose of the study and agreed to participate in the experiment.

Methods   The Cobb angle was measured by taking an X-ray (FCT-1, Dongmun, Goyangsi, Republic of Korea) taken from the rear, using X-ray film. The method of intervention this study used was application of chiropractic techniques. Spinal correction was carried out for 30 minutes per session, which included soft tissue massage, 3 times a week for 8 weeks.

Results   It was established that the Cobb angle was noticeably decreased after 4 weeks of the intervention. Post Hoc analysis revealed that the Cobb angle noticeably decreased after 4 weeks compared with the Cobb angle before the chiropractic techniques were applied. However, no significant difference in Cobb angle was evident after the fourth week.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Scoliosis and Chiropractic Page

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