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Whiplash-associated Disorders: Who Gets Depressed? Who Stays Depressed?

By |July 24, 2017|Depression, Whiplash|

Whiplash-associated Disorders:
Who Gets Depressed? Who Stays Depressed?

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SOURCE:   Eur Spine J. 2010 (Jun); 19 (6): 945–956

Leah A. Phillips, Linda J. Carroll,
J. David Cassidy, and Pierre Côté

Department of Public Health Sciences,
Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research,
School of Public Health, University of Alberta,
4075 RTF, 8308 114 St, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E1, Canada.


Depression is common in whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). Our objectives were to identify factors associated with depressive symptomatology occurring in the initial stages of WAD, and to identify factors predicting the course of depressive symptoms. A population-based cohort of adults sustaining traffic-related WAD was followed at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Baseline measures (assessed a median of 11 days post-crash) included demographic and collision-related factors, prior health, and initial post-crash pain and symptoms. Depressive symptomatology was assessed at baseline and at each follow-up using the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale   (CES-D).   We included only those who participated at all follow-ups (n = 3,452; 59% of eligible participants). Using logistic regression, we identified factors associated with initial (post-crash) depression. Using multinomial regression, we identified baseline factors predicting course of depression. Courses of depression were no depression; initial depression that resolves, recurs or persists, and later onset depression. Factors associated with initial depression included greater neck and low back pain severity, greater percentage of body in pain, numbness/tingling in arms/hand, dizziness, vision problems, post-crash anxiety, fracture, prior mental health problems, and poorer general health. Predictors of persistent depression included older age, greater initial neck and low back pain, post-crash dizziness, vision and hearing problems, numbness/tingling in arms/hands, anxiety, prior mental health problems, and poorer general health. Recognition of these underlying risk factors may assist health care providers to predict the course of psychological reactions and to provide effective interventions.


From the FULL TEXT Article:

Introduction

The biopsychosocial model of health posits that in addition to biomedical factors, psychological, and sociological factors play important roles in the diagnosis, treatment, and recovery from illness and disease. [11] According to the Quebec Task Force on whiplash-associated disorders, whiplash is defined as an acceleration–deceleration mechanism of energy transferred to the neck as a result of a motor vehicle collision, and the resulting injury or cluster of symptoms is referred to as whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). [20] WAD is a disorder where the interplay between biological and psychosocial factors appears to have an important effect on recovery. [8]

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Low Speed Frontal Crashes and Low Speed Rear Crashes

By |May 29, 2017|Whiplash|

Low Speed Frontal Crashes and Low Speed Rear Crashes: Is There a Differential Risk for Injury?

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SOURCE:   Annu Proc Assoc Adv Automot Med. 2002; 46: 79–91

Croft AC, Haneline MT, Freeman MD

Spine Research Institute of San Diego,
San Diego, California, USA.


We compared male and female subjects in crash tests in which each subject experienced both frontal and rear impacts. Crash speed and other crash parameters were held constant. We believe this was the first experiment using an independent variable of crash vector and dependent variables of head linear acceleration and volunteer qualitative tolerance.

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Mild Traumatic Brain Injury After Motor Vehicle Collisions:
What Are the Symptoms and Who Treats Them?

By |January 29, 2017|Chronic Neck Pain, Whiplash|

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury After Motor Vehicle Collisions: What Are the Symptoms and Who Treats Them? A Population-Based 1-Year Inception Cohort Study

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SOURCE:   Arch Phys Med Rehab 2014 (Mar); 95 (3 Sup): S286–294

Jan Hartvigsen, PhD, Eleanor Boyle, PhD,
J. David Cassidy, PhD, DrMedSc,
Linda J. Carroll, PhD

Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics,
University of Southern Denmark,
Odense, Denmark;
Nordic Institute of Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics,
Odense, Denmark.


OBJECTIVE:   To describe the 1-year course of symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) sustained in a motor vehicle collision as well as patterns of care-seeking.

DESIGN:   One-year follow-up of a population-based inception cohort.

SETTING:   The province of Saskatchewan, Canada, with a population of about 1,000,000 inhabitants.

PARTICIPANTS:   Persons (N=1716) sustaining an MTBI during a car collision between November 1997 and December 1999.

INTERVENTIONS:   Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:   We report the prevalence of sleep disturbances, tiredness, dizziness, forgetfulness, vision problems, hearing problems, headache, neck pain, mid back pain, and low back pain at 6 weeks and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postcollision. At the same time points, we report self-reported care-seeking from registered health care professionals.

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A Population-based, Incidence Cohort Study of Mid-back Pain After Traffic Collisions

By |December 11, 2016|Traffic Collisions, Whiplash|

A Population-based, Incidence Cohort Study of Mid-back Pain After Traffic Collisions: Factors Associated with Global Recovery

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Eur J Pain. 2015 (Nov); 19 (10): 1486–1495 ~ FULL TEXT

M.S. Johansson, E. Boyle, J. Hartvigsen,
M. Jensen Stochkendahl, L. Carroll, and
J.D. Cassidy

Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics,
Faculty of Health,
University of Southern Denmark,
Odense, Denmark.


BACKGROUND:   Traffic collisions often result in a wide range of symptoms included in the umbrella term whiplash-associated disorders. Mid-back pain (MBP) is one of these symptoms. The incidence and prognosis of different traffic injuries and their related conditions (e.g. neck pain, low back pain, depression or others) has been investigated previously; however, knowledge about traffic collision-related MBP is lacking. The study objectives were to describe the incidence, course of recovery and prognosis of MBP after traffic collisions, in terms of global self-reported recovery.

METHODS:   Longitudinal data from a population-based inception cohort of all traffic injuries occurring in Saskatchewan, Canada, during a 2-year period were used. Annual overall and age-sex-specific incidence rates were calculated, the course of recovery was described using the Kaplan-Meier technique, and associations between participant characteristics and time-to-self-reported recovery were explored in 3,496 MBP cases using Cox proportional hazards models.

RESULTS:   The yearly incidence rate was 236 per 100,000 population during the study period, and was highest in women and in young persons. The median time-to-first reported recovery was 101 days (95% CI: 99-104) and about 23% were still not recovered after 1 year. Participant’s expectation for recovery, general health, extent of severely affecting comorbidities and having experienced a previous traffic injury were some of the prognostic factors identified.

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Comparing 2 Whiplash Grading Systems
To Predict Clinical Outcomes

By |September 2, 2016|Whiplash|

Comparing 2 Whiplash Grading Systems
To Predict Clinical Outcomes

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SOURCE:   J Chiropractic Medicine 2016 (Jun); 15 (2): 81–86

Arthur C. Croft, PhD, DC, MSc, MPH, Alireza Bagherian, DC,
Patrick K. Mickelsen, DC, Stephen Wagner, DC

Spine Research Institute of San Diego,
San Diego, CA.


OBJECTIVE:   Two whiplash severity grading systems have been developed: Quebec Task Force on Whiplash-Associated Disorders (QTF-WAD) and the Croft grading system. The majority of clinical studies to date have used the modified grading system published by the QTF-WAD in 1995 and have demonstrated some ability to predict outcome. But most studies include only injuries of lower severity (grades 1 and 2), preventing a broader interpretation. The purpose of this study was assess the ability of these grading systems to predict clinical outcome within the context of a broader injury spectrum.

METHODS:   This study evaluated both grading systems for their ability to predict the bivalent outcome, recovery, within a sample of 118 whiplash patients who were part of a previous case-control designed study. Of these, 36% (controls) had recovered, and 64% (cases) had not recovered. The discrete bivariate distribution between recovery status and whiplash grade was analyzed using the 2-tailed cross-tabulation statistics.

RESULTS:   Applying the criteria of the original 1993 Croft grading system, the subset comprised 1 grade 1 injury, 32 grade 2 injuries, 53 grade 3 injuries, and 32 grade 4 injuries. Applying the criteria of the modified (QTF-WAD) grading system, there were 1 grade 1 injury, 89 grade 2 injuries, and 28 grade 3 injuries. Both whiplash grading systems correlated negatively with recovery; that is, higher severity grades predicted a lower probability of recovery, and statistically significant correlations were observed in both, but the Croft grading system substantially outperformed the QTF-WAD system on this measure.

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Vertical Posture and Head Stability in Patients With Chronic Neck Pain

By |May 19, 2016|Chronic Neck Pain, Whiplash|

Vertical Posture and Head Stability in Patients With Chronic Neck Pain

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SOURCE:   J Rehabil Med. 2003 (Sep); 35 (5): 229–235

P. Michaelson, M. Michaelson, S. Jaric,
M .L. Latash, P. Sjölander, M. Djupsjöbacka

Southern Lapland Research Department
Vilhelmina, Sweden.


OBJECTIVE:   To evaluate postural performance and head stabilization of patients with chronic neck pain.

DESIGN:   A single-blind comparative group study.

SUBJECTS:   Patients with work-related chronic neck pain (n = 9), with chronic whiplash associated disorders (n = 9) and healthy subjects (n = 16).

METHODS:   During quiet standing in different conditions (e.g. 1 and 2 feet standing, tandem standing, and open and closed eyes) the sway areas and the ability to maintain the postures were measured. The maximal peak-to-peak displacement of the centre of pressure and the head translation were analysed during predictable and unpredictable postural perturbations.

RESULTS:   Patients with chronic neck pain, in particular those with whiplash-associated disorders, showed larger sway areas and reduced ability to successfully execute more challenging balance tasks. They also displayed larger sway areas and reduced head stability during perturbations.

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