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The Effect of Spinal Manipulation on Deep Experimental Muscle Pain in Healthy Volunteers

By |February 23, 2017|Chiropractic Research, Pain Relief|

The Effect of Spinal Manipulation on Deep Experimental Muscle Pain in Healthy Volunteers

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Chiropractic & Manual Therapies 2015 (Sep 7);   23:   25

Søren O’Neill, Øystein Ødegaard-Olsen and Beate Søvde

Institute of Regional Health Research,
University of Southern Denmark,
Campusvej 55, Odense, 5230 DK Denmark ;

Spine Centre of Southern Denmark,
Lillebælt Hospital, Østre Hougvej 55,
Middelfart, 5500 DK Denmark


BACKGROUND:   High-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) spinal manipulation is commonly used in the treatment of spinal pain syndromes. The mechanisms by which HVLA-manipulation might reduce spinal pain are not well understood, but often assumed to relate to the reduction of biomechanical dysfunction. It is also possible however, that HVLA-manipulation involves a segmental or generalized inhibitory effect on nociception, irrespective of biomechanical function. In the current study it was investigated whether a local analgesic effect of HVLA-manipulation on deep muscle pain could be detected, in healthy individuals.

METHODS AND MATERIALS:   Local, para-spinal muscle pain was induced by injection of 0.5 ml sterile, hyper-tonic saline on two separate occasions 1 week apart. Immediately following the injection, treatment was administered as either a) HVLA-manipulation or b) placebo treatment, in a randomized cross-over design. Both interventions were conducted by an experienced chiropractor with minimum 6 years of clinical experience. Participants and the researcher collecting data were blinded to the treatment allocation. Pain scores following saline injection were measured by computerized visual analogue pain scale (VAS) (0-100 VAS, 1 Hz) and summarized as a) Pain duration, b) Maximum VAS, c) Time to maximum VAS and d) Summarized VAS (area under the curve). Data analysis was performed as two-way analysis of variance with treatment allocation and session number as explanatory variables.

RESULTS:   Twenty-nine healthy adults (mean age 24.5 years) participated, 13 women and 16 men. Complete data was available for 28 participants. Analysis of variance revealed no statistically significant difference between active and placebo manipulation on any of the four pain measures.

There are more articles like this @ our:

Chiropractic and Spinal Pain Page and the:

Subluxation Neurology Section

(more…)

An Inspiring Story

By |April 1, 2016|Video|

This powerful video shows the story of a young man whose life was dramatically altered by a relatively short course of properly applied chiropractic treatment. In the spirit of sharing, this video appears to have been produced to demonstrate chiropractic technique rather than as a vehicle for self-promotion.

“Find it, fix it, and leave it alone”

Unfortunately, this video has been removed by the author.

 

Chiropractic identity, role and future: a survey of North American chiropractic students

By |February 3, 2015|Research|

Source Chiropractic and Manual Therapies

Jordan A Gliedt, Cheryl Hawk, Michelle Anderson, Kashif Ahmad, Dinah Bunn,Jerrilyn Cambron, Brian Gleberzon, John Hart, Anupama Kizhakkeveettil, Stephen M Perle, Michael Ramcharan, Stephanie Sullivan and Liang Zhang

Abstract

Background

The literature pertaining to chiropractic students’ opinions with respect to the desired future status of the chiropractic physician is limited and is an appropriate topic worthy of study. A previous pilot study was performed at a single chiropractic college. This current study is an expansion of this pilot project to collect data from chiropractic students enrolled in colleges throughout North America.

Objective

The purpose of this study is to investigate North American chiropractic students’ opinions concerning professional identity, role and future.

Methods

A 23-item cross-sectional electronic questionnaire was developed. A total of 7,455 chiropractic students from 12 North American English-speaking chiropractic colleges were invited to complete the survey. Survey items encompassed demographics, evidence-based practice, chiropractic identity and setting, and scope of practice. Data were collected and descriptive statistical analysis was performed.

Results

A total of 1,247 (16.7% response rate) questionnaires were electronically submitted. Most respondents agreed (34.8%) or strongly agreed (52.2%) that it is important for chiropractors to be educated in evidence-based practice. A majority agreed (35.6%) or strongly agreed (25.8%) the emphasis of chiropractic intervention is to eliminate vertebral subluxations/vertebral subluxation complexes. A large number of respondents (55.2%) were not in favor of expanding the scope of the chiropractic profession to include prescribing medications with appropriate advanced training. Most respondents estimated that chiropractors should be considered mainstream health care practitioners (69.1%). Several respondents (46.8%) think that chiropractic research should focus on the physiological mechanisms of chiropractic adjustments.

Conclusion

The chiropractic students in this study showed a preference for participating in mainstream health care, report an exposure to evidence-based practice, and desire to hold to traditional chiropractic theories and practices. The majority of students would like to see an emphasis on correction of vertebral subluxation, while a larger percent found it is important to learn about evidence-based practice. These two key points may seem contradictory, suggesting cognitive dissonance. Or perhaps some students want to hold on to traditional theory (e.g., subluxation-centered practice) while recognizing the need for further research to fully explore these theories. Further research on this topic is needed.

Differentiating intraprofessional attitudes toward paradigms in health care delivery among chiropractic factions: results from a randomly sampled survey

By |February 13, 2014|Research|

Differentiating intraprofessional attitudes toward paradigms in health care delivery among chiropractic factions: results from a randomly sampled survey


SOURCE:  BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2014, 14:51 ~ FULL TEXT

Marion McGregor, Aaron A Puhl, Christine Reinhart, H Stephen Injeyan and David Soave


Background


As health care has increased in complexity and health care teams have been offered as a solution, so too is there an increased need for stronger interprofessional collaboration. However the intraprofessional factions that exist within every profession challenge interprofessional communication through contrary paradigms. As a contender in the conservative spinal health care market, factions within chiropractic that result in unorthodox practice behaviours may compromise interprofessional relations and that profession’s progress toward institutionalization. The purpose of this investigation was to quantify the professional stratification among Canadian chiropractic practitioners and evaluate the practice perceptions of those factions.

Methods


A stratified random sample of 740 Canadian chiropractors was surveyed to determine faction membership and how professional stratification could be related to views that could be considered unorthodox to current evidence-based care and guidelines. Stratification in practice behaviours is a stated concern of mainstream medicine when considering interprofessional referrals.

Results


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WHO Focuses on Aging Population for World Health Day

By |March 12, 2012|Research|

Between 2000 and 2050, the proportion of the world’s population over 60 years will double from about 11 percent to 22 percent.

Source Occupational Health and Safety

One of the biggest social transformations is population aging. Soon, the world will have more older people than children and more people of very old age than ever before. The World Health Organization is focusing on aging and health for World Health Day on April 7.

The world will have more people who live to see their 80s or 90s than ever before. The number of people aged 80 years or older, for example, will have almost quadrupled to 395 million between 2000 and 2050. There is no historical precedent for a majority of middle-aged and older adults having living parents, as is already the case today. More children will know their grandparents and even their great-grandparents.

With that in mind Chiropractic and Manual Therapy has just published the first paper in a thematic series on chiropractic care in older adults. This thematic series provides an overview of current best evidence in key aspects of evaluation and management of chiropractic care for older adults. Individual articles address the magnitude of musculo-skeletal problems in the elderly population, diagnostic challenges for chiropractors and other manual therapists seeing elderly patients, the evidence for chiropractic and manual therapy in the care of the elderly and also imaging modalities for musculo-skeletal disorders in the elderly including utility, validity and cost.

You can download the provisional pdf here.

Concierge Chiropractic

By |February 2, 2011|Health Care|

Chicago, IL (PRWEB)

Doctors Bryan Abrams and Anthony Ries have recently launched Concierge Chiropractic, a new business venture that brings treatment directly to the patient’s residence or business in downtown Chicago (specifically Gold Coast, River North, and Streeterville) Chicago. The doctors come equipped with a portable table, doctor’s kit, assistant and patient gowns to readily transform any home into a chiropractic office. (more…)