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Study offers suggestions on what to do when sex is a pain in the back

By |September 12, 2014|Biomechanics|



Professor Stuart McGill demonstrates the motion of the spine during sex in a handout photo. Contrary to popular belief, spooning is not always the best sex position for those with a bad back, according to new research from the University of Waterloo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-University of Waterloo

For many people, intimacy in the bedroom often takes a back seat to low back pain, say researchers, who have scientifically determined the best sexual positions to prevent spinal muscles from seizing up at an inopportune moment.

In what they believe is the first biomechanical study of its kind, researchers at the University of Waterloo have found that certain positions are better than others for keeping different kinds of back pain at bay.

And they’ve thrown out the long-held belief that spooning — where partners lie sideways curled back to front — is the only pose for back-saving sex.

“Before now, spooning was often recommended by physicians as the one position that fit all. But as we’ve discovered, that is not the case,” said Natalie Sidorkewicz, a PhD candidate and lead author of the paper published Thursday in the journal Spine.

“What that failed to do was recognize that there are all sorts of triggers for back pain,” she said from Waterloo, Ont. “So someone may find relief in one position that may cause pain for someone else.”

To conduct the study, the researchers recruited 10 heterosexual couples, with an average age of about 30, to have sexual intercourse in a controlled laboratory setting.

Each participant was fitted with remote sensors, which tracked how their spines moved when they engaged in five common sex positions. Infrared and electromagnetic motion capture systems — such as those used to animate figures in video games and films — showed how the men’s and women’s spines flexed when they assumed each position.

“So we were able to actually determine what angle the spine is at, at each moment in time that they’re having sex,” said Sidorkewicz, adding that electrodes on participants’ skin also captured activity in their core and hip muscles.

The findings were used to create an atlas, or set of guidelines, that recommends different sex positions and thrusting techniques based on what movements trigger a patient’s pain.

Miss Correct Posture

By |September 12, 2014|Posture|

Source Neatorama and Google Life Archives



In the 50s and 60s, American chiropractors held a series of rather unusual beauty pageants where contestants were judged and winners picked not only by their apparent beauty and poise, but also their standing posture (backed with X-rays of their spines, of course).

The contests were a publicity stunt, Reginal Hug, past president of the Association for the History of Chiropractic, told Scott Hensley of NPR, and was meant to burnish the reputation of the profession. The message, he said, was that good posture led to good health and that chiropractors could help with that. “In those days, nobody was concerned about radiation,” Hug added, noting the use of X-rays to check for spinal structures.miss-correct-posture-3

Why not contests for men? Actually, there were some but they weren’t as popular and didn’t last very long. “The guys always slouched,” Hug added.

Like many things that were hot back in the early 20th century (like flagpole sitting, goldfish swallowing and phone booth stuffing), the popularity of the chiropractic beauty pageant waned. The last big contest was held in Chattanooga, Tennessee, in 1969.



World Spine Day – October 16th

By |October 15, 2013|News|


Every year on October 16th people from around the world join together to raise awareness on World Spine Day as part of the Bone and Joint Decade’s Action Week.

Spinal disorders, such as back pain, neck pain, scoliosis and disc disease, to name a few are common, and they can have a profound effect on a person’s overall health, impacting a person’s ability to work, to enjoy everyday activities and even disrupting healthy sleep patterns.

Research has demonstrated that poor postures and inactivity can contribute to the development of back pain and other spinal disorders.

The good news is that many of these common problems can be easily avoided!

That’s why this year’s theme for World Spine Day is “Straighten Up and Move,” focusing on the importance of proper posture and movement in maintaining good spinal health. To help mark World Spine Day, participating health care providers and organizations around the world will provide important information, tips and tools to help prevent many of these spinal disorders.

WSD received several nominations from across the globe, representing several organizations
and professions all with special interest in spinal health for the interim WSD International
Organizing Committee (IOC). The WSD IOC will be responsible for providing input regarding
themes, content, resource materials and formation of a permanent committee.
Committee members will include:
Dr. Ina Diener- South African Society of Physiotherapy (South Africa)
Dr. Veronika Fialka-Moser- Medizinische Universität Wien (Austria)
Dr. Deborah Kopansky-Giles, BJD ICC and World Federation of Chiropractic (Canada)
Dr. Jennifer Nash, World Spine Day (Canada)
Nick Pahl- British Acupuncture Council (United Kingdom)
Marilyn Pattison- World Federation of Occupational Therapists (Australia)

Don’t sit up straight

By |April 5, 2011|News, Uncategorized|

Source MSNBC

The longstanding advice to “sit up straight” has been turned on its head by a new study that suggests leaning back is a much better posture.

Researchers analyzed different postures and concluded that the strain of sitting upright for long hours is a perpetrator of chronic back problems.

Using a new form of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), researchers studied 22 volunteers with no back pain history. The subjects assumed three different positions: slouching; sitting up straight at 90 degrees; and sitting back with a 135-degree posture—all while their spines were scanned. (more…)