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Dr. Allan Gotlib awarded the Order of Canada

By |July 3, 2012|News|

Source The Canadian Chiropractic Association Bulletin

Alan Gotlib, C.M.Dr. Allan Gotlib, director of Research Programs and editor of the Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association has been awarded the Order of Canada for his work developing the profession’s research capacity.

The Governor General announced this year’s recipients last Friday, June 29th.

Dr. Gotlib has been named a Member of the Order of Canada. The Member designation recognizes achievements in a particular field, in this case health.

The Order of Canada, one of our country’s highest civilian honours, was established in 1967, during Canada’s centennial year, to recognize a lifetime of outstanding achievement, dedication to community and service to the nation. Over the last 45 years, more than 5,000 people from all sectors of society have been invested into the Order.

Allan’s work on behalf of the profession for more than two decades has been groundbreaking. He has facilitated the establishment of university-based chiropractic professorships and research chairs across the country, he serves as executive vice-president of the Canadian Chiropractic Research Foundation, and has been pivotal in creating the profession’s research Consortium.

Dr. Gotlib has held many Committee positions including Executive Committee for the Canadian Cochrane Network and Center, CIHR President’s Voluntary Sector Committee, president of the College of Chiropractors of Ontario, Transitional Council of the College of Naturopaths of Ontario, Deputy Judges Council in Ontario, and bencher on the Law Society of Upper Canada.

He is a past full professor at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College in Toronto and maintains membership in the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME), the American Medical Writers Association (AMWA) and the Canadian Pediatric Society.

In 2006, he received the Chiropractor of the Year award from the Ontario Chiropractic Association, the highest award given by the association in Ontario. In 2007, he received the Canadian Chiropractic Association Medal of Merit, the highest award given by the profession in Canada and, in 2007 he received the Homewood Professorship from the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, its highest academic award.

Danish vaccine scientist indicted in US

By |April 20, 2011|Vaccination|

Autism researcher accused of embezzling $1 million
Source Copenhagen Post

American prosecutors are seeking to extradite a Danish scientist who a federal grand jury in Atlanta has charged with 13 counts of wire fraud and nine counts of money laundering. They allege that Poul Thorsen, 49, stole over $1 million from autism research funding between February 2004 and June 2008, and used the proceeds to buy a home in Atlanta, two cars and a Harley Davidson.

Thorsen helped two Danish government agencies obtain research grants, which amounted to $11 million between 2000 and 2009, whilst he was working as a visiting scientist at the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the 1990s. He returned to Denmark as the ‘principal investigator’ for the programme, which studied the relationship between autism and exposure to vaccines, allegedly putting him in charge of the administration of the funding.

(more…)

New Study Reveals: Starting with Chiropractic Saves 40% on Low Back Pain Care

By |November 16, 2010|News|

New Study Reveals: Starting with Chiropractic Saves 40% on Low Back Pain Care

The Chiro.Org Blog


SOURCE:   Insurancenewsnet.Com


A new JMPT study finds that low back pain care initiated with a doctor of chiropractic (DC) saves 40% on health care costs when compared with care initiated through a medical doctor (MD), the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) announced today. The study, featuring data from 85,000 Blue Cross Blue Shield beneficiaries, concludes that insurance companies that restrict access to chiropractors for low back pain treatment may inadvertently pay more for care than they would if they removed such restrictions.

Low back pain is a significant public health problem. Up to 85 percent of Americans have back pain at some point in their lives. In addition to its negative effects on employee productivity, back pain treatment accounts for about $50 billion annually in health care costs—making it one of the top 10 most costly conditions treated in the United States.

The study, Cost of Care for Common Back Pain Conditions Initiated With Chiropractic Doctor vs. Medical Doctor/Doctor of Osteopathy as First Physician: Experience of One Tennessee-Based General Health Insurer, which is available online and will also be published in the December 2010 issue of the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, looked at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee’s intermediate and large group fully insured population over a two-year span. The insured study population had open access to MDs and DCs through self-referral, and there were no limits applied to the number of MD/DC visits allowed and no differences in co-pays. (more…)

New Research Chair

By |June 10, 2010|Research|

From The Canadian Chiropractic Association Update

The Canadian Chiropractic Research Foundation (CCRF) is pleased to announce that Dr. Paul Bruno has been awarded the new and distinguished Research Chair in Neuromusculoskeletal Health in the Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies at the University of Regina.

The Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies is located in the $32 million Centre for Kinesiology, Health and Sport, which opened in 2004. The Centre has outstanding laboratory and research facilities, which includes the fully equipped Neuromechanical Research Centre and houses the Allied Health Centre. The $500,000 investment in this Chair builds on CCRF’s research capacity program across Canada.

MMR Doctor Struck From Register

By |May 24, 2010|News|

Source BBC News

The doctor who first suggested a link between MMR vaccinations and autism is to be struck off the medical register.

The General Medical Council found Dr Andrew Wakefield guilty of serious professional misconduct over the way he carried out his controversial research. It follows a GMC ruling earlier this year that he had acted unethically. Dr Wakefield, who is now based in the US, has consistently claimed the allegations are unfair. He now says he will appeal against the verdict.

His 1998 Lancet study caused vaccination rates to plummet, resulting in a rise in measles – but the findings were later discredited. The GMC ruled in January Dr Wakefield had acted “dishonestly and irresponsibly” in conducting his research, but under its procedures the sanctions are made at a later date. The case did not investigate whether Dr Wakefield’s findings were right or wrong, instead it focused on the methods of research. (more…)